Unsurprising Story

Saturday, February 23, AD 2013

 

Hattip to Matt Archbold at Creative Minority Report.  A nun is allegedly involved in vote fraud in Ohio:

 

A nun has been implicated by prosecutors in a troubling case of election fraud, according to local news reports.
It’s been alleged by Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters that Sister Marge Kloos of the Sisters of Charity mailed in an absentee ballot of Sister Rose Marie Hewitt who had reportedly passed away on October 4th of last year.
Deters sent a letter to the Board of Elections that said:

Re: Deceased Voter Rose Marie Hewitt.
Please be advised that sufficient information has been developed with respect to the above mentioned matter to determine that there is probable cause to believe that criminal activity has occurred.

Hewitt had reportedly lived with Sister Marge Kloos, the dean of arts at the College of Mount Saint Joseph. Prosecutor Joe Deters told WCPO that Kloos is being investigated as the person who sent in Hewitt’s ballot.
Sisters of Charity president Sister Joan Cook told reporters that they are cooperating with police.
Sister Marge Kloos has shown strong position on politics in the past. In fact in 2011, Sister Marge Kloos signed a letter reprimanding House Speaker John Boehner for siding with the “reckless” Tea Party. The letter read:

This is a stark choice between responsible leadership that serves the common good and narrow ideology that makes tax cuts for the wealthy our most sacred national priority. As Ohio Catholics, we urge you to reject the reckless path urged by many Tea Party leaders in Congress. Now is the time to seek a compromise that reflects the Catholic values of solidarity with the most vulnerable and prudential judgment.

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14 Responses to Unsurprising Story

  • http://mountphotos.smugmug.com/keyword/sister%20marge%20kloos#!i=1879964409&k=GXHr7jz

    You can see the earlier stages of iron gray hair. No photos of her shoes, but the smart money says sensible.

  • I share the values of economic conservatives and attended Tea Party events in Pennsylvania. I find the letter quote above to be unremarkable.

    It contains fairly moderate language of disagreement. Sending a letter to government officials is even a laudable activity. We’d be a lot better off if more Americans did.

    In and of itself, the quote doesn’t further your argument.

    I’d stick to the voter fraud. That is a despicable behavior whereas disagreeing with us is not.

  • She could sign a thousand letters for all I care G-Veg. I long ago ceased to care what nuns and sisters of heterodox orders do. The letter was cited in the story purely to indicate the political passion that might motivate her.

  • It contains fairly moderate language of disagreement.

    Moderate it may be. It is also festooned with cliches. I would expect better from a college dean (and expect that women religious would not be all that concerned with the minutiae of legislative maneuvering – leave it to the bores on Washington Week in Review, sister).

  • i’m sorry for being a grammar nazi but there’s really nothing wrong with using “Democratic” as an adjective as opposed to “Democrat”

  • Once Democrats refer to themselves as Democratics JDP you might have a point.

  • I am amused by the Democrat obsession with whether or not the word “Democratic” is used rather than “Democrat”. We routinely see Catholic Democrats get far more exercised over the fact that someone referenced their party as the “Democrat Party” than they do by the fact that their Democrat Party favors abortion on demand, same-sex “marriage”, and the overall secularization of our society.

  • lol ok so it wasn’t the best example. (not a Dem BTW)

    Jay Anderson: no that’s fine, it’s just that “Democrat Party’s” used to disparage Democrats as if there isn’t continuity between the “good” old Dems and the new ones. but Democrats have believed in a lot of the stuff they’re criticized for today for a long time — universal healthcare, Keynesian stimulus — and the stuff you mentioned is a logical consequence of pure-form egalitarian liberalism, detached from any traditional moral constraints.

    plus i don’t get the point of it? best i can tell it’s also partially used to say Democratic=/=democratic. but of course that’s what the capitals are for.

  • “plus i don’t get the point of it?”

    It annoys the devil out of partisan Democrats and it reminds us that in no sense is their party democratic.

  • well that’s what capital letters are for. besides democracy just refers to representative vote, not policy.

  • They fail on both points JDP as they amply demonstrated last year at their convention:

  • Wow, a left wing “Catholic” nun committing vote fraud. I hope she gets locked up.

  • It would appear that if God wanted sister Hewitt to vote, she would have been alive to vote. Doing the will of God is called a vocation.

