The Liberty Song

Saturday, November 19, AD 2016

 

Something for the weekend.  The Liberty Song sung by Bobby Horton.

Written by Founding Father John Dickinson in 1768, the song was sung by patriots in America to the tune of Heart of OakThe video below is the most hilarious scene from the John Adams mini-series where a completely fish out of water John Adams gets donations for the American cause from French aristocrats as they sing the Liberty Song, led by Ben Franklin who is obviously immensely enjoying himself.  It is a good song for Americans to recall, and perhaps especially so in this year of grace, 2016.

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4 Responses to The Liberty Song

  • Vive la France !

    France was the first country to recognize Texas independence.

    Their flag is one of the Six Flags Over Texas.

    http://frenchlegationmuseum.org/?page_id=355

  • I think related to this account is the now-breaking story of how last night (11/18/16, Friday) Mike Pence attended a performance of “Hamilton” (the musical) in NY at the Richard Rodgers Theater on Broadway:

    http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/trump-demands-apology-from-hamilton-cast-after-mike-pence-booed/ar-AAku2i4?li=BBnb7Kz&ocid=DELLDHP

    Pence, who in my mind has re-defined for the better the word “gentleman” was treated to a consummately insulting cascade of boos as he took his seat in the theater; but wait, wait, it gets better—at the end of the show when the actors returned to take their bows, Brandon Dixon, who plays the part of Aaron Burr, decided to lecture Pence in richly ironic and unconsciously self-parodying words as follows:

    “Mike Pence, we welcome you here. We are the diverse Americans who are alarmed and anxious that your new administration will not protect us, our planet, our children, our parents. “Or defend us and uphold our inalienable rights … we hope that this show has inspired you to uphold our American values and work on behalf of all of us,” he continued, to rising cheers. ”

    “We thank you for sharing this wonderful American story, told by a diverse group of men and women of different colors, creeds and orientations.”

    There is too much bovine elimination here to address in Dixon’s remarkably superior and haughty “address”.

    But tellingly, as with all good leftists, they do all the talking, allow for no response, and do no listening. That kind of describes Don McClarey’s outstanding political analysis of the vote demographics and results of the Nov. 8th election right there.

    Keep it up, donkey-derrieres!

  • And by the way, Trump rightly, in the most appropriate way, called the ambush “rude”, and demanded an apology—the best way to seize the moral high ground from tone-deaf leftists

  • I would say 2016 is a “year of grace” in that Hillary was defeated. But I can’t really say the same about Donald Trump’s election.

    ..

    Notice explicit mentioning of liberty is practically, if not completely, absent Trump’s rhetoric?

Fortnight For Freedom: Liberty Song

Saturday, June 29, AD 2013

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops have proclaimed a second Fortnight for Freedom from June 21-July 4th, and, as last year, The American Catholic will participate with special blog posts each day.

Something for the Weekend.  Liberty Song.  Written by Founding Father John Dickinson in 1768, the song was sung by patriots in America to the tune of Heart of OakThe video above is the most hilarious scene from the John Adams mini-series where a completely fish out of water John Adams gets donations for the American cause from French aristocrats as they sing the Liberty Song, led by Ben Franklin who is obviously immensely enjoying himself.  It is a good song for Americans to recall, and perhaps especially so in this year of grace, 2013.

 

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Cool, Considerate Man

Saturday, June 26, AD 2010

Something for the weekend.  Cool Considerate Men from the musical 1776.  I have always loved the musical 1776, although I recognize that the actual history and what is depicted in the musical often part company.  Perhaps the greatest divergence is in the case of John Dickinson, a member of Congress from Pennsylvania, who is represented in the play as an arch reactionary and  Tory. Dickinson, as the play rightly indicates at the end, enlisted to fight in the Revolution, and had the odd military career of serving  first as a militia Brigadier General and then as a militia Private.  During the War he also served as President (Governor) of Delaware and as President (Governor) of Pennsylvania.  After the War he served as a delegate from Pennsylvania at the Constitutional Convention, and supported the ratification with a series of articles written under the pen name Fabius.

Dickinson mainly opposed an immediate declaration of independence in 1776 because he wished the Articles of Confederation, which he had largely drafted, to be first sent to the 13 colonies and ratified by them, and for the colonies to obtain a powerful foreign ally before such a declaration was made to the World.  Dickinson was a firm patriot willing to risk his own skin in the War, so his opposition to the Declaration of Independence did no long term damage to his reputation during his life.

On July 1, he made a speech against immediate independence.  The debate was apparently fierce while he spoke, and thus the speech has a fragmentary quality:

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One Response to Cool, Considerate Man

  • I am a huge fan of 1776. But I agree there are times when it drifted from accuracy. Granted it was done for dramatic purposes. But it still leaves some false impressions. Some of what they put in John Adams mouth & some of his actions are actually that of his cousin Sam. In fact at 1 point Dickinson is describing Sam Adams, not John Adams. Sam Adams was the more radical of the 2 & the real firebrand.

    But it is true that John Adams & John Dickinson were antagonists.