Let’s Pretend and the Gods of the Copybook Headings

Monday, July 6, AD 2015

Well, the Greeks rejected austerity measures in a referendum yesterday 61% to 39%.  This should mean that Greece leaves the Eurozone but I doubt it.  My guess is that the powers that be in the EU, afraid that the whole Euro edifice will crash, along with their phony baloney jobs, will craft together some sort of last minute mini-bailout to keep the Greeks in the Eurozone for a bit longer, making the ultimate collapse of the Eurozone that much more devastating.  What all of this portends of course is the end of an era that is much larger than what happens to a minor Mediterranean economy, or even of the European economy.  We are saying farewell to the era of Let’s Pretend.

Let’s Pretend began back in the ’60’s of the last century when it became a common belief among the intelligentsia of the West that the usual rules, what Kipling called the Gods of the Copybook Headings, that had governed human affairs since the dawn of Man no longer applied.  We are clearly in the end game of this rubbish on stilts as reality keeps intruding.  Summoning money out of thin air eventually comes to a crashing end, welfare states eventually collapse under their own weight, free sex burdens society with kids growing up fatherless and with adults that never grow up at all, imposing a common currency on nations with separate economies, banking systems and disparate cultures is delusional, and the list of collective flights from reality could go at great length.

 

In this end game we have the proponents of our Let’s Pretend Culture assuring us that sex is merely a made up distinction and that marriage includes joining men to men and women to women.  Rather than ushering in a brave new world, this is a dying gasp of an exhausted project of reality denial.  Of course we are not the first generation to engage in such a project.  The lamentable chronicle of human folly and crime is replete with examples of societies collectively taking leave of their senses for a time.  However, reality always wins in the end, and the return of reality is usually attended with the shedding of many human tears and the shedding of much human blood.

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32 Responses to Let’s Pretend and the Gods of the Copybook Headings

  • Meanwhile, over to the East, the Putin bear is planning how he can make a bold move to take advantage of the most weakened western world since Marx and Lenin. Perhaps, he’ll wait until the UN climate change makes their move for power.

  • Your sentiments ring so true. I hope reality comes soon on a global scale. I’m utterly frightened of the world that my children will face, raising their children.

    Unfortunately for Greece, they got what they have deserved for so long.

    Their economy is a direct result of the peoples decision to vote in a Conmunist government. They don’t know how to manage money. This and the “slack” work ethic of the current working generation produces a complete disastrous outcome.

    And they STILL want handouts instead of a slap of reality ie. the logical and sensible tightening of the belt.

    The powers that be (whoever they claim to be) are complete morons.

  • “They don’t know how to manage money…”

    Ezabelle, I would argue that Marxists (by whatever name) very well know how to manage money and economies, but they seek different outcomes from it. You assume they seek to improve the economic life of its citizens (thereby allowing independence) when in fact they seek to bring everyone down that they might easily be controlled.
    Visit any marine boot camp and you’ll see the process of humbling and thus dependency upon (loyalty to) the government. (Those few who seek to control the masses)
    The key is that there can be no other choice allowed the people–hence, control of communications, indoctrination, and the destruction of western ideals and God’s Church which sets us free.

  • Meanwhile, over to the East, the Putin bear is planning how he can make a bold move to take advantage of the most weakened western world since Marx and Lenin.

    Marx died in 1883 and Lenin in 1924. Somehow I suspect the occidental world of 1942 which had seen a dozen years of economic depression and much of which was under occupation by the Axis powers, was weaker than it is today. (And, while we’re at it, Soviet Russia in 1979 was a more vigorous and threatening power than post-Soviet Russia is today).

  • I would argue that Marxists (by whatever name) very well know how to manage money and economies, but they seek different outcomes from it. You assume they seek to improve the economic life of its citizens (thereby allowing independence) when in fact they seek to bring everyone down that they might easily be controlled.

    Don, see Paul Hollander on this point. There was an implosion in morale among the Soviet managerial stratum when, ca. 1985, it suddenly was possible the disconnected problems in the economy that they knew about themselves. The notion abroad for many decades (in fragments of the occident and in the East Bloc) was that central planning was the way to run an economy for maximum output and broad distribution of benefits. I can show you textbooks and magazine literature that I was reading as late as 1985 singing the praises of ‘indicative planning’ (something different that the comprehensive bureaucratic authoritarian state and society you saw in Soviet Russia, to be sure); at the time, chatter about ‘industrial policy’ was all the rage among a certain sort of journalist-wonk (e.g. Robert Kuttner), among others. Characters like Boris Yeltsin visit the United States and see what’s available in an ordinary American supermarket (without lines out the door a block long) and the jig’s up.