  • i know i’m pedantic on this point. but for instance people refer to the People’s Republic of China without endorsing it/pretending it’s an actual people’s republic. the Democratic Party as currently constituted is a logical endpoint of liberalism detached from any traditional morality so i got no prob referring to their name regularly

Nah, Vote Fraud Isn’t a Problem!

Saturday, February 9, AD 2013

Ever wonder why Democrats push early voting and absentee ballots so hard?  The above video gives you all the explanation you need!

As John Fund notes at National Review Online:

Critics of voter ID and other laws cracking down on voter fraud claim they’re unnecessary because fraud is nonexistent. For instance, Brennan Center attorneys Michael Waldman and Justin Levitt claimed last year: “A person casting two votes risks jail time and a fine for minimal gain. Proven voter fraud, statistically, happens about as often as death by lightning strike.”

Well, lightning is suddenly all over Cincinnati, Ohio. The Hamilton County Board of Elections is investigating 19 possible cases of alleged voter fraud that occurred when Ohio was a focal point of the 2012 presidential election. A total of 19 voters and nine witnesses are part of the probe.

Democrat Melowese Richardson has been an official poll worker for the last quarter century and registered thousands of people to vote last year. She candidly admitted to Cincinnati’s Channel 9 this week that she voted twice in the last election.

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18 Responses to Nah, Vote Fraud Isn’t a Problem!

  • Proven voter fraud… that’s like “credible attacks of humans by healthy wolves,” right?

    Just because a set standard doesn’t catch problems doesn’t mean the problem doesn’t exist. In some cases, the problem is obvious– be it multiple ballots for “Mickey Mouse,” or the various cases of folks’ dogs having a ballot delivered.

  • So let me see if I am understanding this video. The woman actually doesn’t think it’s ILLEGAL to cast more than one vote? And she’s an election worker? Words fail me.

  • Donald.
    This channel 9 interview needs to seen by the masses. The post here is ok, however have you considered you tube placement?
    If it went viral could it help to open some minds that worship the false God?

  • I have stated from the start that there’s no way that Obama was re-elected cleanly. “The Powers That Be” have too much invested in their agenda to let him lose. I just pray that Almighty God allows me to live long enough to see this SOB and the powers behind him brought to justice.

  • I also thought from the beginning that there was fraud. and I have read the accusation of democrats that read like this: “So what! Republicans have done it too!”

    That very sad observation makes me think of Roy Rogers and the “good guys” of old– who wouldn’t draw their guns first, or participate as vigilantes even though the bad guy was easily recognized by his black hat and handlebar mustache– 🙁

    It is always tough to be good, and even tougher when the bad guys seems to being getting away with it.

  • @phillip

    “This channel 9 interview needs to seen by the masses. The post here is ok, however have you considered you tube placement?
    If it went viral could it help to open some minds that worship the false God?”

    Donald got this video from Youtube.

  • @Siobhan

    “I have stated from the start that there’s no way that Obama was re-elected cleanly.”

    Are you implying that Obama would NOT have won if incidents of voter fraud hadn’t occurred? That seems like quite a jump.

  • i don’t know if it is such a jump JL.
    It was a close election, and in addition to the types of voter fraud mentioned in this post that contribute to the “unclean” win, we can also factor in Candy Crowley, 60 MInutes and so on and on.
    I am still amazed by the reports of 100% of voters in some areas voting for Obama…( and that no one has to be identified as a US citizen to vote)

  • Obama won by a wide enough margin that I am fairly confident that fraud did not lead to his victory. Having said that, I do think fraud was wide spread especially in some inner city precincts where turn outs of one hundred percent of all registered voters were claimed. The simple truth is that ballot security is so poor in most of the states in this nation that it is impossible to say just how big a factor fraud is in most elections.

