Tippecanoe and Tyler Too!

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Something for the weekend.  After a fortnight of political conventions I thought it was appropriate to have one of the more popular campaign songs in American political history featured for our weekend song, Tippecanoe and Tyler Too, written by Alexander Coffman Ross, and sung endlessly by the Whigs during the 140 presidential campaign.  Perhaps one of the more vacuous campaigns in our nation’s history, the Whig’s rode to victory on William Henry Harrison’s status as a war hero at the battle of Tippecanoe in 1811 and during the War of 1812, and the poor economy presided over by Democrat Martin Van Buren.  Ironically John Tyler, who was as much an afterthought on the ticket as he is in the song, would serve out the term of Harrison after Harrison died after only 32 days in office.  John Tyler was a Democrat who had only recently converted to the Whig party.  As president he returned to his Democrat roots and had dreadful relations with the Whigs, who would certainly have impeached him but for their losing control of the House in the 1842 elections.  Astoundingly Tyler still has two living grandchildren.

Here is a rock version of the song:

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2 Responses to Tippecanoe and Tyler Too!

  • Thomas Collins says:

    Gee, they had attack ads way back then? I thought “incivility” was invented by Dick Cheney.

    Btw, the Little Magician gave as good as he got. I can’t find a video but here’s his song:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_presidential_election,_1840#Van_Buren

    Rockabye, baby, Daddy’s a Whig
    When he comes home, hard cider he’ll swig
    When he has swug
    He’ll fall in a stu
    And down will come Tyler and Tippecanoe.

    Rockabye, baby, when you awake
    You will discover Tip is a fake.
    Far from the battle, war cry and drum
    He sits in his cabin a’drinking bad rum.

    Rockabye, baby, never you cry
    You need not fear OF Tip and his Ty.
    What they would ruin, Van Buren will fix.
    Van’s a magician, they are but tricks.

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