April 25, 1976: Saving the Flag

Monday, April 25, AD 2016

I am not much of a baseball fan, but I have always remembered Cubs centerfielder Rick Monday saving the flag from two loons who sought to burn it on the field during a game on April 25, 1976 between the Cubs and the Los Angeles Dodgers at Dodger Field.   When Monday came to bat the next time in the game he received a standing ovation from the crowd.   The Dodgers went on to win the game 5-4 in ten innings, but Rick Monday, nonetheless, went home a winner.

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4 Responses to April 25, 1976: Saving the Flag

  • “If that’s all your known for its not a bad thing.”
    -Rick Monday.

    I’m a softy. This was a pleasurable tear that visited my cheek this morning. GREAT job Don. Thanks for the lift.

    While we were praying in front of PP Saturday a very small group of “Students for Planned Parenthood,” came out with their pink signs and went to the ends of our line of protesters.
    Bookends if you will. I was moved to reach beyond them, and I did, then the Holy Spirit spoke through me to them. We talked about the Holocaust. The WWII holocaust and our on going holocaust, and the similarities. Never did the pitch of our voices raise into fury, but they did not light the flag Saturday either. They did not have a win. They couldn’t even pick up their heads as we spoke about the killings of children going on and how they themselves had survived the Holocaust of abortion.

    This morning clip reminded me that, if all I’m known for is trying my best to save a child from death…than that’s not a bad thing to be known for. God bless Rick Monday.

  • Comment of the week Philip! Take ‘er away Sam!

  • Rick Monday should be in Cooperstown.

Abbott and Costello, Charles Laughton and the Gettysburg Address

Monday, November 23, AD 2015

 

Last Thursday, the same day of the week that Lincoln originally gave the speech, marked the 152nd anniversary of the Gettysburg Address.  On April 6, 1952, comedy titans Abbott and Costello were hosting the Colgate Comedy Hour.  They had as their guest star Charles Laughton, one of the greatest English actors of the first half of the last century.  Amazingly enough the comedy duo and Laughton were co-starring at the time in the forgettable Abbott and Costello Meet Captain Kidd.

This was back in the days of live television, and the sheer spontaneity made this brief period of television magic.  As was the case when Laughton, who had given a stunning rendition of the Gettysburg Address in the movie Ruggles of Red Gap (1935), recites the Address before a visibly moved Abbott and Costello.  Both Abbott and Costello were patriots.  Too old, Abbott was 44 at the time of Pearl Harbor, and sick, heart problems and epilepsy afflicted Costello, for military service in World War II, they threw themselves into war bond drives and sold more bonds than any other entertainers.  In one heartbreaking incident they performed at a bond drive immediately after the death of Costello’s infant son, the shattered Costello giving the huge audience no hint of the tragedy that had just befallen him and his wife.   They had done their bit to ensure “that government of the people, by the people and for the people would not perish from the Earth” and for them the Address was no mere artifact from long ago but a magnificent expression of what this country means. 

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3 Responses to Abbott and Costello, Charles Laughton and the Gettysburg Address

  • Thanks for that video, Mac! I want to stand up and cheer.

  • The June 19, 2015 version:

    (Dr. Guy McClung addressed the San Antonio City Council during the Citizens to Be Heard session on June 17th, 2015.)

    Council Members and (newly elected) Mayor Taylor, thank you for the courtesies you have shown me when I have spoken to you in the past and thank you for this opportunity to speak to you this evening. Mayor Taylor, the pro-life voters of San Antonio have elected you out of hope. This is why the pastors and priests of San Antonio, the Texas Leadership Coalition, the San Antonio Family Association and others endorsed (and supported) you, in hope that you will remain the voice of families in San Antonio and that you will become a strong effective voice for all the children of San Antonio, including San Antonio’s unborn children.

    It is the pro-life vote that handed you this victory. Your opponent’s hypocrisy in calling herself a Roman Catholic and then by her official actions and words subverting the teaching of her own Church were clear to the pro-life voters. Her key support of Wendy Davis did not go unnoticed; nor did the clear applicability to her of Jesus’ own words “hypocrite.”

