Insider Coup?

Thursday, March 9, AD 2017

 

 

We are four years down the road and Pope Benedict, who allegedly resigned from the papacy in February 2013 for health reasons, is still alive and kicking, and the mystery surrounding his abrupt resignation remains as deep as ever:

Archbishop Luigi Negri who says he has visited Pope Benedict “several times” since his resignation in 2013, is the only Italian bishop to have ever participated in the annual pro-life march in Rome. Negri resigned as archbishop of Ferrara-Comacchio in February after reaching the mandatory retirement age of 75.

In an article published Monday by news outlet Rimini 2.0, Archbishop Negri said that while he has little knowledge of the inner workings of the Curia, “I am certain that the truth will emerge one day showing grave liability both inside and outside the Vatican.”

“It is no coincidence that in America, even on the basis of what has been published by Wikileaks, some Catholic groups have asked President Trump to open a commission of inquiry to investigate whether the administration of Barack Obama exerted pressure on Benedict,” he said. It remains shrouded in mystery for now, he said, “but I am sure that those responsible will be found out.”

Concluding the point, he said that as he approaches his death the first question he will ask St. Peter will be “exactly about this issue.”

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29 Responses to Insider Coup?

  • Here’s the letter from certain conservative Catholics to President Trump:

    https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/articles/item/3001-did-vatican-attempt-to-influence-u-s-election-catholics-ask-trump-administration-to-investigate

    Yes, I firmly believe that heretics in the Church and the Democratic Party are in alliance.

  • I’m thinking President Trump will have eight years . . .

  • Dear Benedict’s closest relatives apart from his nonagenarian brother are in Australia. I do wish someone would spirit him out of the Vatican and into their home.

  • This is most likely true and I wish more Catholics would face this and also since he still wears the white and carries still the Papal titles that means HE is still the only valid Pope NOT FRANCIS who was canvassed at the so called 2013 Conclave.

  • Politics of the Paranoid Catholic Style?

  • Pingback: Canon212 Update: The Big Wheel’s Turning Against False Francis – The Stumbling Block
  • “Politics of the Paranoid Catholic Style?”

    “Politics of the Paranoid Catholic Style?” Smears are weak and are not rebuttal, Ernst.

  • If it truly wasn’t for health reasons, and he was “forced” out, than it calls into question Francis’ election. A prelate can’t be forced out of office. If Cardinal Ratzinger was forced out, he would still be Pope and Francis would be an anti-Pope and what a mess we would be in.

  • If it was blackmail, what did Pope Benedict do or fail to that would make him susceptible to blackmail?

  • Who might that be? And how could that make the pope so susceptible to blackmail that he would abdicate the papacy?

  • His brother is a decided possibility.

  • What about his brother Msgr. Georg Ratzinger is blackmailible? The Regensberg boys choir sex abuse scandal? That news is already out there. Surprisingly, it got little press attention. He was not accused of being involved, but accused of knowing about it not coming forward.

    The reason Benedict himself gave which cited lack of strength (I don’t remember health being explicitly cited), is more plausible at this juncture than that he was blackmailed.

  • Circumstantial evidence points to a conspiracy to replace Benedict with Francis. In my opinion all of this is a coalescence of evil pointing towards the Second Coming. The most probative piece of evidence is the heretical and unsaintly way Pope Francis acts.

  • “The Regensberg boys choir sex abuse scandal?”

    Which may only have been the tip of an iceberg. He admitted to slapping boys in the choir for disciplinary purposes, and it has been charged that since he ran the choir for three decades he had to know what was going on. I have long thought that his Sergeant Schultz imitation, “I knew nothing, nothing!” is implausible. He and his younger brother have been close all his life. The idea of blackmail being involved was raised at the time of the resignation:

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/feb/21/pope-retired-amid-gay-bishop-blackmail-inquiry

    It made no sense to me at the time, but I could imagine a gay Cardinal fighting back by producing evidence privately to the Pope about his beloved brother and how it would be a shame if in moving against him and his friends it would be necessary to reveal his brother’s involvement.

