The Ten Commandments

Thursday, April 13, AD 2017

All the good the Saviour gave to the world was communicated through this book. But for it we could not know right from wrong. All things most desirable for man’s welfare, here and hereafter, are to be found portrayed in it.

Abraham Lincoln, September 7, 1864

 

 

 

 

Holy Week and Passover coincide this year.  Dennis Prager in the above video imagines what a paradise the world would be if everyone obeyed the Ten Commandments.  Religion is not some extra element in Western Civilization, but at its very core.  Take it away and what is left is an alien and self-destructive force, not long for this world and with no hope of the next.

 

 

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11 Responses to The Ten Commandments

  • How can we possibly know that they are True? Have you seen the tablets? I haven’t. And they didn’t have a tape recorder either. So who knows?

  • If we limit our knowledge of history to what we have seen with our own eyes than we have a May Fly view of existence. The Ten Commandments form the center of the Law of the Old Testament. That they are also True, i.e. good, can be determined by human reason alone, especially when pondering deviations from the Ten Commandments.

    (JFK is parodying the abominable statement of the new Superior General of the Jesuits, linked below:

    http://www.cnsnews.com/blog/michael-w-chapman/jesuit-leader-no-one-recorded-jesus-words-marriage-its-nuanced-never-black)

  • The Dolores Passion of Our Lord Jesus Christ, by Anne Catherine Emmerick is the vision upon which Mel Gibson based his film The Passion of The Christ. It is available in audio book. “Love God with thy whole heart, mind and strength and thy neighbor as thyself” is the whole law and the prophets.
    Everywhere in the Torah, the first five books of the Bible, the Ten Commandments are expounded, again and again.

  • that is: The Dolorous Passion of Our Lord Jesus Christ. It needed repeating.

  • “I AM WHO I AM” “TELL THEM: “I AM” SENDS YOU.”

  • Many, including some Catholics, have removed commandments and replaced it with Suggestions. False mercy and a disbelief in Hell have corralled many into honoring false God’s, ie LBGT as a normal acceptable forms of lifestyle to the point of discrimination laws muting the consciences of God fearing business owners. Abortion as Rights.
    Sodomy, pedophelia, pornography… God’s of today to name just a few.
    If we don’t come back to the basics, the Ten Commandments, we will suffer the fire from above..No deluge this time..but a fire that will rain down on much of humanity.

    Our Lady, Queen of Peace, save souls from the fires of Hell.

  • Unlike posted speed limits, which are merely recommendations, The Ten Commandment are mandatory, true, and vital.

    I saw on Facebook the latest detritus (“:Opinion is not truth.” Plato) from the head dastard at the so-called “Society of Jesus.” Those people never fail to disappoint.

  • The 10 Commandments, contrary as they are to the concupiscence of the eyes, flesh and the pride of life, are now being questioned indirectly by Pope Francis and directly by his spokesman Fr. Abascal, the new superior of the Jesuits. Can anyone have imagined this: that we are being invited to disbelieve the teaching of God by the Pope himself? I guess aside from praying for these people we should be thankful that we realize what is happening and inform others as this blog does so well.

  • “we are being invited to disbelieve the teaching of God by the Pope ” I hear you Michael Dowd and the confusion caused by what is happening in the Church, from top to bottom, hurts me almost physically.
    When we travel we meet so many Catholics so effusive of the goodness of the pope that we are left speechless.

  • Oddly enough, I was marveling about how the very nature of our culture is dependent on Christian/Jewish morals… even the need to write it that way is odd but based on love of other, since like Mr. Prager pointed out on his radio show yesterday, the big argument between us is that we think the Messiah has come, and he does not. (I didn’t catch why it had come up, just that little snippet.)

    It’s not going to fall, although it can get weaker or stronger; it is not a fast way, but it WORKS. Wonderfully made. 😀

  • It would have been 15 commandments if Moses hadn’t been such a klutz

O Sacred Head

Saturday, April 4, AD 2015

Something for the weekend.  O Sacred Head Now Wounded.  The lyrics of this hymn derive from the latin poem Salve Mundi Salutare.  The authorship is open to doubt although I agree with those who attribute at least part of the poem to Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, based upon stylistic similarities with portions of his other writings.    The sanctity and eloquence of Saint Bernard alloyed with the musical genius of Johann Sebastian Bach makes a potent combination indeed.