    The 1857 Supreme Court Dred Scott decision held that Dred Scott, his wife, and their unborn child were not human beings, but were property to be bought and sold. Ironically Chief Justice Roger Taney, a Democrat, born on a tobacco slave plantation, former slave owner, who handed down the Dred Scott decision, was also a Roman Catholic. Abraham Lincoln and the US Congress not only defied Taney and the Supreme Court, they refused to obey the decision. And then we had a Civil War over this. In the summer of 1863 in the costliest of battles in terms of loss of life, over 50,000 soldiers from both sides died at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. If we continue in San Antonio, the number of dead children here will exceed the number of dead at Gettysburg. In the Fall of 1863 President Lincoln went to dedicate a cemetery to the dead soldiers. The words he spoke there have become known as the “Gettysburg Address.” Here is The San Antonio Address:
    The San Antonio Address

    (In Honor of Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address)

    Almost a dozen score years ago our forefathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men, women, and children are created equal, and founded on the principle that they are all endowed by their Creator with the inalienable right to life.

    Now we are engaged in a great civil conflict, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met at great battlefields of that conflict, in San Antonio, the city with the new killing chambers of Planned Parenthood, with the final solutions of Whole Women’s Health Services, and the death dealers of Alamo Women’s Reproductive Center. We have come to dedicate a portion of this city as the final resting place of thousands of innocent children; to dedicate their unmarked graves, the dumpsters, the toilets, the biological waste incinerators, and the garbage cans that receive their remains. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

    But, in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate , we cannot hallow the ground here in San Antonio where they have died and where more will die. The dead children, who struggle, suffer, cry out with silent screams, and die here have consecrated it and will consecrate it, far above our poor power to add or detract.

    The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget that they have been and will continue to be killed here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which the children who die here have thus far so nobly advanced, the work they have begun in their small way, dying with their tiny voices unheard. But we will hear them.

    It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us — that from these honored dead children we take increased devotion to that cause for which they give the last full measure of devotion, that we here insure that no more children’s lives are taken in this city of St. Anthony, St. Anthony who was gifted to hold the infant Jesus in his arms . That we here highly resolve that these dead children, and all the dead children of America shall not die in vain in this American Holocaust– that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom — and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, including all the people, even the smallest people now warm and happy within their mothers’ wombs, that this nation, these people, and these children shall not perish from the earth.

  • Two HUGE sentiments of thanks go out two Guy and Donald.
    The clip stirred my heart. Excellent delivery.
    The San Antonio Address as well is a poignant reminder of the continuation of a civil war.
    Guy. You are blessed and have blessed us with your Faith.
    Thanks and a many Happy Thanksgiving to your loved ones. For the unborn, a prayer at your gatherings. For the living, a prayer of gratitude.

Flag, Country and Love

Saturday, June 13, AD 2015

 

Something for the weekend.  Columbia the Gem of the Ocean seems appropriate for a Flag Day weekend.  Written in 1843, by Thomas a Becket, yeah, the name is correct, Columbia, the Gem of the Ocean was probably the most popular patriotic ballad of the Nineteenth Century:

O Columbia! the gem of the ocean,
The home of the brave and the free,
The shrine of each patriot’s devotion,
A world offers homage to thee;
Thy mandates make heroes assemble,
When Liberty’s form stands in view;
Thy banners make tyranny tremble,
When borne by the red, white, and blue,
When borne by the red, white, and blue,
When borne by the red, white, and blue,
Thy banners make tyranny tremble,
When borne by the red, white and blue.


When war wing’d its wide desolation,
And threaten’d the land to deform,
The ark then of freedom’s foundation,
Columbia rode safe thro’ the storm;
With her garlands of vict’ry around her,
When so proudly she bore her brave crew;
With her flag proudly floating before her,
The boast of the red, white and blue,
The boast of the red, white and blue,
The boast of the red, white, and blue,
With her flag proudly floating before her,
The boast of the red, white and blue.
 
 
 

The star spangled banner bring hither,
O’er Columbia’s true sons let it wave;
May the wreaths they have won never wither,
Nor its stars cease to shine on the brave.
May thy service united ne’er sever,
But hold to the colors so true;
The army and navy forever,
Three cheers for the red, white, and blue!
Three cheers for the red, white, and blue!
The army and navy forever,
Three cheers for the red, white, and blue

Here is a rendition by Bing Crosby of Edward Everett Hale’ s story The Man Without a Country.  Published in the midst of the Civil War in December 1863, I have always regarded it as a profound meditation on Patriotism, Home and the meaning of America.  Hale, a grandnephew of Nathan Hale, hoped to bolster support for the Union with this plea for love of country and patriotism.  Schoolchildren used to be taught it, and when I first read it as a young boy it brought tears to my eyes.