  • But again, none of this made any real splash in the media when it came out. Hardly blackmail that would cause him to abdicate the papacy.

  • The essence of blackmail is to keep it secret unless the target of blackmail does not do what the blackmailer wants.

    This is speculation of course, but the reason given by Pope Benedict for his abdication, especially of such an abrupt nature, simply does not make sense.

  • It’s 1380 again. We’ve got a pope that no one likes, and people are looking for an excuse to believe he’s not really the pope. This doesn’t end well.

  • @Pinky

    I ask myself; What’s changed?

    Why this merciful gesture now?
    Merciful in the eyes of the divorced only if the condemnation falls on whom if indeed Christ didn’t tell PF to open a path? Then the taking of Holy Communion unworthily is falling on whom…The partakers of Holy Communion? If God is the same yesterday today and forever, then Jesus did not alter the doctrine, none of the Holy Trinity.

    So why now?

    Leaving it up to folks own conscience is new. Formed or lack of formation, there seems to be a gargantuan risk. Not only for the recipient, but for priests who use Chpt.8 to pastor the fringe.

    My guess is that it will fall on the current Pope who opened this can of worms.

    How will it end?

  • The papal schism did more to “cause” the reformation than anything that Luther did. The roots of that lay in a famous Coup, where Boniface VIII forced his predecessor to resign. Francis reminds me far more of Boniface VIII than of St. Francis.

  • Philip Nachazel – We can question a statement or practice; we can even question the theology behind it. To question whether the Pope really is the Pope is a dark path, both intellectually and spiritually. It’s not like this has never happened before. It happens a lot, and it always leads to division. Functionally it’s indistinguishable from Protestantism.

  • If he was pressured or blackmailed in some way, I think the persons he was trying to protect is us. He might have known stuff about conclaves, Paul VI. John Paul the First’s death, and had come to a clearer understanding of what happened with the many wolves in sheeps clothing who were the men behind the curtain after Vat II. He may have come to realize he had been naive. He knew all that would cause such a loss of faith among the Catholic people of the world that he just didn’t want the lid to blow off… for our sakes. and Daneels etal would have been happy to have the lid go sky high. I think B16 wanted to protect us from knowing all the unholy stuff.

  • I agree with Pinky in this instance. Speculating on whether the Pope is really the Pope or if the Emeritus Pope is really the Pope or whether we’re without a Supreme Pontiff is going to make people crazy.

  • Pinky.
    Thanks.
    I wasn’t going down that path.
    Speculation on his motives is second to the claim of anti-pope Francis.
    No claims..just speculation and reading tea leaves.

    Until Pope Emeritus speaks of hostile threats and concrete crimes we just guess at the retirement move.

    Intervention from above save us from evil.

  • Francis reminds me far more of Boniface VIII than of St. Francis.

    IIRc, Boniface was a canon lawyer and curial official, which does not describe Francis.

    He might have known stuff about conclaves, Paul VI. John Paul the First’s death, a

    Wagers what he knew of John Paul I’s death was that a 65 year old cigarette smoker had a heart attack.

  • Art Deco.

    Holy Smokes.
    Those were the days of “doctor approved,” smoking…”more Doctors smoke Camel’s than any other cigarette.”

    Truth in advertising is a funny game.
    Seems the same game is going on now, in our Church leadership and it’s claims of mercy.

    Same game…. Different ad agencies.

  • Holy Smokes.
    Those were the days of “doctor approved,” smoking…”more Doctors smoke Camel’s than any other cigarette.”

    No clue about Italy. Any such advertisements in the U.S. would have disappeared ca. 1966 if not earlier.

    The last physician I can recall knowing whom was known to smoke cigarettes died around about 1976.

  • It’s the old story being played out again.

    The authority is used as creditable testimony. Regardless of the claim the facts are blurred in order to achieve goal. What is the goal of the Vatican?
    Save souls from hell? Increase revenues? The pitch man is the authority for many who are believing that his words are gold. Doctors in the 40’s thru the 60’s had a god like mystique. I recall the idea of getting a second opinion as being something no one would do in those years. The trust in your family Doctor was almost sacred.

