No Opinion

Mr. Jackson and colleague

Farrah fawcett

When you are a blogger, opinions, usually strong ones, are your stock-in-hobby.  Regular readers of this blog know full well that I am never short of opinions.   However, in regard to the deaths of Farrah Fawcett and the volcanic media eruption upon the death of Michael Jackson, I confess to having no opinions.  I recall Farrah Fawcett vaguely from Charlie’s Angels, a show that sometimes came on when the tv was providing background noise during my college and lawschool years, but if I ever watched more than a few minutes I would be surprised.  Her poster was ubiquitous in the dorms at the time, but the attraction eluded me, something about the smile I found off-putting.  Other than that, nothing as far as I was concerned.

As to Michael Jackson, well an American for the past four decades would have to have been stone deaf not to have heard his music, and I did hear it.  However, I never sought it out, and I had no feeling for it either positive or negative.  Due to his bizarre behavior I always assumed Jackson was a twisted sick puppy, an opinion reinforced by the various accusations of child abuse brought against him.  However, I never followed any stories about him.  I simply was not interested. 

So, in regard to the mild media interest in the death of Farrah Fawcett, and the unending media focus on Michael Jackson which, like Elvis Presley, I think will continue on for several decades, I simply vote “present”.

I am curious as to how many of our readers agree with me and have zero interest in these individuals and how many think that I am missing some angle of  importance.

11 Responses to No Opinion

  • I would second your response. I have never understood the appeal of Jackson’s music. As early as 1984, it was apparent he was a ruin of a man; the years since have been a distasteful freak show. Farrah Fawcett was a journeyman actress who was fetching but otherwise of no special distinction; her passing is of interest to her friends and family.

  • Like many young women in the ’70’s, I spent plenty of time in the bathroom with a curling iron trying to replicate Fawcett’s “feathered” hairstyle. I never once watched “Charlie’s Angels” though, and I forgot all about Fawcett until she was diagnosed with cancer.

    In modern celebrity-worshipping America, the famous seem to be exempt from the rules that govern the rest of us. Except that, ultimately,they’re not – they age, get ill and die just like us lesser mortals. And that seems to shock people who have come to regard the Hollywood crowd in the same light ancient Greek peasants regarded Zeus, Hera and Apollo.

    As far as Jackson goes, well, I liked some of the songs on “Thriller.” I also enjoyed watching him dance on those old MTV videos. But the bottom line is that a 50 year old man who chose to never grow up is an “icon” in today’s world. While undeniably talented (and I think his talent was shown to best advantage in his “Jackson 5″ days, when he was a little ball of dynamite), the talent faded and was replaced by weirdness. I think Jonah Goldberg got it right: Jackson’s life was the tragedy, not his death.

  • Apparently, Farrah Fawcett was Catholic and did receive the last sacraments prior to her death. Also, whatever one may think of her out-of-wedlock relationship with Ryan O’Neal (he did recently ask her to marry him, but the proposal came a little too late), I have to give him credit for having come back to her side when she became ill and for standing by her and their son Redmond in their time of greatest need. I seem to remember that their breakup was rather bitter, so I also give them both credit for being able to forgive one another. That’s more than can be said for a lot of celebrity couples.

    As for Jackson, he was undeniably talented, but I too never quite grasped how he became the “King of Pop.” I would bet, also, that if any other 50-year-old man who had never been famous or enormously wealthy acted, dressed, and looked the way Jackson did, and also had been accused of child molestation as many times as Jackson was (even if they were never found guilty), such a person probably would have been treated as an outcast, hounded out of every community he tried to live in, and news of his sudden death would have been greeted with cheers and “good riddance” from the general public instead of mourning.

    The only appropriate response to both these incidents is to pray for the repose of their souls.

  • “such a person would have been treated as an outcast, hounded out of every community he tried to live in”

    Well, maybe not. Elaine, have you ever visited San Francisco? Take a walk through the Tenderloin and you’ll easily spot at least 10 characters who make the late MJ look like a Rotary Club president.

  • “look like a Rotary Club president.”

    As a three time Rotary Club President Donna, I’m afraid you are right!

  • I don’t have an emotional interest in either story…

    I do however have a narrative interest in MJs story. He’s too eccentric of a character to not be curious how he ran his life into the ground.

  • No interest; MJ’s music never connected (and his lifestyle excited only distant pity), and Jill was my least-favorite Angel.

    Celebrity status will doubtless gain extra prayers for the repose of their respective souls, whether heartfelt or simply dutiful. Concerning MJ, at least, that may be the only good thing celebrity ever got him.

  • No, Donna, I haven’t been to S.F. (wouldn’t mind visiting the more scenic and decent parts someday, if I won the lottery or a free vacation to anywhere. I did visit L.A. once). Perhaps I should have amended my comment to say he would have been an outcast in communities other than certain major cities on the Left Coast :)

    What I had in mind primarily was the child abuse accusations made against him and the double standard that seems to be showing itself in this case.

    Normally, any time Joe or Jane Average is accused of any kind of child abuse in Anytown, U.S.A., if the local paper even accepts online comments concerning the story, 99 percent of them will be rants about what a scumbag this person is and how they should be executed on the spot, etc. The same comments would likely be made even if the person were acquitted in court; most people would probably still believe he had to have done “something” wrong to have even gotten arrested. Needless to say, the sentiment would be even stronger if such accusations occurred more than once.

    Also, I’d be willing to bet that some of these people who idolize Michael Jackson so much and firmly believe he didn’t do anything wrong, or that if he did it was merely because he was victim of abuse himself (I have NO idea whether that’s true or not), probably look at any man in a Roman collar with extreme suspicion.

  • Normally, any time Joe or Jane Average is accused of any kind of child abuse in Anytown, U.S.A., if the local paper even accepts online comments concerning the story, 99 percent of them will be rants about what a scumbag this person is and how they should be executed on the spot, etc. The same comments would likely be made even if the person were acquitted in court; most people would probably still believe he had to have done “something” wrong to have even gotten arrested.

    I am not sure your proportions are correct, but that phenonomenon is real and disturbing. A large fraction of your neighbors just do not belong on juries anytime, anyplace, anywhere.

  • I guess I was much more upset over the Fawcett thing.She was part of my early days pop culture and all. I have to say though her special on fighting cancer that aired a couple of days ago was something else

  • I was more upset at Billy Mays dying!

    Here’s a guy who was selling products with enthusiasm at 50, while Jackson spent the later portion of his life spending money he didn’t have or spending other people’s money.

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