    When events like Republican election monitors being forcibly barred by Democrats in some precincts in Pennsylvania occur, it is hard not to believe that rampant fraud is not taking place.

    http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2012/11/06/penn-judge-orders-reinstatement-of-gop-election-monitors-allegedly-kicked-out-by-dems/

  • Voting machines programmed to flip votes from Romney to Obama which just happen to be in the swing states. Inner city precincts reporting outrageous numbers that were mathematically impossible and which threw their states to Obama. Buses traveling from Chicago to Wisconsin or Ohio to vote in both states. Many non-citizens driven by the unions to polling places. If you want more information, then you’ll have to google it. He only “won” by 5 million votes – which was NOT difficult to pull off. Of course I can’t “prove it”, I just know in my gut that this election stunk to high heaven. We’re talking about a Marxist cabal that has plotted for many years to get where they are. They were not about to let themselves be defeated by the sheeple, that is you and me, who they hold in complete contempt. It’s all part of the demoralization of a people before they can be crushed and subjugated.

  • A hypothesis:

    Harper’s magazine has (on and off) for eight years been humping a story that the Bush campaign stole Ohio’s electoral votes through widespread tabulation fraud in small increments. If my own experience of local politics is representative, this would have required collusion between Republican and Democratic poll inspectors all over the state, and nobody saying a thing John Kerry thought it nonsense.

    Portside discourse in recent years has seemed at time to be dominated by phenomena described by discarded psychoanalytic concepts, e.g. ‘projection’. Are they telling us something?

    Here there and the next place (in Washington State and in Minnesota of all places) you have congressional elections the Democratic Party managed to win when bags of ballots turn up unexpectedly after the election.

    You have this manic refusal to countenance banal identity verification conjoined to the incredible contention that there are millions upon millions of people in this country unable to verify their identity but somehow civically engaged enough to actually cast ballots (in a world where 60% of the population usually does not vote). Do they believe this?

    We have to entertain the possibility that absentee ballot fraud is now a regular part of the Democratic Party’s tool-kit here, there, and the next place.

  • Voting machines programmed to flip votes from Romney to Obama which just happen to be in the swing states.

    I would be very careful about that unless I were sure that the purchasing agents who ordered the machines and the technicians who tested them were corrupted.

    A couple of years back, I read an article by a computer science professor criticizing the introduction of technology in voting tabulation because of the diminished confidence in the ballot. He offered that paper ballots were the most advisable technology for voting.

    (Legal and administrative maneuvers to frustrate voting by servicemen are an open scandal).

  • Here there and the next place (in Washington State and in Minnesota of all places) you have congressional elections the Democratic Party managed to win when bags of ballots turn up unexpectedly after the election.

    There’s also the rather open fraud of registering to vote absentee at both of your houses.

  • A couple of years back, I read an article by a computer science professor criticizing the introduction of technology in voting tabulation because of the diminished confidence in the ballot. He offered that paper ballots were the most advisable technology for voting.

    Wouldn’t it be most practical to have a machine that looks something like an airlines ticket machine, and prints out the choices selected with a detachable tab?

    You check that what it selected is what you want, fold it in half, tear off your tab, drop one in the “I voted” box and the other in the box of actual ballots.

  • “Portside discourse in recent years has seemed at time to be dominated by phenomena described by discarded psychoanalytic concepts, e.g. ‘projection’. Are they telling us something?”

    I have long suspected so Art.

  • Now I am remembering, ca. 1993, it was considered in New York by certain advocacy groups an outrage that applicants for AFDC have their fingerprints taken. They contended this minor nuisance was an intolerable insult to aspirant beneficiaries. One could not but help suspect that those in the employ of these organizations were at pains to prevent certain information from getting into circulation.

  • Canadian living (legally) in Washington gets card from the county informing her that her ballot will arrive by mail…..

Beneath Contempt

Monday, November 26, AD 2012

 

 

Democrats have been stealing elections for a very long time, but lately they have been working a new angle:  exploiting the mentally handicapped for votes.  David Horowitz relates what he learned at a Thanksgiving dinner:

But even knowing this, I was not prepared for a conversation I had at Thanksgiving dinner today with my brother-in-law, Henry, who has lived most of his life in a home for the mentally disabled, and though now in his forties has the intelligence level of a six-year-old.

“Obama saved me,” he said to me out of the blue.

“What do you mean?”

“I voted for him for president and now he’s saving me.”

I was taken aback by these words, since Henry had no idea who Obama was, or what a president might be, and would be unable to fill out a registration form let alone get to the polling place by himself. So I asked him how he knew that and how he had registered and cast his vote. In halting, impeded speech he told me that the people who take care of him at the home filled out “the papers” to register him to vote, told him how Obama cared for him, even taught him the Obama chants, and then took him to the polling place to vote. They did the same for all of the mentally disabled patients in their care, approximately sixty in all.