    If the Church authority is promoting green think or communion for those living in certain union’s, then one wonders what is being sold, why and to what harm it might cause in the future.
    Similar to cigarette smoking a few decades back.

  • If the Church authority is promoting green think or communion for those living in certain union’s, then one wonders what is being sold, why and to what harm it might cause in the future.
    Similar to cigarette smoking a few decades back.

    At the time of the Cippolone case, a dear friend of ours (born in 1908, died in 2001, a cigarette smoker all her adult life) told me that in popular culture it had never been considered a healthy habit: “we called ’em ‘coffin nails’. Her personal memories would have covered almost the entire period of time that cigarettes were a commonly used consumer product.

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Resignation Rumors

Saturday, February 23, AD 2013

Well this was inevitable.  When something that hasn’t happened for almost six centuries happens, there are going to be rumors about why it is happening:

VATICAN CITY – With just days to go before Pope Benedict XVI’s resignation, the Vatican is battling rumours that his decision was triggered by an explosive report on intrigue in its hallowed corridors of power.

The secret report compiled by a committee of three cardinals for the pope’s eyes only was the result of a broad inquiry into leaks of secret Vatican papers last year — a scandal known as “Vatileaks”.

The cardinals questioned dozens of Vatican officials and presented the pope with their final report in December 2012, just before Benedict pardoned his former butler Paolo Gabriele who had been jailed for leaking the papal memos.

The Panorama news weekly and the Repubblica daily said on Thursday that the cardinals’ report contained allegations of corruption and of blackmail attempts against gay Vatican clergymen, as well as favouritism based on gay relationships.

The Vatican has declined to comment on these two reports, with spokesman Federico Lombardi saying they were “conjectures, fictions and opinions.”

In an interview with El Pais, one of the investigating cardinals, Julian Herranz, said the scandal was “a bubble” that had been “inflated”.

“There will be black sheep, I am not saying there are not, like in all families,” he said, adding that the investigators had “spoken to people, seen what works and what does not, lights and shadows”.

Speaking to Italy’s Radio 24, Herranz said the idea that “Vatileaks” might have influenced the pope’s decision was one “hypothesis” among many others.

“These are decisions that are taken personally in the deep of one’s conscience and they must be profoundly respected,” the 82-year-old said.

At his final public mass last week, Benedict himself condemned “religious hypocrisy” and urged an end to “individualism and rivalry”.

“The face of the Church… is at times disfigured. I am thinking in particular of the sins against the unity of the Church,” he said, without elaborating.

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24 Responses to Resignation Rumors

  • I sat through the child protection seminar three years ago and left confused by two things: how can the Archdiocese straight faced say that there is no homosexual connection to the abuse and how can it be that the highest ranking members of our clergy were not utterly enraged by the stories they heard.

    I have read snipets of the referenced allegations for several years due to translations of Italian news outlets – outlets consumed with interest in scandal, particularly secular and Vatican political scandal. Allegations of homosexual impropriety at the Vatican are legion.

    The elephant in the room is that homosexuality appears to be more prevalent than we want to acknowledge and enough of our clergy are acting on their impulses to bring scandal to the Church on an ongoing basis. Benedict forcefully affirmed the Church’s position early in his Papacy. We will likely never know if he would have gone farther or if the push-back from the hierachy was too much for him to have purged their ranks of the actively homosexual priests.

  • “how can the Archdiocese straight faced say that there is no homosexual connection to the abuse”

    The efforts to make such an argument, in defiance of all the facts of the abuse, were both striking and ridiculous.

  • I sat through the child protection seminar three years ago and left confused by two things: how can the Archdiocese straight faced say that there is no homosexual connection to the abuse and how can it be that the highest ranking members of our clergy were not utterly enraged by the stories they heard.

    They say it because they are listening to members of the helping professions, in part out of lack of self-confidence and in part because their lawyers tell them to do so. As for the helping professions, denying the pathologies and personal responsibility of the homosexual population is part of their professional ideology. It is a postulate.