On a personal note this hymn has always moved me as no other does.  I had it played at my son’s funeral and when I depart this Vale of Tears I have requested that it be played at mine.  It reminds me that God died for me, something I find absolutely stunning.  Love and sacrifice begin and end with God, who regards each man as if there were no other.

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3 Responses to O Sacred Head

  • I don’t want to go off on an “I hate new hymns” rant, but…yeah. Today we sang Jesus Christ is Risen Today: But the pains which he endured / Our salvation have procured. Do kids growing up listening to contemporary hymns get exposed to theology like that? It’s unequivocal. A friend of mine who grew up secular once told me that with his conversion to Catholicism, all the Christmas songs he knew now made sense. There’s a richness of teaching that people my age have absorbed without realizing it.

    Digression time: you’re a science fiction fan, right, Don? I remember a ST Next Generation episode where Worf found himself in a prison colony of Klingons who had forgotten their beliefs. He taught them their legends, explained to them the meaning of the songs they’d handed down and the trinkets they played with. I’m convinced the episode must have been written by a traditional (or traditionalist) Catholic. Do you know the one? It’s fascinating to watch and think about as a VII / ecumenism analogy.

  • We’re forgetting the things that made us different, the things worth defending. Peace is a valuable goal, but at what price? We’re a shrinking population, content to fade away. But there’s something else out there: the Borg. They can use our technology against us, and they don’t recognize the value of freedom and love. They’ll overrun us if we don’t remember who we are. All that we’ve worked to create will be lost, our inner rot leaving us unable to stand against the wind. If we did somehow manage to withstand the onslaught, do we still have the thing about us that’s worth protecting?

One Response to What Wondrous Love is This?

  • “We adore You, O Christ, and we bless You. Because by Your Holy Cross You have redeemed the world.”

    Wondrous Love indeed: Christ loves us, forgives us, and redeems us. Even though we completely, utterly do not merit salvation.

    His Sacred Heart was so filled with love for us even during in His three hours agony on His Holy Cross.

    He loves us and forgives us despite the fact that we were utterly unjust in condemning Him. How could we? Not only is He all good and sinless. He is Our God and Reedeemer. And, He, despite all the horrid evil we did to him: it was completely unjust and disobedient; He still loves us and forgives us. That is wondrous, eternal, divine love, indeed.

    “O my Jesus, forgive us our sins; save us from the fire of Hell; take all souls to Heaven; and help especially those most in need of Thy mercy.”

    I am not worthy. That hand with that hammer is my hand when I fail to forgive, when I abandon charity, when I sin.

    “Lord Jesus Christ, Son of the Living God, have mercy on me a sinner.”

Christianity and the Miraculous

Monday, March 29, AD 2010

Today, Palm Sunday, and throughout the rest of Holy Week, we devote ourselves to the central mysteries of our faith as Christians: Christ’s triumphant entry into Jerusalem. The Last Supper, which instituted for us the mystery of the Holy Eucharist. The suffering and death of Christ on the cross. His resurrection on the third day.

These miracles are the very center of our faith. As Saint Paul said, if Christ did not rise from the dead, then our faith is in vain. Or to paraphrase Flannery O’Connor’s use of rather more modern parlance, “If it isn’t true, to hell with it.”

This central miracle, Christ’s death and resurrection, is the miracle which gives our faith meaning and sets it radically apart from the “he was a good man killed by the authorities for standing up for the poor” substitute which some propose. For if Christ was not God, if He did not rise from the dead, if He did not offer to us eternal salvation, then “he was a good man” is no half-way-there substitute. The resurrection is a miracle so unlikely, so scandalous that we must either embrace it wholly or reject Christianity with scorn. The events of Holy Week are not something we can accept half-way, and by accepting them we accept something which goes utterly and completely beyond the natural and predictable world. A miracle.

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5 Responses to Christianity and the Miraculous

  • A very provocative post Darwin.

    So in the spirit of constructive engagement you say you loathe anything as approaching the miraculous as well as biblical literalism.