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2 Responses to Flag, Country and Love

  • In first grade in 1956, the nuns taught us that grand, old song.
    .

    Tomorrow is Flag Day.
    .

    Old Glory is the symbol of America. It represents many things: Mom, apple pie, Babe Ruth, Freedom, and Sacrifice. Many young American men lost their lives in in far away lands where the flag and their buddies were all they had.
    .

    I am afflicted with the “warm and fuzzy” whenever I see her.

    Any man or woman that doesn’t love the flag is not worthy of respect.

  • the sheet music in your excellent post gave credit for the song to a Mr Shaw. – so i looked a little further ….. and found this………………….”Columbia, the Gem of the Ocean” received an American copyright in 1843 and is credited to the name of David T. Shaw. Yet to understand the true origins of Shaw’s song one must follow two threads. One thread leads to Thomas a’Beckett who claimed to have rewritten Shaw’s lyrics before the song was copyrighted. The other thread leads to Stephen Joseph Meany who wrote the poem “Britannia, the Pride of the Ocean,” from which, in turn, a’Beckett may have taken his lyrics.

Making Mock of Uniforms

Sunday, November 9, AD 2014

 Honor

 

 

A man who has nothing which he is willing to fight for, nothing which he cares more about than he does about his personal safety, is a miserable creature who has no chance of being free, unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself. As long as justice and injustice have not terminated their ever-renewing fight for ascendancy in the affairs of mankind, human beings must be willing, when need is, to do battle for the one against the other.

John Stuart Mill

 

 

Just in time for Veterans Day!  David Masciotra at Salon has a piece that perfectly encapsulates the contempt and hate many on the left have for those who serve in our military.  The opening paragraph is a treasure trove of the pre-occupations of leftists in this country:

 

 

Put a man in uniform, preferably a white man, give him a gun, and Americans will worship him. It is a particularly childish trait, of a childlike culture, that insists on anointing all active military members and police officers as “heroes.” The rhetorical sloppiness and intellectual shallowness of affixing such a reverent label to everyone in the military or law enforcement betrays a frightening cultural streak of nationalism, chauvinism, authoritarianism and totalitarianism, but it also makes honest and serious conversations necessary for the maintenance and enhancement of a fragile democracy nearly impossible.

 

1.  Anti-white racism?  Check.

2.  Contempt for American culture?  Check.

3.  Hatred of patriotism?  Check.

4.  Paranoia about authoritarianism and/or totalitarianism for those who do not share the political views of the left?  Check.

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26 Responses to Making Mock of Uniforms

  • http://davidmasciotra.com/biography/

    He’s an admirer of Jesse Jackson, Cornell West, and Noam Chomsky, in other words he fancies the ersatz and the sinister. He’s employed as a columnist by the Indianapolis Star. The college he attended has hired this 30 year old man with no scholarly chops to teach. He seems a fine example of the articulateness that Th. Sowell’s has remarked the Anointed confuse with intelligence.

  • Ehhhh I just read his article….and it seems WAY more complicated than that. He is not saying “all soldiers/police suck”. He is not even saying patriotism is bad per se. Its just more “being a patriot and being willing to fight and die for freedom does not mean we never question US policy nor assume that every single US solider or cop is a saint”. Its about nuance, is what he is saying.

    I do take some issue with what he said about Iraq and Afghanistan. Even if we take the position that the wars had nothing to do with our freedom (which I don’t buy) fighting for Afghani and Iraqi freedom was and is worthwhile for its own sake. But the specific problems and abuses he mentioned were correct.

  • Also, I think anti-white racism is a stretch. To me, it reads more like:

    Years of subtle messages from movies, tv shows, politicians, media, and the stories we tell ourselves, combined perhaps with evolutionary instincts to favor those who look like us (white people), have conditioned us to experience biochemical reactions in our brains that make seeing a white man in uniform and with a gun less threatening at some level than someone who is not white.