  • As I understood the argument, attraction to children is a distinct class of sexuality, distinguishable from homosexual and heterosexual sex. Fair enough… But, within that class, surely there are sub-classes of those attracted exclusively to young boys, exclusively to young girls, and indiscriminately deviant?

    The other problem I had was that the presentation used only the most eggregious abuse as examples, the ones that left me, as a parent, wondering “and the parents let this go on for how long?” The Grand Jury Report in Philadelphia suggests that a large percentage of the coerced sex was from male clergy to post-pubescant boys, 16 to 19 years old or so.

    Surely the man who finds young men or women attractive is in a different, albeit deviant too, place than one who is attracted to young children?

    It is surprising to me that the Church treats homosexuality within the churchas nearly taboo and that makes me wonder if these recurring stories are not true.

  • Marie Carre’s AA-1025 book about the communists infiltration of the Catholic Church; fodder or fact?

  • As I understood the argument, attraction to children is a distinct class of sexuality, distinguishable from homosexual and heterosexual sex

    There are biologists who specialize in taxonomy; some are ‘lumpers’ and some are ‘splitters’.

    There is a specialist in sexual behavior named Bailey (sociologist or psychologist at Northwestern, IIRC) who was raked over the coals by ‘activists’ about 10 years ago for publishing a monograph which argued that transexualism is a surface manifestation of one of two sorts of deviance: it can express intense homosexuality or an odd sort of sexual fetishism. This thesis got some people’s noses out of joint.

    A librarian of my acquaintance had this to say: “all schemes of classification are ultimately arbitrary. The point is, ‘can you learn them’?”. This may not be altogether true, but should the purveyors of psychotherapy and ‘counseling’ really be accorded such trust that one does not notice that their taxonomies are verrrrry conveeeenient.

  • The Grand Jury Report in Philadelphia suggests that a large percentage of the coerced sex was from male clergy to post-pubescant boys, 16 to 19 years old or so.

    The Grand Jury apparently fancies that the Catholic clergy have a median age of about 32 and are recruited exclusively from the ranks of military officers and athletic coaches.

  • The OT and NT both acknowledge that bestiality and male homosexuality exist in the human condition. The medical community sees a distinction between same-gender attraction (homosexuality, from homos, Greek, not homo-Latin so it is genderless). And attraction to infants and pre-pubescent males and same for females AND post-pubescent males and females. Media and bishops alike and at times Vatican offiicials bandied about the word “homosexuality” to apply to all without distinction. The US bishops have a Charter that presumes that even one allegation made, proven or confessed decadaes ago demands the canonical death penalty for clergy. The sociological evidence and Court cases are slowly revealing the high incidence of abuse by males, and females, single and married against each gender of all ages. The media-legal mud and revelations from Church and State officials are slowly showing that University professors, medical personnel and teachers as well as all varieties of Protestant and Jewish clergy and also guilty of power-abuse of all age groups from grade school through University and adults in the various medical and other professional care, are a large part of the actual story. Most abuse is incest and abuse within the family. Is it not time then to lay off old and false unproven allegations and past deeds of hierarchy and clergy and deal with the whole culture and Church and make a sharp distinction between very sick men and women and boundary violations by clergy who were coming to emotional maturity after a sheltered all male formation and education- hot-house versus the wind and rain of the outside world.

  • Besides AA-1025 has anyone read Bella Dodd’s interviews and the number of young men of communist persuasion who were sent to the seminaries to subvert the faith? Her book School of Darkness is still available. All this was planned out by the Grand Masonic Lodge in Rome, read the Alta Vendita–which one of our past popes had printed had his own expense so lay people would be warned.

  • It would be comforting to be a conspiracy theorist and believe that the problems within the Church were caused by Masons and Communists. Alas, this is so much crank wackery, and our problems are basically a result of too many of both the clergy and the laity turning their backs on traditional Catholicism in favor of Catholicism Lite, a Catholicism stripped of its beauty and empty at its core.