    Many Catholics, including Father Benedict Groeschel as well as myself don’t believe in coincidences, but in God’s hand in all things.

    How do you explain that Jesus fed thousands with a few loaves with your eisegesis?

    I’ll admit if I misread your posting.

  • I think you may have misread me a bit, Tito. My argument was that while in everyday life I tend not to assume a miraculous explanation for something which could just as well be chance or coincidence (for instance, happening to find a missing set of keys moments after pausing to pray to St. Anthony) I think it’s entirely inappropriate to treat the miracles in the Gospels this way.

    Finding a set of keys is something which happens all the time without the need for miraculous help. Feeding 10,000 people, on the other hand, is not something that “just happens”. Nor is the incarnation of Christ something that “just happens”. Indeed, if we accept that Christ was God, and we accept the Gospels as what they claim to be (an account of Christ’s work on Earth) we have already accepted that the Gospels are about the most incredibly miraculous events possible.

    What I am questioning here is: Why is it that some people accept Christ’s divinity and resurrection, yet then turn around and toss out half the gospels with “oh, well, the feeding of the 10,000 probably wasn’t a real miracle, it’s just a fable for sharing” or “Lazarus probably wasn’t really dead, he was just unconscious” or “Jesus didn’t really walk on water, that’s just mythological language”. This miracles are small potatoes if we accept Christ, and if we accept Christ it seems entirely reasonable to believe the incredible and miraculous things would happen around Him.

    I don’t understand the urge to accept Christ, but then reject (seemingly at random) some of His miracles — as if it is rational to accept Christ but irrational to accept that he really rose from the dead or that he really fed large crowds or walked on water.

  • Thanks Darwin.

    Don’t use me as a barometer to how well your columns are written. I’m better at history than theology comprehension.

  • Well, and given that I wrote it between 11pm and 1am… There’s probably blame to share.

  • Biblical context works best for me. The Gospels are set up as books of testimony, so already I have to go in thinking: this happened, or at least that something major occurred.

    Secondy, there are places in the texts where Jesus is specifically said to be speaking in metaphor. If the author is going to go to that length then why not do us the favor and tell us that his miracles are just literary metaphors?

    While I’m open to the notion that events or ideas could possibly be attributed to Jesus in order to emphasize a theological or historical point, Im no less inclined to take the Gospels at there word.

    After all, these miracles aren’t just abnormal for us, they were abnormal in Jesus’ time; which was not lacking in supply of sceptics either.

An Easter Peace

Thursday, April 9, AD 2009

One of our reasons for being here on The American Catholic is to provide a forum for spirited yet respectful discourse on the often controversial intersection of Catholicism and civic life. I know I very much enjoy the controversies here, and I’ve learned a lot from the other writers and commenters here over the last seven months.

However, there is a time and place for everything, and as we enter the most sacred period of the year, there’s been discussion among our contributors about instituting an Easter Peace of sorts. We will not be closing comments, however we would respectfully ask that readers consider adopting a more restrained tone between evening of Holy Thursday and the morning of Easter Monday. (If you find the time to read at all.)

All new posts during that time will be on Holy Week related themes.

last_supper

From the writing team: A blessed Triduum and Easter to all our readers.

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7 Responses to An Easter Peace

Triduum

Thursday, April 9, AD 2009

As we enter into the Holy Triduum, I’d like to invite a reading of Pope Benedict’s catechesis given during yesterday’s general audience, appropriately deemed by Sandro Magister “A Handbook for Holy Week”:

Dear brothers and sisters, Holy Week, which for us Christians is the most important week of the year, offers us the opportunity to be immersed in the central events of Redemption, to relive the Paschal Mystery, the great mystery of the faith. Beginning tomorrow afternoon, with the Mass “In Coena Domini,” the solemn liturgical rites will help us to meditate in a more lively manner on the Passion, Death and Resurrection of the Lord in the days of the Holy Paschal Triduum, fulcrum of the entire liturgical year. May divine grace open our hearts to comprehend the inestimable gift that salvation is, obtained for us by Christ’s sacrifice. [Read the rest]

(The homilies of Pope Benedict XVI for Holy Week 2009 will be made available here, on the Vatican website).

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