  • Nah, his comment is simply reflecting the casual anti-white racism in fashion currently on the left. Additionally there is no nuance in what he wrote. The stub under the title says it all: “It’s been 70 years since we fought a war about freedom. Forced troop worship and compulsory patriotism must end.” The last justified war he can see is WW2. He then accuses the nation of imposing forced troop worship and compulsory patriotism which is an “Alice through the looking glass” departure from the reality in this country, especially for most denizens of the left in this nation, always ready to spit on the troops and ever ready to engage in hatriotism for this country.

  • I’m a white man of liberal leanings on certain issues, and I certainty don’t feel racist towards myself :). All joking aside, white male liberals seem to do just fine in liberal circles, so they are hardly an excluded group. Somewhat related, I must ask…..do you deny the argument I describe earlier, about the prevalence of, for lack of a better term, subconscious racism?

    Also, in terms of subtly, he does say that there are heroes (Or at least good guys. I disagree with his characterizations of all soldiers being victims, but that’s a far cry from calling them all brutes). When it comes to war, he seems to belong to that school that says we should only fight when our freedom and safety is more obviously at risk than it has seemed in the post World War 2 conflicts. I do disagree with his assessment, but credit must be given where it is due.

  • I am also not sure what you mean by his statement about pressuring people not to question to military/US government policy being “an ‘Alice through the looking glass’ departure from the reality in this country”. Even if liberals have cultural space to question these things, frankly, it seems like many people immediately jump down their throats for doing so. I think hes referring to the tenancy to call the questioners weak, which does really exist.

  • “All joking aside, white male liberals seem to do just fine in liberal circles, so they are hardly an excluded group.”
    Of course not. Liberals are always good about excluding themselves from their fulminations against white people. That is why Ted Kennedy was able to be a champion of busing while making certain his kids were educated at elite private schools. When it comes to race and the left in this country, the hypocrisy is a given.

    “prevalence of, for lack of a better term, subconscious racism?”

    Racism, by definition, has to be a conscious act. Accusing others of unconscious anything is a good way of making an argument without the need of providing proof to sustain it.

    “When it comes to war, he seems to belong to that school that says we should only fight when our freedom and safety is more obviously at risk than it has seemed in the post World War 2 conflicts.”

    That cannot be the argument he is making or else he would have supported our efforts post 9-11, and the efforts of such entities as Strategic Air Command during the Cold War that ensured that a Soviet nuclear first strike never was possible.

  • “Even if liberals have cultural space to question these things, frankly, it seems like many people immediately jump down their throats for doing so.”

    That is called freedom of speech. As a pro-lifer I am accustomed to having pro-aborts chime in against my arguments. I understand that most contemporary liberals tend to be very intolerant of people who hold views that differ from theirs.

    Additionally, liberals, when it comes to their anti-military stance embraced by the majority of them, have academia and the entertainment industry on their side. Consider how many money losing anti-Iraq war pictures were made by Hollywood. The idea that there is a compulsory patriotism and worship of troops stance in this country could only be argued by someone disconnected from the actual history of this nation over the past five decades.

  • Without being fully aware of what they are doing, white people step to the other side of the street, clutch their bags, etc when confronted particularity with non-white youths. I could relate at least two stories that I know of regarding African American gentlemen dressed in suits who were treated less equally than white individuals standing next to them. Being scared of things non white youths do, even when white youths do the same things? Police officers automatically being suspicious? The welfare queen myth, when instances of fraud are actually very rare, (AND the whole system is so messed up it actually punishes people for saving money or making just a tiny bit above certain thresholds)? These things are real.

  • “Without being fully aware of what they are doing, white people step to the other side of the street, clutch their bags, etc when confronted particularity with non-white youths.”

    “There is nothing more painful to me at this stage in my life than to walk down the street and hear footsteps and start thinking about robbery. Then look around and see somebody white and feel relieved…. After all we have been through. Just to think we can’t walk down our own streets, how humiliating.”

    Jesse Jackson, November 29, 1993

  • And yet, adults and youths who try and “play the game”, experience this treatment as well. Whats more, there maybe a perception regarding youth, but 9 out of 10 times you can walk past and you would be fine. And I emphasize, a white kid in a hoddie won’t turn heads.

    We do make snap decisions without thinking about whether there is a real threat or we simply have been conditioned to perceive a threat. All we who consider ourselves “liberal” on this issue simply hold that we need to be aware of these actions and where they come from, and force ourselves to not follow (or at least question) our instincts.