  • I’m sorry LoneThinker, I am not following you. Could you state the same thing more simply?

  • “….comforting to be a conspiracy theorists…”

    There’s nothing comforting about the warfare going on, nor the means by which the enemy will use to win souls. On the two hundredth anniversary of the Masons a young seminarian studying in Rome was witness to the celebrations of professed destroyers of Catholic Church. St. Maximilian Kolbe noticed the hatred of the Masons as they waved their banners of Lucifer crushing the head of St. Michael.
    This is a warfare of the possession of souls by Christ through grace or by the prince of this world through sin.
    To easily dispute the notion of conspiracy and name it “crank wackery” is akin to saying that spies never existed in WWII. You are correct in the obvious, that Catholic Lite is the choice of many, however to rule out subversion of our Holy Church by any means possible is unbecoming of your great intellect.

  • Nope Philip it is simple rubbish today. The problems that currently beset the Church are not caused by evil conspiracies of, cue the foreboding music, Masons, Communists, Liberals et al. Would that it would be so easy to set all aright by merely defeating a small, albeit influential, cabal! At bottom our problems are caused by too many people within the Church behaving as if they did not believe what the Church teaches is actually true. That is what is at the core of all of our problems: the abuse crisis, the fact that the Mass is celebrated today throughout this country with all the awe, splendor and majesty of a tupperware party, the fact that Catholics routinely vote for pro-aborts, etc. The crisis of the Church is not external but internal, and it is a simple failure of belief.

  • Unfortunately your probably correct.
    We have met the enemy, and it is us.
    Peace Donald.

  • Donald: “the fact that the Mass is celebrated today throughout this country with all the awe, splendor and majesty of a tupperware party,”
    You have said it.

  • As I understood the argument, attraction to children is a distinct class of sexuality, distinguishable from homosexual and heterosexual sex.

    Pedophilia is often used to include ephebophilia– under-aged, but have gone through at least part of the sexual change. (depending on what source you’re looking at, too)

    Probably a lot more common than little-kid pedophilia, and much more likely to get a “pass” or be actively defended.

    From memory, most of the sex abuse in the US was homosexual and aimed at post-pubescent boys.

    Very vulnerable targets, especially for abuse by experienced predators. (That’s why “under aged” isn’t tied to “has started puberty.”)

  • “From memory, most of the sex abuse in the US was homosexual and aimed at post-pubescent boys.”

    Correct. That it is often overlooked is no accident as the Marxists used to say.

  • All of which begs the question: Why doesn’t the Church acknowledge the homosexual connection to the abuse? The first step in healing a patient should be diagnosis.

  • I think Rembert Weakland about sums it up. Former Archbishop of Milwaukee he was heterodox and orthodox Catholics often wondered how he had risen so far in the heirarchy. It came out after he had resigned that he used 450,000 of Church money to pay off his male lover who revealed the story to the press anyway years later.

    http://www.seattlecatholic.com/article_20020607_Archbishop_Weaklands_Legacy.html

    Needless to say Weakland has never paid back a dime of the hush money. This thief sits today on the board of directors of the Wisconsin Catholic Conference. He is living evidence of the truth that there is clearly a “lavender Mafia” at work within the Church that promotes its members and protects them. The next Pope will have his work cut out for him if he decides to attack this evil head on.

  • Even afterward, Margaret Steinfels said she thought Weakland a ‘good bishop.’

    I suspect

    1. The problems with sexual corruption in the Church are only weakly related to the degree of heterodoxy in a given diocese. One problem with making that assessment is that when you look at a given accused priest, you often find that the bishop in office while he was in formation, the bishop who ordained him, the bishop in charge when the supposed offense took place, and the bishop who processed the complaint against him were four different individuals. That aside, some dioceses have had an alternating series of conservative and liberal bishops. An accused priest in Rochester may have been ordained by Bishop Kearney, supposed to have molested a youth during Bishop Hogan’s tenure, and faced an accusation under Bishop Clark.