This is so appalling in its contempt for the voting process, which is the very foundation of our democracy, and in its cynical exploitation of my brother-in-law and the other patients in the home, many of whose mental capacities are even more limited than his that I am at a loss for words to express it. I hope poll-watching groups like “True the Vote” will comb the rolls of residents at other homes for the mentally disabled, and attempt to stop this particular abuse. I hope that people who care about our country will make electoral fraud a focus of their political efforts, and work to protect the integrity of the voting process.

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22 Responses to Beneath Contempt

  • The looters and tyrants need to experience the righteous antipathy of millions of producers and taxpayers.

  • There are a mess of dubious characters in the helping professions.

  • The National Association of Scholars published a report a few years back on how social workers are educated; in a word: scandalously. Now take a look at this from Washington University in St. Louis, which has a purportedly highly rated program:

    http://gwbweb.wustl.edu/Admissions/MSWProgram/Pages/CurriculumandCourseOverview.aspx

    Examining their course lists, can you figure what these dames are being trained to do that would not and could not be covered in programs in public administration or clinical psychology?

    One project the starboard side might get cracking on on the state level is euthanizing this ideologized pseudo-profession.

  • “The National Association of Scholars published a report a few years back on how social workers are educated; in a word: scandalously.”

    Agreed! I have written about this:

    http://the-american-catholic.com/2010/07/29/intolerance-in-the-name-of-tolerance/

    One of the main problems with academia is that too many areas of study on too many campuses are basically leftist politics with a patina of academic gibberish.

  • (Don’s wife Cathy here) Art, our daughter is applying for admission to college, and has been indicating that long-term, she’d like to become a school counselor. (No comment on whether we think that’s the best career option for her.) Don & I insisted that she had to think shorter-term as well, and pick an undergrad major which would make her employable, so she’s going with elementary education.
    Anyway, the Children, Youth & Families concentration in that Wash U MSW program description you linked to sounds an awful lot like the M.S. programs in educational psychology and developmental psychology I looked up when investigating what additional coursework our daughter would need after teacher certification to qualify as a school counselor. The main difference I can spot is that the MSW program sounds “squishier” and more advocacy/policy/agenda-oriented, even in the direct practice tracks that I looked at. It looks like the MSW program at Wash U wants to turn out social workers who not only have a certain set of skills, but also all fit a certain ideological mold.

  • Mr Horowitz of all people should know the Left’s playbook – what you pro-lifers want to deny votes to the mentally different? The chance to reach for significance, for revenge. What would Jesus say? And a whole swathe of Christians will then fold as a pack of cards.

  • Mrs. McClarey:

    A good reason to major in education is that trade associations, teacher training faculty, and unions have buffaloed state legislatures into making it a requirement for employment in the public schools. Critics of these programs (e.g. Thomas Sowell) say their value-added is undetectable.

    I do hope your daughter has

    1. mastered algebra;

    2. writes grammatical English;

    3. knows the basics of American history, geography, and civics;

    4. selects a school of education which has as its focus courses in practical teaching strategies and not in promoting rancid social ideology (Stanford University and LeMoyne College have been the focus of scandals in this regard, as has NCATE, the accrediting association for teacher-training programs).

    5. selects a decent 2d major and/or is very careful in her selection of courses to fulfill distribution requirements; courses in accounting, statistics, insurance foreign languages, economics, and mathematics are good; art history might be, if it stops at 1918; philosophy might be; social sciences should be avoided unless they are grounded in quantitative methods (or are studying work by Gabriel Almond, Dankwart Rustow, et al).

    6. If you can work in a business major, perhaps a five-year plan is worth it.

    7. Every family should have an engineer. Tell your son or one of your nephews to get cracking.

    Now I will stop being overbearing (which is the moderator’s job in any case).

  • Mr Horowitz of all people should know the Left’s playbook – what you pro-lifers want to deny votes to the mentally different? The chance to reach for significance, for revenge. What would Jesus say? And a whole swathe of Christians will then fold as a pack of cards.

    Martinis for breakfast is a bad habit.