  • “And yet, adults and youths who try and “play the game”, experience this treatment as well.”

    Hardly. Getting back to the military, who is going to feel threatened by a black 20 year old male who is walking down the street in Marine dress blues? Of course this is all a red herring and has nothing to do with the anti-military screed of the Salon writer. He threw in his anti-white throw away line because it is an all purpose no proof argument when leftists are decrying the broader American culture.

  • “Greet them ever with grateful hearts.”

    Was in the North Woods since Wednesday. Tramped out yesterday, Sunday.

    We sometimes meet other hunters, and less often “sneaker people” hikers, who we’ve seen exercise their divine powers to trash hunters tents and supplies b/c they regard it a mortal sin to hunt Bambi’s great-great-great-grandsons.

    We met two younger men who came out of their deer camp and of course we compared notes. When I suggested eating MRE’s rather than carrying heavier loads of real food, one man said he had had enougn MRE in the USMC. Then, he told me of his couisn (who should have been there on that hunt) was in KIA with the 101st and didn’t make it back to hunt deer ever again. That came up when I told him my son is in the 101.

    Simply stated, there is an insufficient supply of ammunition in comparison to the over-supply of liberals.

    watcher7689: Dulce Africanus inexpertis.

  • In Europe, both the Left and the Right have traditionally regarded universal conscription as the counterpart to universal suffrage. It was Léon Blum, after all, who declared that “no citizen should be denied the right, nor relieved of the responsibility, of defending the nation under arms” and always insisted on an army of “citizens in uniform.”
    It is worth recalling Rousseau’s warning, “As soon as public service ceases to be the chief business of the citizens, and they would rather serve with their money than with their persons, the State is not far from its fall. When it is necessary to march out to war, they pay troops and stay at home: when it is necessary to meet in council, they name deputies and stay at home. By reason of idleness and money, they end by having soldiers to enslave their country and representatives to sell it.”
    “Those who serve in our military have no greater say about our international policies than the rest of us.” In fact, they have rather less. The army, with its tradition of not getting involved in politics, is not known as « La grand muette » [The big mute] for nothing.

  • Before returning to the article at hand, I wish to throw out a couple of more points. First, regarding what you said about the Marine, you’d be surprised.
    Secondly, I guarantee a relatively quick search will show numerous examples of the scenarios I described.

    But on to the article. We both agree that saying there were no justified conflicts between WW2 and now is a gross exaggeration. But hatred of our country and armed forces is a lot different then naivete. And, I must reiterate, he did say individuals Were heroes. Acknowledging both is just common sense. And many liberals would disagree with his no just war since WW2 theory anyway. The whole charge of disloyalty and hatred seems both wrong and dismissive of any criticisms that might be fair.

  • In Europe, both the Left and the Right have traditionally regarded universal conscription as the counterpart to universal suffrage.

    Bully for them. Absent a general mobilization, it was only in effect in this country from March 1948 to January 1973, and at times (e.g. the year my father enlisted), draft calls were minimal. Most in the age group subject preferred to enlist rather than wait for a draft notice (something true of nearly all of our Presidential candidates born between 1926 and 1954 who served, to take one set of examples).

  • Its just more “being a patriot and being willing to fight and die for freedom does not mean we never question US policy nor assume that every single US solider or cop is a saint”.

    That is called a “strawman.” It mischaraterizes the other side to make the side he’s defending seem more reasonable. It works, which is why it’s used so much, but it’s still a fallacy which needs to be called out.

    Without being fully aware of what they are doing, white people step to the other side of the street, clutch their bags, etc when confronted particularity with non-white youths.
    A favorite actor of mine reinforced that when you search for racism, you will find it.
    Avery Brooks told a story about how a woman didn’t enter an elevator, alone, with him.
    He assumed it was because he’s black.
    Not because he’s a guy with an epic scowl that’s over six foot tall, and it’s stupid to get in an elevator alone with a guy. (Which he should know, he’s got kids.)
    Likewise, an honest reporter who is black noticed that people weren’t sitting next to his son on the bus unless there was no option.
    He got one of his son’s friends (who isn’t) to come and sit on the bus, and discovered that nobody sits next to a teenage boy on the bus unless there’s no other option.
    People avoid sitting near anybody at all if there’s an option, barring special situations.

