Terri Schiavo Was Unavailable For Comment

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Jesus Wept:

People with severe brain injuries sometimes emerge from a coma awake but unresponsive, leaving families with painful questions. Are they aware? Can they think and feel? Do they have any chance of recovery?

A new study has found that PET scans may help answer these wrenching questions. It found that a significant number of people labeled vegetative had received an incorrect diagnosis and actually had some degree of consciousness and the potential to improve. Previous studies using electroencephalogram machines and M.R.I. scanners have also found signs of consciousness in supposedly vegetative patients.

“I think these patients are kind of neglected by both medicine and society,” said Dr. Steven Laureys, an author of the new study and the director of the Coma Science Group at the University of Liège in Belgium. “Many of them don’t even see a medical doctor or a specialist for years. So I think it’s very important to ask the question, are they unconscious?”

In the United States, 100,000 to 300,000 people are thought to be minimally conscious, and an additional 25,000 are vegetative. In Belgium, the combined incidence of the two conditions is about 150 new cases per year, Dr. Laureys said.

An article about the new research was published on Tuesday in The Lancet.

Dr. Laureys and his colleagues studied 122 patients with brain injuries, including 41 who had been declared vegetative — awake but with no behavioral signs of awareness. People who are vegetative for a year are thought to have little or no chance of recovering, and the condition can become grounds for withdrawing medical treatment. Terri Schiavo, in a vegetative state for 15 years, died in 2005 in Florida after courts allowed the removal of her feeding tube.

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19 Responses to Terri Schiavo Was Unavailable For Comment

  • The court was told by Michael Schiavo that Terry had said that she would not want to live. Terry could not change her mind, if, in fact, she had said something to that effect? Terry had a strong will to live. It took 18 days for Michael Schiavo, the court and the police to starve Terry to death.
    .
    “Where did we go wrong?” “When you put the first innocent person to death.” from the Trial at Nuremberg

  • So sad.

    It’s clear her husband didnt want the “burden” of caring for her on that state.

    The PET scan is such a simple procedure, as they inject the radiation and wait around 45mins for it to travel in your body. I’ve had 3. And if that could have put to bed the argument that she wasn’t conscious enough to be alive, then its heartbreaking.

    God see’s all. His Just Love cannot be fooled, and the parties that had her starved to death will answer to Him. God have mercy on their souls.

  • ““Where did we go wrong?” “When you put the first innocent person to death.” from the Trial at Nuremberg”

    Ernst Janning: “Judge Haywood… the reason I asked you to come: Those people, those millions of people… I never knew it would come to that. You must believe it, you must believe it!”

    Judge Dan Haywood: “Herr Janning, it “came to that” the first time you sentenced a man to death you knew to be innocent.”

    Judgment at Nuremberg (1961)

  • “It’s clear her husband didnt want the “burden” of caring for her on that state.”

    STATE OF FLORIDA )
    COUNTY OF PINELLAS )

    BEFORE ME the undersigned authority personally appeared CARLA
    SAUER IYER, R.N., who being first duly sworn, deposes and says:

    1. My name is Carla Sauer Iyer. I am over the age of eighteen and make
    this statement of my own personal knowledge.

    2. I am a registered nurse in the State of Florida, having been licensed
    continuously in Florida from 1997 to the present. Prior to that I was a
    Licensed Practical Nurse for about four years.

    3. I was employed at Palm Garden of Largo Convalescent Center in
    Largo, Florida from April 1995 to July 1996, while Terri Schiavo
    was a patient there.

    4. It was clear to me at Palm Gardens that all decisions regarding Terri
    Schiavo were made by Michael Schiavo, with no allowance made for
    any discussion, debate or normal professional judgment. My initial
    training there consisted solely of the instruction “Do what Michael
    Schiavo tells you or you will be terminated.” This struck me as
    extremely odd.

    -1-

    5. I was very disturbed by the decision making protocol, as no allowance
    whatsoever was made for professional responsibility. The atmosphere
    throughout the facility was dominated by Mr. Schiavo’s intimidation.
    Everyone there, with the exception of several people who seemed to be
    close to Michael, was intimidated by him. Michael Schiavo always
    had an overbearing attitude, yelling numerous times such things as
    “This is my order and you’re going to follow it.” He is very large and
    uses menacing body language, such as standing too close to you,
    getting right in your face and practically shouting.