  • “I can show you textbooks and magazine literature that I was reading as late as 1985 singing the praises of ‘indicative planning’ (something different that the comprehensive bureaucratic authoritarian state and society you saw in Soviet Russia, to be sure); at the time, chatter about ‘industrial policy’ was all the rage among a certain sort of journalist-wonk (e.g. Robert Kuttner), among others.”

    This from John Kenneth Galbraith in 1984:

    “Partly, the Russian system succeeds because, in contrast to the Western industrial economies, it makes full use of its manpower.”

  • I recall that a major issue in the USSR circa 1980 was that the managerial class came to understand that none of the metrics it was using to ‘plan’ the economy could be trusted. The need for secrecy and the widespread corruption resulted in informational anarchy. After the collapse the CIA was shocked to find that it’s estimates were too low: it turned out that the Soviet military-industrial complex occupied two-thirds of the total economy! The leadership was dancing in a hall of mirrors of its own making, and they simply could not effectively respond to the Reagan-Thatcher-Wojtyla challenge.

    In a sense the same thing happens in countries like Argentina and Greece with their economic manipulations. In this case it is the value of the currency that is the metric being polluted. The leadership fools itself into believing the value is what they say it is.

  • Whatever any Greek government does will be merely rearranging the deckchairs on the Titanic.
    The Greek birth-rate went into free-fall in the 1980 and the country now has a Total Fertility Rate of 1.34 children per woman. Given that the median age is 43.5 years, there are simply not enough women of child-bearing age to reverse the impending decline of the population.
    No economic nostrums will enable Greece, to cope with a rapidly growing population of dependent elderly. Like Japan, by the end of the century, their language will be spoken exclusively in hell.
    IEven Germany, despite its present prosperity, has a median age of 46.1 and a TFR of 1.38. That may enable them to die out more comfortably and, in the meantime, to purchase some amusements to reduce their boredom and anxiety as their nation sins into the grave.

  • I inteded to write “as their nation sinks into the grave.”

  • After the collapse the CIA was shocked to find that it’s estimates were too low: it turned out that the Soviet military-industrial complex occupied two-thirds of the total economy!

    Can you provide a reference for that? The CIA estimate was revised in 1976 at which time it was calculated that about a quarter of their output was devoted to military uses, rather than one-eighth, which was the previous estimate. Keep in mind, that under conditions of comprehensive national mobilization, a mean about 1/3 of American output was devoted to military uses during the period running from 1940-46. It’s indicative of how vigorous the government was at the time that it was reduced from over 40% to 6.7% in less than two years (1945-47), and the country weathered a severe recession to boot. The federal government ran budget surpluses in FY 1946/47, 1947/48, and 1949/50. (There was a recession in 1949, so there was a deficit in 1948/49). We aren’t the people we used to be.

  • This from John Kenneth Galbraith in 1984: “Partly, the Russian system succeeds because, in contrast to the Western industrial economies, it makes full use of its manpower.”

    If Mrs. McClarey has some time on her hands, you might ask her to produce a Kenneth Galbraith bibliography, omitting everything but refereed research papers in academic journals and working papers with similar content. You could add some monographs if they were historical works incorporating original research. That bibliography will be very, very short, his longevity notwithstanding. The man was an op-ed monster.

  • Gosh yes! 🙂 We all reject austerity don’t we?!
    Is the die cast? What can really be done to alleviate the austerity that is actually in our future- not as part of a grand plan, but actual hunger and drop in so called standards of living none the less.

  • And thank you for Kipling- pretty much unknown to me before TAC– and for Bill Whittle commentary

  • Alas, I am too young to be able to count on being dead before the inevitable Mother of All
    Market Corrections happens. The Chinese stock market has lost almost $3 trillion in
    value in the past two weeks, and keeps dropping. With Greece’s woes, the crash of the
    Eurozone is that much closer– and as intertwined as our economy is with the rest of the
    world, no one with any sense could think that we’ll escape unscathed here in the USA,
    where we’ve doubled our national debt in the past 6 years, and our financial industry
    is wildly, unsustainably over leveraged.
    .
    I’d be a bit less pessimistic if it weren’t for the thought that the oncoming crisis will be
    handled by the corrupt, feckless, malignant crop we currently have in Washington.