  • People will never know how many wars and crimes are prevented by the Armed Forces and by the peace keeping officers, who are the police, by their very presence and by their very willingness to lay down their lives for their neighbor, us.
    .
    The liberals, in their arrogance, refuse to be grateful for the freedom they take for granted and the blood they refuse to acknowledge, spilled for their right to criticise and condemn.
    .
    How really sad for the liberals never to have experienced love of country.

  • Foxfier: I am studying both your and Donald McClarey’s comments.
    .
    “People avoid sitting near anybody at all if there’s an option, barring special situations.”
    .
    Excellent take down. It is called “personal space” and is included in body language and is a right of privacy. It is what our men and women in uniform fight to protect: our freedom.

  • Wall Street Journal letters to editor printed years ago:

    “Where do we find these young men? They grow here, somehow unchanged by the skeptics and cynics all around them. In an instant they make decisions of such gravity that all else seems irrelevant and minimized. How do we deserve these young men? We support them. We honor them. We remember their sacrifice. We win this war.”
    Jim Gribbel
    Freeport, Maine
    .

    “Our society worships so many false heroes, including our politicians, who get where they are by convincing us that all they care about is us, when what they really care about is themselves. Comparing our politicians and our military personnel is comparing the most selfish to the most selfless.

    .

    “It is beyond sad and tragic that, in the main, our media fail to tell the story of the real heroes in Iraq, Afghanistan and around the world, who have kept us safe from various evils risking all and, sometimes, giving their lives.
    .

    “God bless the men and women of the United States Armed Forces and shame on those who don’t know who the real heroes are.”
    John L. Sorg
    McCordsville, Ind.

  • FOxtIErR: The stories you reported don’t disprove my main point, but rather exist alongside them. Yes people might be uncomfortable in the situations described, yet what I described happens as well and is fairly well documented.

    I also would argue that a strawman Argument was used about the author when he was said to hate both America and the military despite saying specifically he thought individual soldiers were heroic.

    Mary: I am a liberal AND patriotic. Whats more There are countless liberals who serve. Finally, those who critique would argue trying to make sure something is the best it,can be is a high form of love.

  • I apologize for the misspelling. Computer not being helpful.

  • I also would argue that a strawman Argument was used about the author when he was said to hate both America and the military despite saying specifically he thought individual soldiers were heroic.

    Finding individuals heroic does not rule out hating the US and the military, and in fact from what I’ve seen it’s pretty common, both sincerely and as a rhetorical defense– a variation on the “no true scotsman” but in reverse. All good traits are handed to individuals, all bad to the targeted group(s).
    So that is not a strawman, nor a mischaracterization.

    Yes people might be uncomfortable in the situations described, yet what I described happens as well and is fairly well documented.

    Correction: the accusation is leveled extremely often. Support for the issue being racial, rather than something much more basic and obvious, is rather lacking. Even in the face of overwhelming evidence against racism being involved, people still insist that they can read the hearts of those accused.

  • I apologize for the misspelling. Computer not being helpful.

    Considering the reasons and ways my name is usually misspelled, it’s a delight to run into someone who just goes “oops.” 🙂

  • Watcher 7689, are you a liberal and patriotic enough to protect the newly begotten sovereign person, our constitutional posterity from being destroyed in the womb? If you are not, you and I do not speak the same language, even your criticisms do not uplift.

  • It was Léon Blum, after all, who declared that “no citizen should be denied the right, nor relieved of the responsibility, of defending the nation under arms”…
    –Michael Paterson-Seymour

    MSP, you left out the part in which Léon Blum declared that females aren’t citizens.
    Ha ha.

Compare and Contrast

Tuesday, September 23, AD 2014

Reagan saluting

Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We did not pass it to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected, and handed on for them to do the same, or one day we will spend our sunset years telling our children and our children’s children what it was once like in the United States where men were free.

                                         Ronald Reagan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coffee Cup Salute

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16 Responses to Compare and Contrast

  • Mr. Reagan was born in 1911 to a mother and father who were married from 1904 until the latter’s death in 1941, who lived in small midwestern towns the whole time, who lived for the most part on sales commissions and proprietor’s income, and of whom the mother was a pillar of one of the local protestant congregations. He lived all of his formative years in the sort of milieux where people adhered to a certain formality and had a regard for appearances and ‘the decent drapery of life’ and spent years in the Army Reserve. BO was born in 1961 consequent to a shag session of two people who demonstrated all their lives a talent for being self-centered. He spent the bulk of his upbringing in Honolulu, a town which was nothing if not informal. His time spent in the military approximated that of Madonna.