    6. To the best of my recollection, rehabilitation had been ordered for
    Terri, but I never saw any being done or had any reason at all to
    believe that there was ever any rehab of Terri done at Palm Gardens
    while I was there. I became concerned because Michael wanted
    nothing done for Terri at all, no antibiotics, no tests, no range of
    motion therapy, no stimulation, no nothing. Michael said again and
    again that Terri should NOT get any rehab, that there should be no
    range of motion whatsoever, or anything else. I and a CNA named
    Roxy would give Terri range of motion anyway. One time I put a
    wash cloth in Terri’s hand to keep her fingers from curling together,

    -2-

    and Michael saw it and made me take it out, saying that was therapy.

    7. Terri’s medical condition was systematically distorted and
    misrepresented by Michael. When I worked with her, she was alert
    and oriented. Terri spoke on a regular basis while in my presence,
    saying such things as “mommy,” and “help me.” “Help me” was, in
    fact, one of her most frequent utterances. I heard her say it hundreds
    of times. Terri would try to say the word “pain” when she was in
    discomfort, but it came out more like “pay.” She didn’t say the “n”
    sound very well. During her menses she would indicate her discomfort
    by saying “pay” and moving her arms toward her lower abdominal
    area. Other ways that she would indicate that she was in pain included
    pursing her lips, grimacing, thrashing in bed, curling her toes or
    moving her legs around. She would let you know when she had a
    bowel movement by flipping up the covers and pulling on her diaper
    and scooted in bed on her bottom.

    8. When I came into her room and said “Hi, Terri”, she would always
    recognize my voice and her name, and would turn her head all the way
    toward me, saying “Haaaiiiii” sort of, as she did. I recognized this as a
    “hi”, which is very close to what it sounded like, the whole sound

    -3-

    being only a second or two long. When I told her humrous stories
    about my life or something I read in the paper, Terri would chuckle,
    sometimes more a giggle or laugh. She would move her whole body,
    upper and lower. Her legs would sometimes be off the bed, and need
    to be repositioned. I made numerous entries into the nursing notes in
    her chart, stating verbatim what she said and her various behaviors, but
    by my next on-duty shift, the notes would be deleted from her chart.
    Every time I made a positive entry about any responsiveness of Terri’s,
    someone would remove it after my shift ended. Michael always
    demanded to see her chart as soon as he arrived, and would take it in
    her room with him. I documented Terri’s rehab potential well,
    writing whole pages about Terri’s responsiveness, but they would
    always be deleted by the next time I saw her chart. The reason I wrote
    so much was that everybody else seemed to be afraid to make positive
    entries for fear of their jobs, but I felt very strongly that a nurses job
    was to accurately record everything we see and hear that bears on a
    patients condition and their family. I upheld the Nurses Practice Act,
    and if it cost me my job, I was willing to accept that.

    9. Throughout my time at Palm Gardens, Michael Schiavo was focused

    -4-

    on Terri’s death. Michael would say “When is she going to die?,”
    “Has she died yet?” and “When is that bitch gonna die?” These
    statements were common knowledge at Palm Gardens, as he would
    make them casually in passing, without regard even for who he was
    talking to, as long as it was a staff member. Other statements which I
    recall him making include “Can’t anything be done to accelerate her
    death – won’t she ever die?” When she wouldn’t die, Michael would
    be furious. Michael was also adamant that the family should not be
    given information. He made numerous statements such as “Make sure
    the parents aren’t contacted.” I recorded Michael’s statements word
    for word in Terri’s chart, but these entries were also deleted after the
    end of my shift. Standing orders were that the family wasn’t to be
    contacted, in fact, there was a large sign in the front of her chart that
    said under no circumstances was her family to be called, call Michael
    immediately, but I would call them, anyway, because I thought they
    should know about their daughter.

    10. Any time Terri would be sick, like with a UTI or fluid buildup in her
    lungs, colds, or pneumonia, Michael would be visibly excited, thrilled
    even, hoping that she would die. He would say something like,

    -5-

    “Hallelujah! You’ve made my day!” He would call me, as I was the
    nurse supervisor on the floor, and ask for every little detail about her
    temperature, blood pressure, etc., and would call back frequently
    asking if she was dead yet. He would blurt out “I’m going to be rich!”
    and would talk about all the things he would buy when Terri died,
    which included a new car, a new boat, and going to Europe, among
    other things.