  • Russia may be weaker, but we are even more so–having lost all will to oppose evil and become quasi-socialists ourselves.
    It is wise to remember about the Putinized Russia, that it is the weak and wounded Tiger that becomes the man eater, and while the more noisy rattler makes loud noises warning you of danger, the silent cottonmouth or copperhead bites before you become aware of the danger.
    Russia, weak or otherwise, controls the life-blood fuel of Europe and has many times already intimidated her when they get advantage. They’ll not ignore the EU’s economic crisis and fail to see the best opportunity in many a year to make a move….while we wage war on CO2.

  • Alas, I am too young to be able to count on being dead before the inevitable Mother of All Market Corrections happens. The Chinese stock market has lost almost $3 trillion in
    value in the past two weeks, and keeps dropping. With Greece’s woes, the crash of the
    Eurozone is that much closer– and as intertwined as our economy is with the rest of the
    world, no one with any sense could think that we’ll escape unscathed here in the USA,


    China has been nursing bubbles in asset prices for years. Nothing surprising and nothing all that troubling unless their traders are up to their eyeballs in margin. The American stock market is only mildly over-valued. Greece accounts for only 2% of the Eurozone’s production and what has been happening is very well telegraphed. The real problem might be if there is a panic re Spanish, Portuguese, and Italian debt. There hasn’t been much change in the CDS spreads on the Spanish and Italian debt of late, just some flux. There has been some increase in the spreads on Portuguese debt, though the spreads are not any higher than they were last year.

  • Russia may be weaker, but we are even more so–having lost all will to oppose evil and become quasi-socialists ourselves. It is wise to remember about the Putinized Russia, that it is the weak and wounded Tiger that becomes the man eater, and while the more noisy rattler makes loud noises warning you of danger, the silent cottonmouth or copperhead bites before you become aware of the danger. Russia, weak or otherwise, controls the life-blood fuel of Europe and has many times already intimidated her when they get advantage. They’ll not ignore the EU’s economic crisis and fail to see the best opportunity in many a year to make a move….while we wage war on CO2.

    We have a bad elite, typified by the vapid and unscrupulous man who sits in the Oval Office. Some manifestations of that may improve in a year and a half. The notion that ‘we are even weaker’ I cannot credit. We have enormous productive capacity we did not have in 1941 and our economy and military dwarf in size that of every other country in the world bar China. Putin is engaged in a game of harassing countries on the Russian border. This is an expense and an irritant for the Ukraine. Donetsk is a long way from Warsaw, however. As for what Russia ‘controls’. Russia’s the most important component of the international export market in fuels, accounting for 12% of the total. They are also dependent on fuel exports for 70% of their foreign exchange. I tend to be skeptical they’re going to be running a general embargo on the rest of Europe.

  • In the long run this is probably good. Greece will be forced to put it’s house in order, kicking and screaming for sure. But the short run will be painful.

    ==========================

    Don

    On different note for your Kipling series, some recently put up a good video of the “Mary Gloster.”

    http://eclecticmeanderings.blogspot.com/

  • I do not believe the left are in a “let’s pretend” mode. That would be indicative of a modicum of innocence/virtue.
    .
    .
    I believe that from day one, say 1913 in the USA, the left’s modus has been let’s fabricate problems, tear it down, and replace it with what we control. It’s about power. It’s not about reform or change.
    .
    And, I believe the closest the left comes to analyzing the consequences of any ill-conceived experiment is a fleeting thought that “We will have control. How bad things be?”
    .
    Scratch a leftist and you find a totalitarian. As Gibbon wrote regarding Augustus, they are intent on reducing every one to an equal level of powerlessness, poverty and desperation so that they can readily control all.
    .
    When in the course of human events . . .

  • “Can you provide a reference for that? (After the collapse the CIA was shocked to find that it’s estimates were too low: it turned out that the Soviet military-industrial complex occupied two-thirds of the total economy!)

    Art, my recollection is that I saw that in a U.S. Naval Institute publication, probably a Proceedings issue.

  • “…as their nation sins into the grave.”
    MPS, it makes perfect sense that way too.

  • .
    “Scratch a leftist and you find a totalitarian. As Gibbon wrote regarding Augustus, they are intent on reducing every one to an equal level of powerlessness, poverty and desperation so that they can readily control all.”