  • (Don’s wife Cathy again) Art, we’ve been trying to talk her into a business-oriented major (f.ex. Computer Information Systems or Accounting), but she hasn’t bitten yet. There are a couple of small Midwestern colleges where our daughter’s test scores & class rank make her overqualified compared to their average freshmen (with decent U.S. News & World Report rankings, and decent results in their Net Price Calculators) where she has a shot at good merit scholarships, and has already been accepted; hopefully they aren’t as P.C.-nuts as larger schools. I’ll be driving her to their merit scholarship interviews myself, so I’ll be able to get an in-person feel for what those colleges are like.

  • I do not know why I was assuming elementary school. If she aims to be a high school teacher, she would need to be subject trained (whether the board of regents requires it or not). Of course, you could persuade her she wants to teach vocational business classes.

    I suspect with accounting there is enough temp work around that she might be able to get out of painting houses in the summer time.

  • Don’t write off an entire career path because of a bad trend among teachers. If you feel called to a particular career, and it’s something that’s marketable and you have an aptitude for, don’t let a few lousy professors push you around. I got a bachelor’s and master’s degree in economics – definitely not a hard science – and didn’t get brainwashed along the way.

    First off, the average teacher doesn’t do a lot of work. He assigns texts and homework, and blathers in front of the class for a set period of time. The student regurgitates all over a midterm and a final, and maybe has to write a paper. The paper can be unorthodox as anything, but if it’s about one of the foundational texts or theories in the field, the teacher will usually accept it – and every field has some decent thought within it. Even if the teacher doesn’t like the student (and you’d have to be pretty obnoxious to get noticed in a classroom of 500 kids), with grade inflation being what it is, the student might get a B- instead of an A. Big deal. The student will still end up graduating with a 3.2 GPA.

    You might be able to find a school that has a reputation for not contaminating the students, although each teacher is different, and in a lot of cases it’s the TA who’s doing the teaching. But once you get out of the classroom, there will be a wide range of thinkers in the field. And most employers don’t care about a particular person’s ideology as long as they don’t make anyone’s life difficult and fill out the paperwork correctly. So don’t fret over a particular major.

    Actually, if I could offer one piece of advice to beginning college students, it’d be to take a minor as well as a major.

  • Pinky,

    As a student or professors my wife and I have been associated with six colleges/universities (a large state school, a large Catholic University and four small liberal arts schools). The experience you describe (professor who does little work, TAs grading, large classes, etc.) only really exist at research universities. At small colleges, professors teach 4-6 lectures per school year, do most of the grading, and, in many cases, even teach science labs. At those schools it is really difficult to ‘hide’ from the professors. My wife is currently a tenure track professor in biology at a college in the Northwest and she knows every student in the ‘large’ lecture of sixty – the largest lecture of any class at the school.

  • (Don’s wife Cathy again) The 2 colleges which have already accepted our daughter for admission are both tiny, as colleges go ( <1,500 students each) so, if she attended one of them, the profs would certainly get to know her. On the other hand, the other schools she's waiting to hear back from on admission decisions range from 2,000-35,000 students each, so there's certainly a chance she'd end up at a "Mega-U".
    As to majors/minors, our daughter is definitely interested in at least a minor in addition to a major. The way she's changed her mind each year during high school on what she'd like to major in, though, she may well change her mind again by the time she has to officially declare a major. It had better be something which will make her employable with just a BA/BS, though!

  • I got a bachelor’s and master’s degree in economics – definitely not a hard science – and didn’t get brainwashed along the way.

    Economics is not sociology. It is a social science in actuality, not in aspiration. I think the same deal applies in demography, but undergraduate courses in demography are rare. One might hope a future generation will return American history, anthropology, sociology, and social psychology to a state where practicing them is not functionally dependent upon signing on to a Marxist, feminist, or multi-culti catechism.

    By the way, I did most of my undergraduate study at research universities. There was a minor kerfuffle at the engineering school at one place when students were assigned a TA who spoke only some odd dialect of Chinese. Otherwise, I do not recall much trouble with professors sloughing off. TAs graded exercises in large survey courses with scores of students enrolled, but the faculty did all their own lectures and relied on TAs only for end-of-the-week discussion sessions which amounted to about 25% of class time. Professors did the whole shebang for seminars and lecture courses of ordinary enrollment. I’ve a family member on the faculty of George Mason, a large research university. He usually teaches a 2-2 schedule because he commonly has important administrative responsibilities in addition to bringing in masses of grant money and having published several dozen papers in recent decades. He puts his all into his teaching as well, and would have been overqualified at the small college I attended (which makes a point of being a redoubt of ‘scholar/teachers’).

