Prayer to Saint Joseph

YouTube Preview Image

Something for the weekend.  The video above supplying music and images to the prayer to Saint Joseph seemed very appropriate for a Labor Day Weekend.  There was a reason why God chose as His guardian and the husband of His mother a humble carpenter, instead of some great and powerful king.  God does not see as we see.  We judge too often by outward appearance while God judges by the soul and character.  A simple concept one would think, but one that is hard to live by as we too often judge people by their jobs or clothes or any of the other superficial differences between us that loom so large on this earth and which are less than nothing in eternity.

7 Responses to Prayer to Saint Joseph

  • Donald,

    This post offers me the opportunity to ask you a question about a book recommendation while keeping the comment tangential to the post:

    Considering your Illinois roots and interest in history and politics, have you come across a book that you can recommend about the US Labor movement in the late 1800-early 1900s?

    Specifically, I looking for the Catholic influence on the labor movement (Cardinal Gibbons, for instance). I thought of you when I learned that, although she traveled near and far, Mother Jones was from Chicago. Another Catholic who was prominent was Terrence Powderly, and I’m sure many others.

    I’m trying to understand the US labor movement from the perspective of the teaching of the Church on social justice, and I thought you might know of a book that deals with this specifically.

    (BTW, will you be bringing back the TAC Football Poll?)

  • This was beautiful! Thank you for posting it.

  • I have been told that the Crusaders carried this St. Joseph prayer into battle, that they would not perish by the sword, fire or drowning, and ultimately, that they would have a happy death. St. Joseph pray for us. For someone who has been healed of ulcers through the intercession of St. Brother Andre Bissett at St. Joseph’s Oratory in Montreal, Canada, I carry and say the prayer often.

  • It is a beautiful prayer Mary, but it actually came out in 1950. There is a lot of fake history about it on the net, claiming it goes back to 50AD, etc. Complete rubbish.

  • “although she traveled near and far, Mother Jones was from Chicago.”

    She is buried in the Mount Olive Cemetery in Mount Olive, Illinois, a small town along the original Route 66 about 30 miles south of Springfield. She requested to be buried there with miners who were killed during a coal strike in nearby Virden in 1898; these miners she always referred to as “her boys”. At this link are pictures of her funeral, which was held in Mount Olive’s Catholic parish:

    http://www.sj-r.com/blogs/photo/x1612625343/Mother-Jones-the-Joan-of-Arc-of-Labor-is-Laid-to-Rest-in-Mount-Olive

    The link also notes that on Aug. 1 of this year, there was scheduled to be a celebration of her birth and baptism in Cork, Ireland.

  • “I’m trying to understand the US labor movement from the perspective of the teaching of the Church on social justice, and I thought you might know of a book that deals with this specifically.

    (BTW, will you be bringing back the TAC Football Poll?)”

    Not a book in particular, although there is a huge amount on the net as to Cardinal Gibbons and the labor movement. I will try to do a post on Labor Day regarding Cardinal Gibbons and the knights of labor.

    In regard to the TAC Football poll I do not know. My ignorance on sports is so vast, that I have gladly ceded that aspect of the blog to my co-bloggers who can distinguish the Chicago Bears from the Chicago Cubs, and who can understand the undying enmity that exists between Cubs and Socks fans! :)

  • Elaine,
    Thanks for the information. I had heard of the magazine “Mother Jones” in the past, but it seemed too leftist for my tastes. But, it colored my impression of the real Mother Jones. When I learned that she was Catholic, with a brother who is a priest, and who was buried with a funeral Mass, I began to reassess her. I read that despite her association with the Socialist Party, she didn’t really agree with it in the end.

    Donald,
    I’ll look forward to your post on the Knights of Labor and Cardinal Gibbons.

    Oh, yeah … Geaux Tigers!

Follow TAC by Clicking on the Buttons Below
Bookmark and Share
Subscribe by eMail

Enter your email:

Recent Comments
Archives
Our Visitors. . .
Our Subscribers. . .