    Absolutely correct–CONTROL is what it is all about–and DAMN the consequences to anyone.

  • TomD wrote, “…as their nation sins into the grave.”
    MPS, it makes perfect sense that way too.”
    Doesn’t it just?

  • Barbara Gordon wrote, “Absolutely correct–CONTROL is what it is all about–and DAMN the consequences to anyone.”

    Does no one read Carl Schmitt anymore?

    Schmitt, a Catholic conservative, argues that every realm of human endeavour is structured by an irreducible duality. Morality is concerned with good and evil, aesthetics with the beautiful and the ugly, and economics with the profitable and the unprofitable. In politics, the core distinction is between friend and enemy. That is what makes politics different from everything else.

    The political comes into being when groups are placed in a relation of enmity, where each comes to perceive the other as an irreconcilable adversary to be fought and, if possible, defeated. “Every religious, moral, economic, ethical, or other antithesis transforms itself into a political one if it is sufficiently strong to group human beings effectively, according to friends and enemy.” “The political is the most intense and extreme antagonism,” Schmitt wrote. War is the most violent form that politics takes , but, even short of war, politics still requires that you treat your opposition as antagonistic to everything in which you believe.

    Of course, he denies the possibility of neutral rules that can mediate between conflicting positions; for Schmitt there is no such neutrality, since any rule – even an ostensibly fair one –represents the victory of one political faction over another and is merely the temporarily stabilised result of past conflicts.

  • “Every religious, moral, economic, ethical, or other antithesis transforms itself into a political one if it is sufficiently strong to group human beings effectively, according to friends and enemy.”

    That’s a non-falsifiable proposition, MPS.

  • I recognize that “friend and enemy” duality– it’s a rephrasing of the Tribalism theory of human interaction. All for those inside of the group(classically, tribe- your relatives), nothing of value for those outside.

    It’s an observation on human nature, one that Christianity calls on us to overcome. (by expanding to all people, but that’s still overcoming)

  • Foxfier

    of course, Schmitt insists that Internal order can only be successdfully imposed as the necessary means of pursuing external conflicts. For him, a world government is impossible, for humanity has no enemy.

  • Schmitt insists that Internal order can only be successdfully imposed as the necessary means of pursuing external conflicts.

    So, imaginative construction replaces actual political sociology.

  • Art Deco wrote, “So, imaginative construction replaces actual political sociology.”

    As a jurist and political theorist, Schmitt is primarily concerned with the analysis of political concepts, their logical implications and their coherence.

    Every political community is based on a constitutive distinction between insiders and outsiders or friends and enemies. A democratic political community, as much as any other, must therefore rest on some marker of identity and difference that can ground an exclusive form of political equality which will only apply to insiders. His insistence that the political equality that constitutes a political community cannot be based on the non-exclusive equality of all human beings as moral persons, is analytical, not empirical.

  • As a jurist and political theorist, Schmitt is primarily concerned with the analysis of political concepts, their logical implications and their coherence.

    So what? The theoretical is insufficient. It is merely a prelude to the sociological and the historical.

    Every political community is based on a constitutive distinction between insiders and outsiders or friends and enemies.

    Please note the following: your first pairing is not coterminous with your second pairing; elegant assertion is not the same thing as demonstration, whether Carl Schmitt does it or you do.

  • Was not Schmitt excommunicated and effectively an atheist from his mid-twenties on? And while I dislike, generally, to exclude thinkers due to their associations- what wisdom could come from a man like Schmitt who helped to protect, justify and nurture the Nazis? Few read Schmitt, at least directly, anymore because he was barred from the academic world at his refusal to go through de-Nazification. Perhaps it is better for our us that this is so.

  • Hmmmmm asks, “[W]hat wisdom could come from a man like Schmitt who helped to protect, justify and nurture the Nazis?”

    What led Schmitt to collaborate with the Nazis from March 1933 to December 1936 was, above all, concern with order Along with many German conservatives, Schmitt saw the choice as either Hitler or chaos. But, political thought should not be evaluated on the basis of the authors’ personal political judgements.

    Acute theoretical analysis is perfectly compatible with poor practical judgment.