    11. When Michael visited Terri, he always came alone and always had the
    door closed and locked while he was with Terri. He would typically
    be there about twenty minutes or so. When he left Terri would be
    trembling, crying hysterically, and would be very pale and have cold
    sweats. It looked to me like Terri was having a hypoglycemic reaction,
    so I’d check her blood sugar. The glucometer reading would be so low
    it was below the range where it would register an actual number
    reading. I would put dextrose in Terri’s mouth to counteract it. This
    happened about five times on my shift, as I recall. Normally Terri’s
    blood sugar levels were very stable due to the uniformity of her diet
    through tube feeding. It is medically possible that Michael injected
    Terri with Regular insulin, which is very fast acting, but I don’t have

    -6-

    any way of knowing for sure.

    12. The longer I was employed at Palm Gardens the more concerned I
    became about patient care, both relating to Terri Schiavo, for the
    reasons I’ve said, and other patients, too. There was an LPN named
    Carolyn Adams, known as “Andy” Adams who was a particular
    concern. An unusual number of patients seemed to die on her shift,
    but she was completely unconcerned, making statements such as
    “They are old – let them die.” I couldn’t believe her attitude or the fact
    that it didn’t seem to attract any attention. She made many comments
    about Terri being a waste of money, that she should die. She said it
    was costing Michael a lot of money to keep her alive, and that he
    complained about it constantly (I heard him complain about it all the
    time, too.) Both Michael and Adams said that she would be worth
    more to him if she were dead. I ultimately called the police relative to
    this situation, and was terminated the next day. Other reasons were
    cited, but I was convinced it was because of my “rocking the boat.”

    13. Ms. Adams was one of the people who did not seem to be intimidated
    by Michael. In fact, they seemed to be very close, and Adams would
    do whatever Michael told her. Michael sometimes called Adams at

    -7-

    night and spoke at length. I was not able to hear the content of these
    phone calls, but I knew it was him talking to her because she would
    tell me afterward and relay orders from him.

    14. I have contacted the Schindler family because I just couldn’t stand by
    and let Terri die without the truth being known.

    FURTHER AFFIANT SAYETH NAUGHT.


    CARLA SAUER IYER, R.N.

    The foregoing instrument was acknowledged before me this 29 day of August,
    2003, by CARLA SAUER IYER, R.N., who produced her Florida’s driver’s license
    as identification, and who did take an oath.


    Notary Public

    My commission expires

  • The Code of 1804 (Code Napoléon) provided a very simple definition: a person is dead, when a severed vein no longer bleeds.

    Of course, when hospitals became chop-shops for transplant surgery, this definition was found inconvenient. One might have thought that clarity and certainty in such matters were very convenient indeed, but the article was amended notwithstancing

  • Thank you Donald McClarey. Will save the correct version.
    .
    Terry Schindler Shiavo’s parents fought for custody of her in court. Was Terry allowed Holy Communion? Terry was treated as a non-person. The state does not give personhood. God does.
    .
    Michael wanted Terry dead. Michael Schiavo could have divorced Terry after the court gave custody to the Schindlers, who heartbrokenly had to watch their daughter starved to death. The court gave custody of Terry to the man who wanted her death.

  • Sorry typo, I meant “in” that state (condition), not “on” that state.

    Thank you for the transcript Donald.

    Im speechless. I had heard of Terri’s case, but being outside of the US, didnt know the full details of her story.

    Why didnt the nurse go to the police with evidence that her husband wanted Terri dead? That he was abusing her? That he was intimidating staff? That he tried to spike her sugar levels? That he was altering her records?

    You wish smart phones were around at the time, as it would have been very easy to capture footage or audio of this mans filth.

    I have a query: would you say that regardless of the volumes of evidence presented in court against Michael Schiavo, andin favour of Terri’s consciousness, the state of Florida would have ruled in favour of Michael Schiavo, regardless? If so, why?

  • Ms. Sauer’s testimony is disturbing.

    This is the first time I’ve read it. Thank you Mr. McClarey.

    As Terri suffered her starvation her advocate Pope JP II united his sufferings to that of our Lords on Good Friday 2000 plus years ago. Redemptive suffering for the intentions of what?
    Holy souls in purgatory?
    End of abortion on demand?
    For Terri Schiavo possibly?

    March 31st Terri died. Two days later our beloved Pope of whom championed the right to Life died.