  • Exactly why do Presidents return the Marines’ salutes? It’s quite recent, I suspect it started with Pres. Reagan. I couldn’t find any vids of previous presidents boarding AF1 but it would be interesting to check old newsreel/broadcast footage to see if Eisenhower, JFK, Nixon, &c saluted.

    As for Obama saluting with a coffee cup — please, there are plenty of other reasons to dislike him.

  • It shows a self-absorption Thomas unworthy of his office. He is a small, petty man and this is a symbol of it. Reagan always returned salutes which makes sense due to the President being commander-in-chief. Earlier Presidents did also, including George Washington and Abraham Lincoln.

  • “Reagan always returned salutes which makes sense due to the President being commander-in-chief “…of the Armed Forces making the Commander-in-Chief an officer in the armed forces. and Obama needs to discipline himself in the salute to the American Flag or get out of the American White House.

  • What another example of the petty little man in the White House.

  • A salute is a courtesy,

    Yes, the president in civilian clothes (like any one) may return a salute, on the general proposition that courtesies should be returned. But if you return it one should do so with courtesy.

    A marine who saluted like that would be doing push-ups until a year after his enlistment expired.

  • “the petty little man in the White House”…is a disgrace.

  • There are tens of millions of Americans that are baser: each fleck of human flotsam that voted for the no-account, Alinsky-ite racial racketeer.

    They haven’t a clue but they are getting what they deserve.

  • In the British armed services, one does not salute when not in full uniform. That includes officers in mess-dress (i.e. without headgear)

    The only time we see the sovereign returning a salute is at Trooping the Colour – the only occasion when HM wears military uniform.

  • MPS: HM is always at attention. A coffee cup? Obama does not have two hands? It was not a sight insult, it may have been planned.

  • Slight insults become treason when planned.

  • Mary De Voe wrote, “HM is always at attention”
    Absolutely!

  • I do not usually comment on things of a political nature in here, but this is appalling

  • T Shaw asked “HM Who?”

    Her Majesty the Queen, referring back to the sovereign in the first part of the sentence.

Too Political

Tuesday, September 16, AD 2014

I wish I were more surprised by this:

CBS Sports rejected a 30-second ad consisting entirely of a little girl saying the Pledge of Allegiance, telling the sponsor simply that the ad was “too political” to air. 

Windermere Real Estate/Tri-Cities owner Dave Retter says he thought the cute video showing his granddaughter saying the Pledge of Allegiance, shown after the anniversary of 9/11 and before the quintessentially American sport, a rodeo, would be part of the coverage of the Wrangler Champions Challenge rodeo, shown on September 14. Retter’s company was one of two companies sponsoring the broadcast of the rodeo.

The brief ad had no reference to any political party, simply consisting of a little girl with her hand over her heart reciting the pledge recited in schools across the country for decades and the words “…our future” preceding it. Despite the harmless nature and clearly positive intentions of the ad, CBS rejected it on grounds of being “too political.”

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9 Responses to Too Political

  • Sadly, seen on Facebook. A public school somewhere in Amerika banned a US soldier in uniform from bringing his little daughter to school.

    The supply of small-arms ammunition is woefully deficient in view of the need.

  • One is reminded of the comment by Berthold Brecht, after the June 1953 uprising in East Germany. The secretary of the writers union issued a statement that “the people had forfeited the confidence of the government and could only win it back by redoubled efforts.” In response to which, Brecht observed, “Would it not be easier, in that case, for the government to dissolve the people and elect another?”

  • C ommunist
    B roadcast
    S ystem

    Other potential advertisers need to take note. Hit the new red army in accounts receivables.

  • Our minor children no longer know and understand the meaning of the virtues of patriotism, allegiance, loyalty, integrity, decency and honesty, virtues exercised through free will and freedom.
    .
    CBS will not allow people to be exposed to these virtues or to think and decide for themselves.
    .
    Karl Marx is raising up a new subclass of orcs.
    .
    I am glad I do not watch CBS. CBS stands for Columbia Broadcasting System. Columbia stands atop the White House dome and is the personification of freedom and of the U.S.A.
    .
    T Shaw: “The supply of small-arms ammunition is woefully deficient in view of the need.”
    .
    I cannot agree more.