Klavan: Obama Fantasy Ending

Saturday, October 6, AD 2012

Andrew Klavan at City Journal explains how the media creation Obama ended with the debate this week:

The Obama of the imagination is the media’s Obama. Out of their fascination with the color of his skin and their mindless awe at his windy teleprompted rhetoric, they constructed a man of stature and accomplishment. Now, with the White House on the line, they’re waging an ongoing battle against the undeniable evidence that he has never been, in fact, that man. The result in these quadrennial autumn days has been media coverage of a fantasy election, an election in the news that may bear no relation whatsoever to the election as it is. Polls consistently skewed to favor Democrats in percentages beyond any reasonable construct of reality have left us virtually ignorant of the state of the race. Orchestrated frenzies over alleged gaffes by Mitt Romney have camouflaged an imploding Obama foreign policy, an Obama economy threatened by a new recession, and an Obama campaign filled with vicious personal attacks and lies.

Governor Romney’s unprecedented dismantling of the president in their first debate—an encounter so one-sided it reminded me of the famous cartoon in which Godzilla meets Bambi, with predictable results—was surprising only for Romney’s warmth and clarity. Obama’s hapless fumbling, bad temper, and inarticulate inability to defend his record were actually thoroughly predictable. They were simply facets of the man as he truly is, unfiltered by the imagination of his media supporters: a man who has succeeded, really, at almost nothing but the winning of elections; a man who cannot distinguish between his ideology and life; a man who does not seem to know how the machinery of the world actually works.

Fantasy is a powerful thing, but reality will out. Perhaps by Election Day, the public will have awakened from the media’s dream.

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5 Responses to Klavan: Obama Fantasy Ending

  • Today’s local copybook front page: “Jobs Report Boosts Obama”

    – and the dyed in the wool D’s kids have moved out of the area to find their fortunes
    – or are in government employ
    – and many more remain paid for existing
    – many not looking for employment

  • Excellent article, many very valid points. I can’t help but wonder how much a Romney resurgence can be derailed by good job numbers. Hope that someone with some media “bandwidth” can point out the significant decline in jobless, 8.1 to 7.8 if I remember correctly, with only a moderate growth in jobs, 114,000, means many people have exited the job market. Wonder why? (uttered sarcastically). Seems that perhaps they should also note that 16,000 manufacturing jobs disappeared. My understanding of that is that we remain one (on a macro level) global economy and our manufacturing workforce is not competitive, and not being politically correct doesn’t change the facts. Just ask Boeing why they are in SC. US policy, current and past continues to force jobs offshore and Obama’s policies continue to exacerbate that problem.

    PS – Thanks for the blue type. It is, for me, a huge improvement.

  • Obama it seems to me is completely deflated and in his mind has come to realise that he is under qualified for the job. The Administration is going through the motions now, which accounts for the daft decision to send an Islamic supremacist to the OSCE, I do not think there will be any kind of October surprise. Whether this is enough for Romney to win is another matter, but the spectacle of Obama looking sad and downcast for a couple of minutes with his chin set grimly is indicative of a person who realises that he is out of depth and that harsh reality beckons. I’ve been there before, such a pose cannot be simulated.

  • Phenomenal. I just read this at City Journal. The stars are aligning.

The Gods of the Copybook Headings Provide The Commentary

Tuesday, August 9, AD 2011

AS I PASS through my incarnations in every age and race,
I make my proper prostrations to the Gods of the Market Place.
Peering through reverent fingers I watch them flourish and fall,
And the Gods of the Copybook Headings, I notice, outlast them all.

We were living in trees when they met us. They showed us each in turn
That Water would certainly wet us, as Fire would certainly burn:
But we found them lacking in Uplift, Vision and Breadth of Mind,
So we left them to teach the Gorillas while we followed the March of Mankind.

We moved as the Spirit listed. They never altered their pace,
Being neither cloud nor wind-borne like the Gods of the Market Place,
But they always caught up with our progress, and presently word would come
That a tribe had been wiped off its icefield, or the lights had gone out in Rome.

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9 Responses to The Gods of the Copybook Headings Provide The Commentary

  • “when all men are paid for existing and no man pays for his sin”

    I always have a hard time reading poems and I really don’t know why. Well maybe that speaks to something about me. This definately speaks about what is currently going on…

  • This poem needed the date of publication!! So I looked it up:

    Published in October 1919 when the poet was 53 years old, “The Gods of the Copybook Headings” has proved enduringly popular, despite the fact that copybooks disappeared from schoolrooms in Britain and America during, or shortly after World War 2. A copybook was an exercise book used to practice one’s handwriting in. The pages were blank except for horizontal rulings and a printed specimen of perfect handwriting at the top. You were supposed to copy this specimen all down the page. The specimens were proverbs or quotations, or little commonplace hortatory or admonitory sayings — the ones in the poem illustrate the kind of thing. These were the copybook headings.