    2. The Holy See lacks the manpower to police the Church in aught but a haphazard and episodic way. The Holy See needs to ensure that there are appropriate procedures incorporated into canon law and to be meticulous in its selection of bishops. There will be occasions where a general visitation of a country’s seminaries is in order. However, the leg work has to be done by local ordinaries, or it is not done.

    3. And, of course, what the diocesan bishop can do is often prophylactic. One wretched bit of business has been the accusation against sitting bishops that they are ‘covering-up’ and ‘not protecting kids’ when the complaints they were receiving were filed 15 years after the fact; a bishop cannot protect a 29 year old man against something which happened when he was 14 (when the bishop in question was an administrator at some suburban parish the next diocese over).

  • For what’s it worth; Goodbye good men, by Michael S. Rose asks the questions “what happened?”
    He interviewed over 150 people, priests and laymen in the Catholic Church.
    To sum it up, Liberal attack from the inside.
    Under attack is status quo for Our Holy Church.

  • Rose’s book was subject to some persuasive criticism at the time of its publication on the part of Fr. Robert Johansen and Brian St. Paul, among others. Rose and Dale Vree were fairly neuralgic about it. (The burden of the complaint was that while the problem described was real, some of the specifics were bum raps and much of the narrative was dated, referring to situations no longer current). I think we error if we see it as enemies burrowing away (although that happens) and avoid thinking about problems in the evolution of institutional culture. Why, during the period running from about 1925 to 1985, were an escalating contingent of men with latent (and subsequently uncontrolled) sexual dysfunctions ordained; why did the bulk of the ongoing problem abruptly evaporate around about 1990; what lies behind the irresponsible behavior of a selection of bishops (keeping in mind that addressing the problem well was impossible even for the most capable and conscientious bishops), among them McCormack, Sheehan, Matthiessen, Grahmann, Tshoeppe, Law, &c. ? I am not sure a satisfying and credible answer has been tendered; certainly some of the self-appointed gurus (Andrew Greeley, Thomas Doyle, Richard Sipe, Leon Podles) were not offering any.

  • Art Deco-
    Why?
    Good questions.
    Indifference?!
    Is it possible that many just looked the other way?
    Is it from years of orchestrated planning…yes Donald add the foreboding music here…, however it does make one wonder if the checks and balances we’re washed over on purpose, or deliberate.
    We are left with many questions.

  • …not or. ( and deliberate! )
    Please excuse my haste.

Fools to Judge his Papacy

Monday, February 11, AD 2013

Pope Benedict

I have always shuddered when a Pope dies because I am filled with dread of what comes next:   Endless reams of bad commentary by people who pretend to know something about the Vatican but who usually succeed only in revealing their bone ignorance of the subject.  The resignation of Pope Benedict I expect to inspire more of the same.

First up is John Moody, Executive Vice President, Fox News, and a former Vatican correspondent, who takes Pope Benedict to task for what he perceives to be a failed papacy.  Pope Benedict’s main crime appears to be that he was not Pope John Paul II:

By contrast, Benedict’s meek initial outings were public relations meltdowns.  His smile, though genuine, looked somehow sinister, as if he were about to bite  his audience. Determined to restore the Church’s luster in Europe, where it is  often treated like a dotty old aunt, Benedict gave a lecture in Regensburg, Germany, in 2006  that appeared to denigrate Islam. The non-Catholic world howled; the Vatican  cringed and apologized.

On his first visit to the U.S. as pope, Benedict offered contrite apologies  for the Church’s ham-handed treatment of the U.S. church’s sex scandal involving  its priests. Even the pope’s humble mien did not satisfy some, who pronounced  him cold and unfeeling toward the plight of victims of clergy abuse. He joined  the Twitterati, but his first attempt was a sterile: “I am pleased to get in  touch with you through Twitter. I bless all of you from my heart.” At least he  stayed under 140 characters.