    The struggle for life and these two souls will always be united in my heart. Even though the right to life was denied Terri, the fight is far from over. Right to Life from natural conception to natural death.

  • “Why didnt the nurse go to the police with evidence that her husband wanted Terri dead? That he was abusing her? That he was intimidating staff? That he tried to spike her sugar levels? That he was altering her records?”

    These and other affidavits of staffers were brought to the attention of the court. Judge Greer, incomprehensibly, ruled them to be irrelevant.

    http://archive.lifenews.com/bio1715.html

  • Well the police didnt even investigate the nurses claims. Or they did, and were silenced themselves.

    I wish there was a way to prosecute MIchael Schiavo, in light of the nurses testimony, post-Terris death….this man seems unfit to be living amongst free society.

  • And if the judge ruled them irrelevant, what on earth is “relevant” evidence, when it comes to the insincerity of her husband.

  • In the first weeks of our married life, we roomed with a couple who rented a room to an older person who had gotten hit by a streetcar and was in a coma for36 YEARS! He attended the old state school in Dixon, Ill. and worked at the old Marshal Field in shipping. He would travel all over the country on his vacations, by himself. I do not know if he had any living relatives, but he was happy, had a job to support himself, and a place to live, thanks to our landlady. I also have worked with many physically burdened people over my 40 years as a CNA and had to time and again educate the other workers to slow down, let a person eat, talk to them, in short, treat them as you would like to be treated. It is enormously cruel these days to see the lack of compassion in many nursing homes.

  • Thank you for providing the nurse’s statement. My mother went to the ER on a Mon a.m. with a UTI. She was in her early mid 90s. I won’t go into all the details but by Wed eve she couldn’t communicate. I had to tell the nurse mom’s breathing was raspy as in pneumonia because she said she couldn’t hear it. By Thurs a.m. she was in the ICU. My MD brother kept in contact by phone but couldn’t be there because of the hurricane. On her 11th day in ICU which was the day after the storm passed through, my mother passed to her eternal reward. Unlike Terry Schiavo, her priest was there with me and he gave her the Precious Blood and blessed her with the papal indulgence. Father saw a tear after the blessing and I, concerned that she might be in pain, rang for the nurse. In retrospect I think it was a tear of joy. Mother died an hour later with a kindly nurse reading the 23rd Psalm and I holding mom’s hand and reciting the “Hail Mary…..now and at the hour of her death.”
    Here’s the point of my comment: There are many in the medical field that practice, either elderly or passively, what we describe as elderly euthanasia, . My mother had an advanced medical directive which was in agreement with the teachings of our faith and my brother, an ER doc, and I shared responsibility for her medical treatment. She did not have a DNR. My brother had always advised against it as every case is different. He told us that he had seen instances of patients, not his, in the ER who had DNRs and thus were not given treatment when an antibiotic could have saved an elderly pneumonia victim or meds could have saved a heart patient. In my state a DNR form is bright yellow. Unfortunately the acceptance or refusal in my mother’s case was on the back page.
    In assisted living and hospitals even for any routine test as an outpatient, there is a push to have a Do Not Resuscitate. In the ICU it was the night duty dr., a non Christian, who called and talked about mother’s DNR on 3 occasions. I would set the dr.r straight on NO DNR and refer her to my brother. Even some of the nurses in the ICU had not read mom’s chart thoroughly and only grudgingly let me see it. There was much pressure not to have her intibated, but we did and mother breathed on her own after the treatments and continued to do so up to her death. As my brother said, we gave mother a fighting chance.
    When the chief of service returned from leave I complained but by then it was too late.

  • A typo re elderly euthanasia, I mean to say practicing it either actively or passively, not elderly or passively.
    Happy and Blessed Easter to all.

  • Thank you, Cam. Greatly appreciate this sharing. R.I.P. Cam’s mother.

  • To add to the horror and shame of her murder:

    http://jimmyakin.com/2006/01/terri_shiavos_h.html

    And, while this all happened, Catholic Jeb Bush was silent, hiding under his desk.

  • Michael Schiavo and his mistress can fool the priest, but Michael Schiavo and his mistress cannot fool God. Maybe they deserve each other, worrying about who is going to kill off whom.

  • “Michael Schiavo and his mistress can fool the priest, but Michael Schiavo and his mistress cannot fool God. Maybe they deserve each other, worrying about who is going to kill off whom.”

    Spot on Mary!

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