Bill Kristol Reveals Who Is the Fascist

Tuesday, February 14, AD 2017

20 Responses to Bill Kristol Reveals Who Is the Fascist

  • What does he mean the the “deep state?” Does he prefer a strong centralized state? Then I’m glad I cancelled my subscription to The Weekly Standard years ago.

  • Rule by un-elected bureaucrats in positions of great power.

  • He means those who never leave power, no matter who wins the election. Those in the permanent govt caste who move from govt job to govt job with high salaries and who leave oceans of devastation behind them, but never suffer any accountability.

  • Kristol has become a strange caricature of fury and futility. Every appearance lessens his stature, every remark indicts his integrity.

  • Quite the world we live in. Or perhaps, just the old coming back to life. Nothing new under the sun.

  • It’s truly amazing how President Trump causes his opponents to reveal their true selves. At long last, no more pretending. We get to see the leftists for who they really are. Might makes right, nothing more.

  • Think of the deep state as a guerrilla army of unaccountable, unelected bureaucrats that have both the motivations and capabilities to crush a presidency. Then, add in the lying media and crooked academy.

    15 Feb 2017, Damon Linker, “The whole episode is evidence of the precipitous and ongoing collapse of America’s democratic institutions — not a sign of their resiliency. Flynn’s ouster was a soft coup (or political assassination) engineered by anonymous intelligence community bureaucrats. The results might be salutary, but this isn’t the way a liberal democracy is supposed to function.”

  • He should channel President Reagan and the air traffic controllers’ union.

    President Donald J. Trump should fire all Federal intelligence bureaucrats (they’re abject failures, anyhow) and allow them to re-apply for their jobs with required polygraph testing and, if necessary, water-boarding to identify and prosecute find the leakers.

  • One of the curios of these times is that much of the starboard commentariat has revealed itself to have only a tenuous sense of the concerns of their own readership, maybe because they never meet them in the flesh. One grossly amusing activity is to read the comment boxes at National Review whenever their managing editor pens something for the publication. They savage him, often with good reason. Yet, for some reason, Richard Lowry has thought it useful to employ him for the last dozen years and to have gone so far as to eject Mark Steyn from their stable of contributors when this Steorts fellow got his nose out of joint. Lowry also employs Kevin Williamson, who despises ordinary wage earners. Dr. Kristol has recently revealed he has a low opinion of ordinary, just not the frank hostility you get from Williamson. Then there’s George Will, who probably should have retired in 2003.

  • They’re not so much commentators as courtiers, seeking to ingratiate themselves amongst the wielders of actual power. And they truly find the peasants revolting. The only job for the rank and file is to be properly vote-farmed every two years and offered only the carefully-monitored opportunity to man phone banks or stuff envelopes. Heaven forfend they should elect someone who actually suggests they might have legitimate concerns about the economic, social and political order!

  • Last year during the campaign I did ask Rubio and Cruz each about how they could plan to deal with the deep corruption in the various departments if they should be elected. Both were not prepared or did not wish to answer me. I don’t know if anyone could do a better job than Trump is trying to do here. I pray that JMJ will see to it that the evil doers will be revealed. Brennan has always seemed particularly bad to me. Also, remember the smug look on the face of the IRS guy who took Lois Lerner’s place?

  • I think the fellow you’re recalling is John Koskinen, whom Trump has yet to fire. He didn’t take Lois Lerner’s place. He was the bureau chiefe, two or three strata to her north in the organization.

    Cruz and Rubio are both bereft of administrative experience. Cruz, however, is quite principled and he’s a standard deviation’s worth smarter than Rubio. I suspect Cruz would have been very effective at gaming subtle ways to frustrate the lawfare artists on and off the bench. The problem, though, is that the gatekeeper positions in Congress (as well as most of the Republican seats in the Senate and a good many in the House) are held by careerists who have no interest in anything but tossing some candy at their Chamber of Commerce clients. The Senate majority leader is particularly odious. They loathe Cruz because he has actual political principles.