  • “… and the burnt Fool’s bandaged finger goes wabbling back to the Fire; …The gods of the Copybook Headings with terror and slaughter return!”

    Rudyard Kipling handles the ‘history repeats itself’ idea without going blue in the face.

    This poem so fits the speech above, mixer included. Our problem doesn’t appear to be debt reduction according to the Copybook, because we have to agree to continue to support results of natural disasters, and then there are those high payroll taxes that prevent us from going to market, then … (how unspeakably base to use this) wages of war (for what battery element) in current news as final emphasis.

    I was glad for the mixer problem on the speaker, but not amused for the 10 minutes.

    I worry about long it will be before some handling of debt reduction (balancing the budget for a CHANGE) happens. Would it be forgotten if London’s events (are they related to other 2011 uprisings?) moved across the ocean.

  • Robert-
    I generally have the same issue. Kipling has always been an exception, starting with “Female of the Species.”

  • “Female of the Species.”

    My late formidable mother’s favorite poem!

  • Well said Hank!

    “His vows are lightly spoken,
    His faith is hard to bind,
    His trust is easy broken,
    He fears his fellow-kind.
    The nearest mob will move him
    To break the pledge he gave –
    Oh, a Servant when he Reigneth
    Is more than ever slave!”

  • Ouch– well struck, Hank, Donald. The line about Throws the blame on some one else. is especially painful in light of that “look what happens when you type ‘obama blames’ into google” thing.

  • I am most impressed, Don, that you found this poem to epitomise the “ramblings” of the Obamessiah.
    I have never read much Kipling, apart from some of his militaristic writings, and his Indian conection – Gunga Din etc.
    But I find,
    “That a dog returns to his vomit, and the sow returns to her mire,
    “And the burnt fools finger bandaged goes wabbling back to the fire.”
    particularly poignant.
    I listened to Obama after I had listened to Michele Bachman.
    “WOW” – what a woman. She leaves Obama for dead – and she never had a teleprompter 😉

    The US has to get back to its manufacturing and leading design base that made it famous just a few decades ago. Get the design and efficiency right, the price doesn’t matter. Back in the 60’s 70′ sand 80’s the world loved US products. Sure, the cost of labour is critical, but design, quality and efficiency of scale does make a difference. Get rid af the crazy Union control, take a bit of a dip, and ALL the people will benefit.
    (My 2 cents worth)
    The US rating is now the same as NZ – AA+ – its not all bad. 🙂
    .

Government Monopolies v. Competition

Friday, August 27, AD 2010

Another fine econ 101 video from the Center for Freedom and Prosperity.   That government monopolies like the post office and public schools deliver inferior service at greatly inflated cost is as well established as any fact can be this side of Eternity.  The mystery to me is why we still keep making this fundamental mistake of assuming that a government monopoly is necessary rather than  looking into new measures to reach the goal sought.  The faith in government, especially on the political Left, is as charming in its naivety as it is irrational.

The last century was often a long sad failure to heed the warnings of Rudyard Kipling in his poem The Gods of the Copybook Headings.  I hope this century will not repeat this inability to learn some very simple lessons about the limits of  both government and wishful thinking.

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19 Responses to Government Monopolies v. Competition

  • That government monopolies like the post office and public schools deliver inferior service at greatly inflated cost is as well established as any fact can be this side of Eternity.

    I suppose that is why you and your Tea Party demanded government keep its hands off people’s Medicare.

  • That Obamacare is a dagger pointed at Medicare MZ is something that anyone with two brain cells to rub together could see. That Medicare is also bankrupt is obvious. Makes the prediction of this guy rather prescient:

  • I’m not a Tea Partier, nor do I wish the government to keep its hands off Medicare. Medicare is a government program and I wish they would do a better job of administering it.

    Even Obamacare isn’t a government monopoly. It may be bad or doomed to fail from the start (by design?) and lead to a government monopoly of health care, but it isn’t one as currently constituted.

  • What about government monopolies like the police, courts, and military?

  • In regard to courts restrainedradical, alternative dispute resolution is all the rage in Illinois to relieve crowded court dockets. Mediation with a private mediator is required in all cases involving kids.