In nearly eight years, Benedict issued three encyclicals – direct messages to  the faithful that often reveal a pope’s enthusiasms and interests. Benedict’s  first – entitled “God is Love” — is a caressing, simply worded, logic-based  reassurance that our Lord loves us. Yet even his writing about love suffers in  comparison with John Paul’s towering, intellectual yet intimate canon of  work.

None of which lessens Benedict’s place in the line of Vicars of Christ. His  decision to resign was a brave one, based on personal humility, in keeping with  his message to the faithful that the things of Earth are transient, but the  promise of heaven lasting and infinite.  For that he should be  remembered.

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20 Responses to Fools to Judge his Papacy

  • Of course he’s gotten the typical clueless disparagement from a lot of media folks, but I’ve actually been surprised by how many pretty orthodox Catholics have been relatively lukewarm, if not downright disappointed, with Benedict’s papacy.

    I had no complaints with his reign., but I guess I’ll at least hear out people who did.

  • Yet even his writing about love suffers in comparison with John Paul’s towering, intellectual yet intimate canon of work.

    For what it’s worth, I’ve long felt that Pope Benedict was a much more concise and clear writer than Pope John Paul II. Both were/are tremendous intellects, but Pope Benedict was always able to take complex theological ideas and present them in a way that was somewhat more comprehensible.

  • “but I’ve actually been surprised by how many pretty orthodox Catholics have been relatively lukewarm, if not downright disappointed, with Benedict’s papacy.”

    Too many Catholics, and I often include myself in that group, expect a Pope to come in and fix all the problems within the Church yesterday. The Church has never operated that way. Even in fairly revolutionary times the Church has almost always adopted a go slow incremental approach. Vatican II is a modern exception to that rule, and living in the aftermath of that Council I can appreciate the usual wisdom of the go slow incremental approach. We also live in a time which treasures that mysterious quality called charisma. John Paul II, at least until his final dying years, had that quality more in abundance than any other Pope I can think of, certainly of the modern era. A hard act to follow in that regard.

  • The media are already making fools of themselves. They pass off opinion instead of reporting, and distort the facts.

    Pope Benedict took the job at 79 years old. He never wanted it. He wanted to go home to Germany. He is a nearly 88 year old man and I can think of no 88 year old who wants to work every day all day.

    The Anglican Ordinariate is a massive positive achievement. it is a shame that the Society of St. Pius X would not take the Pope’s offer, but so many of them are too full of themselves to see the world as it is.

    God Bless the Pope. He has earned a retirement.

    God bloess Pope Benedict XVI.

  • Like Sts. Peter and Paul, Pope John Paul II and Benedict XVI are inseparable

  • For what it is worth, I think Pope Benedict XVI was one of the best ever. Comparing him to Pope John Paul II is unfair. Each one has his own unique strengths and weaknesses, and the Holy Spirit gave us each one at the right time for God’s often inscrutable purposes. I have heard it described that Pope Paul VI was more prophetic, Pope John Paul II more priestly and Pope Benedict XVI more kingly. That’s certainly an interesting allusion to the oft heard phrase, “Prophet, Priest and King.” I don’t pretend to be so informed that I can critique that assertion, but in modern times, while they all had their faults, we really have had a rash of good Popes since at least Leo XIII in the 19th century. God has been very good to us and we should be grateful.

  • I read the Weigel book “God’s Choice…” a few years back and (rightly or wrongly) became convinced that Ratzinger was really God’s choice. And… that is all we can ask.
    I have prayed for him. I will pray for his successor.

  • I had a friend who was a German WW2 vet. (Suffered on the Russian front, but survived.) German boys were drafted into the army at age 16, then were provisional soldiers performing non-combat duty until age 18 when they received full rank and privilege of a soldier.

    I read an interview with a similar German vet about the time they were still under 18, in training. I try to reproduce it here from my memory…

    Our squad sargeant asked us all what job we hoped to hold someday, and I specifically recall my answer: “Pilot”. In fact, I think most of the boys wanted to be pilots….or tanker, or engineer, or some other manly profession. But when the sargeant came to our radio operator, he clearly and surely said “I hope to become a parish priest” We all laughed at him. Sarge said “Private Ratzinger, I doubt you’ll get very far in life as a parish priest.”