  • It had better be something which will make her employable with just a BA/BS, though!

    I hope that little college has an accounting department.

  • Maybe Pravda (Russian for “truth”) needs to update its Obama re-election coverage.

    Quoted:

    ‘Recently, Obama has been re-elected for a 2nd term by an illiterate society . . . .”

    Truth.

  • (Don’s wife Cathy again)
    “I hope that little college has an accounting department.”
    Both of them do, Art, and they both emphasize internship opportunities – especially the one that’s outside our own state, and approx. a 1/2-hour drive away from a major Midwestern city.

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  • Don, to get back to the topic of using the mentally handicapped as vote generating tools for the democrats. I too have an autistic son who will likely end up in a group home when my husband and I are no longer physically up to caring for him. I have also worked as a county caseworker for intellectually disabled individuals who live in group homes. As a caseworker I was required to ask each individual on my caseload every year whether they wished to register to vote. If yes, I was required to see that they got registered. If they said no, I had to have them sign a paper stating their disinterest in registering, and turn these in to my supervisor who would presumably turn a record in to the state. As you say, there is no competency criteria. So long as the individual nods or gives some other sign that means yes, he can register to vote. He can sign with an X or other mark if he can not write his name, as long as there is a witness.
    In theory this law protects an individual who has a mild degree of mental retardation but functions with a fair degree of independence. Some of these individuals hold jobs, follow the news on tv and yes, have as much a right and ability to cast a vote as any “normal” person with a high school degree and the same susceptibility to persuasion by the media, by relatives, etc.
    In practice, the abuses mentioned in the post are widespread. I live in a conservative rural county, and so my impression is that mentally disabled individuals from groups homes are as likely to be persuaded by caregivers to vote republican as democrat. But yes, it’s a terrible situation. It would be a rare poll watcher who could get up the nerve to be seen as “supressing” the vote of a disabled person.
    If your autistic son does not advance beyond a child’s intellectual capacity by adulthood, I recommend that you obtain legal guardianship when he turns 18. Guardianship does not accrue to you automatically just because you are the parent. Your son is considered a legally competent person once he turns 18 no matter how severely handicapped. If you do not get yourself named as guardian, there is nothing to stop a caregiver from manipulating him into voting for whomever the caregiver determines is the best candidate for “disabilities rights”
    At least this is the case here in Pennsylvania, and I suspect it is the same elsewhere.

  • “If your autistic son does not advance beyond a child’s intellectual capacity by adulthood, I recommend that you obtain legal guardianship when he turns 18. Guardianship does not accrue to you automatically just because you are the parent. Your son is considered a legally competent person once he turns 18 no matter how severely handicapped. If you do not get yourself named as guardian, there is nothing to stop a caregiver from manipulating him into voting for whomever the caregiver determines is the best candidate for “disabilities rights”
    At least this is the case here in Pennsylvania, and I suspect it is the same elsewhere.”

    I had my wife, myself and my autistic son’s twin brother appointed by the court as guardians shortly after his 18th birthday. After my wife and I are gone, the plan is for him to live with his brother who is planning to join me in my law firm after he graduates from law school. From what I have seen of state institutions and group homes I will do whatever it takes to make certain, as far as I am able, that my autistic son will always live with family.

  • (Don’s wife Cathy again) “If your autistic son does not advance beyond a child’s intellectual capacity by adulthood, I recommend that you obtain legal guardianship when he turns 18.”
    That’s just what we did, Daria. In fact, we just had to file our first 3-year report on the guardianship, and we’ll all be appearing at a hearing on that report during Christmas break (when our son’s twin & co-guardian will be home from college).

  • One other thing you did not ask for:

    Your daughter should lay off any vocational discipline with high rates of innovation until her children are of such an age that she expects not to be departing the labor force until retirement. A lady IT tech of my acquaintance once lamented that things she had learned just three years earlier were now useless. You cannot come and go with IT.