  • I met Bill Kristol many years ago at an event at a clients home in Ct. He was pompous the as he is now, the Trump election has revealed the progressive, liberal he is.

  • Samuel Adams was temperamentally similar to Trump. We are in the midst of a civil war that doesn’t have geographical boundaries. The Donald is something of a counter-revolution against the left, which has absconded with the government via a coup. It remains to be seen who will win.

  • What does he mean the the “deep state?”

    A good example would be the lawfare artists conducting the appalling ‘John Doe’ investigations in Wisconsin. The linchpin was a public prosecutor married to a teachers’ union official.

  • Pingback: Bill Kristol all in for legacy bureaucrats – Blithe Spirit
  • Art – Kevin Williamson is as good as any columnist working today. He’s like a socon PJ O’Rourke. Between him, Nordlinger, and Goldberg, NRO has the best stable around.

  • He was pompous the as he is now, the Trump election has revealed the progressive, liberal he is.

    For crying out loud. He’s a standard-issue BosWash corridor Republican. So’s Lindsay Graham. His problem is that his mind is steeped in his social world. He’s a lapsed professor and magazine editor. His father was an editor. His mother was a professor. All four grandparents were born in the pale of settlement. Both grandfathers by 1930 owned their own businesses. His brother-in-law is a professor. His wife has a Harvard doctorate. His sister met her husband when he was working on her father’s staff. His son-in-law is an opinion journalist. The whole family lives in inner ring burbs in NoVa. The HVAC tech living in Akron is somewhat remote from his mind.

  • John Stuart Mill gives a very good description of the Deep State:

    “The Tsar himself is powerless against the bureaucratic body; he can send any one of them to Siberia, but he cannot govern without them or against their will. On every decree of his they have a tacit veto, by merely refraining from carrying it into effect. In countries of more advanced civilisation and of a more insurrectionary spirit, the public, accustomed to expect everything to be done for them by the State, or at least to do nothing for themselves without asking from the State not only leave to do it, but even how it is to be done, naturally hold the State responsible for all evil which befalls them, and when the evil exceeds their amount of patience, they rise against the government, and make what is called a revolution; whereupon somebody else, with or without legitimate authority from the nation, vaults into the seat, issues his orders to the bureaucracy, and everything goes on much as it did before; the bureaucracy being unchanged, and nobody else being capable of taking their place.”

  • Of course Kristol prefers the ‘deep state’– the only folks breaking rules are the ones he agrees with.

    If it became standard procedure for all of the gov’t employees to abuse their power, he’d be a lot less pleased!

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Quotes Suitable For Framing: Samuel Adams

Tuesday, May 14, AD 2013

Sam Adams

 

 

The liberties of our Country, the freedom of our civil constitution are worth defending at all hazards: And it is our duty to defend them against all attacks. We have receiv’d them as a fair Inheritance from our worthy Ancestors: They purchas’d them for us with toil and danger and expence of treasure and blood; and transmitted them to us with care and diligence. It will bring an everlasting mark of infamy on the present generation, enlightened as it is, if we should suffer them to be wrested from us by violence without a struggle; or be cheated out of them by the artifices of false and designing men. Of the latter we are in most danger at present: Let us therefore be aware of it. Let us contemplate our forefathers and posterity; and resolve to maintain the rights bequeath’d to us from the former, for the sake of the latter. — Instead of sitting down satisfied with the efforts we have already made, which is the wish of our enemies, the necessity of the times, more than ever, calls for our utmost circumspection, deliberation, fortitude, and perseverance. Let us remember that “if we suffer tamely a lawless attack upon our liberty, we encourage it, and involve others in our doom.” It is a very serious consideration, which should deeply impress our minds, that millions yet unborn may be the miserable sharers of the event.

The second appearance of that most fiery of the Founding Fathers in this series, Sam Adams.  His words written in 1771 could just have easily come from a blog today.

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Quotes Suitable for Framing: Samuel Adams

Monday, March 11, AD 2013

2 Responses to Quotes Suitable for Framing: Samuel Adams