    I’d say he made it pretty far.

  • As a country we are rapidly following the rest of the world into abject secularism. Moral values are forgotten. “Gay marriage”as “equality” will open the door to polygamy and Lord knows what else. We need leadership and moral direction, or else soceity is in big trouble.

    Understand he’s a long shot, but I think Timothy Cardinal Dolan is the man. Charismatic, pastoral and one the world would admire and listen to.

  • I thought his first encyclical was brilliant and perfectly addressed the issues we are facing as a church today. I haven’t been able to make the time to read his second encyclical, but I expect it to be just as awesome. I recall giving “Cardinal Ratzinger Fan Club” coffee mugs to friends for Christmas presents the Christmas before he became Pope.

    I had to roll my eyes when I read that Fox editorial this morning. I expected it, though. The news media can’t be expected to praise him in today’s world, which tries to undermine everything the Church teaches. Fox has a reputation for being conservative, but they have so much immorality in their “entertainment” headlines and pictures that I can’t expect that they’ll understand where social conservatives are really coming from.

  • Benedict gave a lecture in Regensburg, Germany, in 2006 that appeared to denigrate Islam. The non-Catholic world howled; the Vatican cringed and apologized.

    True only if the non-Catholic world is restricted to Islam, the rest were not bothered at all. Some dhimmi in the Vatican may have gone into preemptive damage control, but the Pope himself did not. In fact his clarification may have infuriated the intellectuals among the Muslims even more, as the main philosophical point of the Regensberg address is that the attributes of God, require even Him not to act arbitrarily for otherwise He is merely a tyrant. The Holy Father is one those who regard Greek philosophy as a kind of fifth Gospel, this established the high intellectual level of his ratiocinations.

    Possibly for the sake of Christians living (and now fleeing for their lives) in Syria and the larger Middle East, JP11 kissed the Koran. Some Muslims tried the same trick when Pope Benedict was in Turkey later in 2006, but he deftly passed on the koran to his aides. From then it was clear that the (brief) period of kowtowing to Islam and succumbing to the blackmail of its minions was over.

  • @Alphatron

    His third encyclical, “Caritas in veritate,” is also a good one. He had some strong words to say to free-market purists.

  • “His third encyclical, “Caritas in veritate,” is also a good one. He had some strong words to say to free-market purists.”

    Actually, I didn’t take that away from it. It seems he spoke what has pretty much been said about the free market in previous encyclicals.

    What I think differed was his radical rooting of Charity in Truth. Gone should be that raw emotionalism that calls itself Charity per Benedict. Important words as we continue to order our world with bankrupt (literally as well as figuratively) ideas from the past.

  • I have a calm faith that the Holy Spirit will bring forward the man whom He knows is the right man for these evil times. I also can’t help but pray that it’s Cardinal Burke.

    And may God forgive me but I also pray it isn’t Cardinal Dolan. The times we live in call for a lion, another Pius X, not an “oh-so-friendly, easy-to-talk-to, pastoral” man such as Dolan.

  • St. Celestine V pray for us.

  • Moody forget to mention that Gisele Bundchen AND Lady Gaga didn’t like some of the stuff that Pope Benedict XVI said either. Just more proof of his failure as a pope, I guess.

  • even his writing about love suffers in comparison with John Paul’s

    Really? JP II was a great intellect and good writer, but BXVI is just as strong intellectually and a better writer. And that he was not JP II is a feature, not a bug. Each has his strengths, we did not need a JP III.

    Let us hope the Holy Spirit brings forth the pope we need, and not the one we deserve.

  • “Let us hope the Holy Spirit brings forth the pope we need, and not the one we deserve.”

    Maybe what we need is what we deserve.

    🙁

  • I think we should go back to telling everybody that the Pope can do whatever the hell he wants and if you don’t like it you can take it down the road. Then smack ’em with a ruler.

  • Pray that the next Pope be not one following Political & Governmental Agendas but a Spiritual one following Jesus Christ.