Review of the Lincoln Trailer

Thursday, October 18, AD 2012

The idea of reviewing movie trailers I find somewhat humorous, but I think that Grace Randolph in the above video does a good job of attempting such a review in regard to the Lincoln movie by Spielberg being released in November.  In an earlier post last week, which may be read here, I took issue with Spielberg’s historical ignorance and/or political bias regarding how, in his view, the Democrat and Republican parties have switched positions.  This will not deter me from attending the film, as I attempt not to allow the politics of those involved with a film to influence my opinion of the film.  Having said that, like Ms. Randolph I have concerns as to whether Daniel Day-Lewis will create the suspension of disbelief to allow us to view him as Lincoln in the film.

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6 Responses to Review of the Lincoln Trailer

7 Responses to General George S. Patton: Art and Life

  • Donald,

    Just in case no one else tells you – Keep posting stuff like this. I love it.

  • Thank you Nicholas. The Law pays my bills, but History always rules my mind.

  • I remember seeing this powerful movie – but not the opening speech as much as the size of the flag. Thanks for the replay because, as is said, after all these years …
    When I was little, I found a leather case in my father’s top drawer which contained a little medal and paper that said Lucky Bastards Club. There was a picture of him with soldiers (airmen? Air Force) next to an airplane. He was a tailgunner between England and Germany, later an aircraft mechanic. I always felt embarassed by whatever that club could mean and didn’t ask him. Think I get it now.

  • Your father was a very brave and lucky man PM.

    “The casualties suffered by the 8th Air Force in World War II exceeded those of the US Marine Corps and the US Navy combined.

    The B-17G carried a standard crew of 10: comprising a pilot, co-pilot, bombardier/chin turret gunner, navigator/cheek gunner, flight engineer/top turret gunner, radio operator, ball turret gunner, two waist gunners, and tail turret gunner.

    The area of England known as East Anglia, about the size of Vermont, became what flyers called an “unsinkable aircraft carrier” and was the home for more than 130 American bases and 75 airfields. Almost 350,000 airmen passed through these 8th Air Force airfields during the war. The very *British* names of these bases became familiar to all who flew — Glatton, Snetterton, Stowmarket, Lavenham, Bassingbourne, Polebrook, Molesworth, Martlesham Heath, Podington, Eye, Bury St Edmunds and Kingscliffe to name just a few.

    The typical airfield in East Anglia was home to about 50 B-17’s or B-24’s and had a compliment of about 2500 men who flew, repaired, serviced and supported the air operation. Not to be forgotten were the men who “kept ’em flying”. For every bomber at the field there were 30 or more men who did not fly. They repaired the plane, loaded the bombs and munitions, policed the field, maintained the radios, cooked and fed 2500 men a day, operated the laundry, worked in the PX, and handled the many other duties required to keep the planes flying and the field operating — all essential to the successful launching of the air strike.

    The average flyer was about 20 years of age and even for these young men the effects of flying very long missions under extreme cold, the constant hum and vibration, and being exposed to enemy fighters and flak, resulted in unusual stress that sometimes resulted in a breakdown. Most flyers slept long hours when not flying. I can attest to that.
    In the early years of the air war crews were required to fly 25 and later 30 and then 35 missions before they were returned to the States. This was called a “tour” and upon completion the survivors automatically became members of the “Lucky Bastards Club”.”

    http://www.galbreath.net/bill/b-17g.htm

  • “KIll them with kindness”, General George Patton. “I can attest to that” means that you, Donald R. McClarey, were a flying man? God love you. In my humble opinion your posted photograph reminds me of Ulysses S. Grant.

  • Thank you so much for the story behind the medal – have been trying to imagine how it was. He spoke little about the time. I suspect that, since his father and mother emigrated from Germany and Austria in the 19-teens to NY just west of Mass. border, the gunning missions began a lifelong off and on vodka disease. He did say that mechanical work was his avocation before and after WWII – cars, trucks, airplanes, even buses – until the need for conversion to metric tools in the 1970’s. The picture of the airmen was taken on an airfield with a B-17 and they had the expressions that spoke of something happily accomplished.

  • RE: AAF air crew bravery. See the movie, “Memphis Belle.” When I was in SAC, I served with men who been bomber crew in the War. Our group CO had been shot down over Ploesti and was a POW.

    I am reading Unbroken by the author of Seabiscuit. I recommend it. It gives a good description of a successful B-24 bomber raid on a Japanese occupied island and of an air raid the air and ground crews endured on an island air base. The author also reports the large numbers of training and accidental air deaths and the pressures and angst suffered between missions (both combat and training). The B-24 ditches at sea on a search mission for another lost aircraft and crew. Our Lord’s bitter agony in the Garden of Gethsemani comes to mind.

    Also, lest we forget: I think 40,000 young Americans (America’s finest) gave the “last full measure of devotion” with 3 Army from Normandy through Czechoslovakia.

    All the WWII men (RIP) with whom I grew up have gone to their rewards. They were the greatest generation, without a doubt.

    Greet them ever with grateful hearts.