    As to police, private security firms are booming because the police in most communities are unable to protect the citizenry.

    In regard to the military, that is one of the few areas in which a government monopoly is warranted, since Letters of Marque and Reprisal to private citizens are just not of much utility in modern warfare.

  • What wrong with private military companies like Blackwater?

  • Funny video. Difference between public and private schools is not the cost but the care of the parent(s) for their children. If you agree to pay for your child’s education in either time, homeschooling, or in tuition, private school, you are vested in the outcome. You care enough to get involved in more then just going to a sporting event that your child is taking part in.

    It is not about the money, it is about the family. So vouchers for terrible parents is a horrendous idea. Too bad you are so far off the mark, but keep the comedy coming. It is fun to watch general lies told by nice pretty people.

    How about next film you use the Joker from Batman? That would be more entertaining.

  • Too bad you are so far off the mark, but keep the comedy coming.

    What is truly funny Steve Zero are people who try to make excuses for truly rotten schools by blaming bad parents. Bad parents didn’t simply magically appear circa 1975, but somehow schools before that time often produced successful students who were cursed with bad parents. Family breakdown is a problem in our society but abysmal public schools do not help the situation.

  • By Steve’s reasoning people who can’t afford private schools or to have a parent staying home to teach are by default bad parents. Their children should be foresaken to the ghetto of piss-poor public schools. Not only is that wrong-headed, it’s sickening.

  • Steve,

    That’s a nice bit of water carrying for the Ruling Class – don’t pay any attention to non-government results! They don’t matter! Just keep shoveling money at the government, we promise we’ll get it right…and when is that new security gate going to be installed around the homes of the elite to keep the public school graduates out?

    The problem with public schools lies in the fact of their “free and compulsory” nature. Every parent should pay at least a nominal, direct fee for the education of their children – and should be allowed to send their child to whatever school they choose and will accept the child. No child should be compelled to attend school after about the 5th grade.

    Do that, and all education problems will resolve themselves.

  • Having dealt some with students in the public school, all the factors are relevant. Poor environments, over-worked or lazy parents, disinterested teachers, etc. There isn’t one magical factor that can turn around public schools; a foundational and gradual change is necessary.

  • I see it in terms of THEM feverishly foisting on US a command economy/central planning bureaucracy to allocate (ration) limited resources among relatively unlimited needs/desires.

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  • so vouchers for terrible parents are a horrendous idea

    SteveO, why not answer three questions to clarify your own thinking and our understanding of it.

    1. What proportion of parents are ‘terrible’?

    2. Why should the selections of non-terrible parents be constrained by the incapacities of the terrible parents?

    3. What criteria do you fancy ‘terrible’ parents will use to select schools?

    4. If the ‘terrible’ parents select for convenience of commuting, how does that leave the aggregate set of selections worse than it is now, given that people are compelled to make use of geographically proximate schools?

  • I suppose that is why you and your Tea Party demanded government keep its hands off people’s Medicare.

    Other than positing the Democratic Congressional caucus’ 1,000+ page bill will generate a state of the world worse than the one we now have, just who among those you usually tangle with says Medicare is untouchable?

  • Dodd, Frank, Obama, Pelosi, Reid must – commoin good – control the economy and install command economy/central planning because the majority are racists, christianist terrorists, or NASCAR-loving retards who are too stupid to know what’s good for them.

    Plus, once the people are reduced to an equal level of dependency and desperation (Obamacare prophecy: before 90% were well-insured; after 100% harmed by government-controlled health) and they are disarmed, it will be easier to control them.

  • T. Shaw,

    That sounds kooky. I will give you this, though. I have stopped believing Paul Krugman and Joseph Stiglitz have been transparent about their aims and motives. Neither is an obscure figure in the economics profession. ‘Tis disconcerting.

  • I’m a kook. Sadly, I’m not alone.

    Krugman . . . I wonder what he calls the planet on which he lives.

  • Another attempt to help Steve0 think clearly.

    “If you agree to pay for your child’s education in either time, homeschooling, or in tuition, private school, you are vested in the outcome.”

    Many low-income (terrible?) parents cannot afford a significant financial investment in their child’s education.

    However, if they could CHOOSE the school where their child attends, then they could make an investment in that particular school that is much more valuable than money.

    They would have the opportunity to invest THEIR CHILD in that school. They will work hard to make sure that investment is successful.