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The Case of the Black Baker

It looks as though the Supreme Court (SCOTUS) is finally going to hear about one of those cake controversies. Can a baker legally refuse to make a cake for a gay wedding or not?

If refusing to sell goods & services for a same-sex marriage celebration because of one’s personal beliefs should be illegal, then other similar refusals to other similar events should also be illegal, right?

I wonder if SCOUTS will ever hear the case of the black baker. Have you heard about it? It’s a doozy. A baker, who happens to be black, was asked to bake a nice white cake to help celebrate a successful rally for a local chapter of the Ku Klux Klan. The baker refused to do it. Should he be punished?

The baker is a Christian and does not personally hate the Klan members or white people. He just does not want to be part of this celebration in any way. It’s not that the baker would never bake anything of any Klan member at any event. For example, if a Klan member was celebrating his or her birthday, he would gladly bake the birthday cake. It’s the meaning of a particular event that is the concern; the problem is the ideology behind the “successful Klan rally” and what it represents.

Actually, there is no black baker case that I know of (I made it up), but I suppose there could be such a case one day. The linked article above mentions the following about this kind of issue, “It’s about the rights of gay people to receive equal service in business and not be afraid of being turned away because of who they are. It’s about basic access to public life.”

But could we not say the same about anyone “being who they are” and having “access to public life”? How about a feminist photographer who won’t take pictures at a strip club event? Should she be punished? The photographer believes that strips clubs are immoral and does not want to patriciate in the event. If a particular stripper wanted a professional headshot photo done, the photographer would gladly do it, but nothing for the strip club event. Could we not say the strippers are just being who they are and the photographer is unjustly denying them public access to photographic services?

In the end, it’s about the principle, not the person. The difference is vast. The more our society accepts transcendent things, like right vs. wrong, as only opinions, the more we will accept a kind of soft tyranny where the government takes on the role of “moral compass”. Tragically, this false compass now tells us that homosexual inclinations and actions are part of ones intrinsic identity, just like race or gender.

They will tell us what is just and what is unjust, fair or unfair and you will comply or be punished. Religious liberty is a founding principle of the U.S. and watching its own citizens leading the charge against people of faith into this oppression may be the saddest part of the whole mess.

6

Scouting in a Fractured American Culture

The New York Times runs an article about how the national leaders of the Boy Scouts of America are seeking to address concerns about shrinking membership as they celebrate 100 years of boy scouting in the US. The number of boy scouts has declined 42% since it’s peak in 1978, with 2.8 million boys currently in the Scouts.

To judge from the commentariat at the Times, you would think this is entirely the result of the BSA remaining firm in their ban of gay scout leaders and statement that “homosexual conduct is inconsistent with obligations in the Scout Oath.” Not to mention saying that boys who refuse to recite the Scout Oath because of its references to God and reverence may simply not have a place in the program. Commenters claiming to be Eagle Scouts line up one after another in the comments to announce that no son of theirs will ever be a member of the Scouts while it remains homophobic and theocratic.

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17

Intolerance in the Name of Tolerance

Hattip to Ed Morrissey at Hot Air.  In modern society those who prate the most about tolerance often tend to be the most intolerant.   Case in point, what is happening to Jennifer Keeton, a grad student at Augusta State College, studying to be a school counselor.  She is a Christian and believes that homosexual conduct is wrong.  Her faculty has decreed that she must undergo “sensitivity” (read re-education a la the Red Chinese) training to alter her views on homosexuality.  It was suggested that she go to a local gay pride march among other activities.

The Alliance Defense Fund, the same group representing Dr. Ken Howell, who ran afoul of the thought police at the U of I, is representing Keeton.  Go here to read about the lawsuit they have filed on her behalf.

Shockingly, a federal judge dismissed a lawsuit brought by a grad student, Julea Ward, at Eastern Michigan University who was faced with precisely the same situation facing Keenan.  Go here to read the details at the blogprof.  Go here to read the Alliance Defense Fund’s, which represented Ms. Ward, overview of the case and their intent to appeal the decision.

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