  • “bleep out “under God”” Atheism imposed by orcs. “or prohibit the free exercise thereof.”

  • T. Shaw, I read the news article you’re referring to– a couple of days ago,
    Lieutenant Colonel Sherwood Baker was in uniform while dropping his
    daughter off at her new school in Rochester, Michigan. The school’s security
    guard refused the Army officer admission to the school because the sight
    of the uniform ‘might offend a student’. I believe Lt. Col. Baker appealed to
    other school staff, who reiterated security’s demand…
    .
    (Since the incident, the Rochester Superintendent of Schools has issued a
    public apology to Lt. Col. Baker and his family.)
    .
    It’s curious how the apparatchiks who are so solicitous on the behalf of those
    who “might be offended” never seem to worry about the sensibilities of
    those whose worldview is more on the starboard side? CBS bans video of a
    little girl reciting the Pledge, yet their show Two and a Half Men, (which
    once starred the egregious Charlie Sheen) will apparently be ending it’s run
    with its two male leads marrying each other and adopting a child. Evidently,
    in the new normal, no one could possibly be offended by any of that– no
    one who matters, at least…

  • It’s harvest time.
    Autumn is finding its way to Northern Michigan. The leaves are just about to turn color.
    It’s time for the harvest.

    Weeds in with the wheat.
    No problem.
    The weeds will be separated from the wheat. The harvest master will see to it!
    Enjoy the sun (Son) you wheat!

  • These “sports” outfits are getting WAY too political (left).

  • They weren’t afraid it would offend Someone Else – they are offended themselves. I think some of the America haters just a a visceral reaction the rest of us can’t understand.
    Likewise The president and his friends and family don’t understand our love of America and are afraid of us. Same for Lois Lerner etal

Flag Day 2014

Saturday, June 14, AD 2014

The American democratic experiment has been successful in many ways. Millions of people around the world look to the United States as a model in their search for freedom, dignity, and prosperity. But the continuing success of American democracy depends on the degree to which each new generation, native-born and immigrant, makes its own the moral truths on which the Founding Fathers staked the future of your Republic. Their commitment to build a free society with liberty and justice for all must be constantly renewed if the United States is to fulfill the destiny to which the Founders pledged their “lives . . . fortunes . . . and sacred honor.”

Saint John Paul II, December 16, 1997

 

 

Something for the weekend.  There is only one song for Flag Day:  The Star Spangled Banner.

Here is the history behind the song:

Back when I was young and dinosaurs ruled the Earth, it was customary for the National Anthem to be played before television stations signed off for the evening.  This was always my favorite of such renditions:

Red Skelton’s immortal rendition of the Pledge of Allegiance seems called for on this day:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2HGHdFmu5GU

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6 Responses to Flag Day 2014

  • Don, why do you keep referring to American democracy? There’s no such animal. We’re a republic, not a democracy.

  • Saint John Paul II referred to Democracy and not I in the above post. More to the point, words change over time. The Founding Fathers, most of whom were classically educated, abhorred the idea of democracy because of the bad press that it got in Thucydides, Plutarch, et al. Over time the term democracy has become a descriptor of government “of the people, by the people and for the people” in Lincoln’s immortal phrase. My own personal preference is that we could use more democracy in this country, in the sense of legislatures actually making laws, rather than court’s acting like super legislatures and government agencies also usurping that role. Courts and executive agencies are the true foes of popular government in our time, rather than too much democracy as feared by the Founding Fathers.

  • Stephen Dalton is correct to the extent that Democracy means a system of government where a simple majority can take away the individual right to life, liberty or property (the fruit of one’s own labor).
    .
    Donald is correct to the extent that Democracy refers to a representative system of government where:
    .
    (1) The legislature makes laws consistent with the principle of the individual right to life, liberty and property (the fruit of one’s own labor)
    .
    (2) The executive enforces those laws to protect individuals and families, and where the powers of both government and big business are limited.
    .
    (3) The judiciary makes decisions based on the Constitution being a fixed contract protecting the sovereign citizen and not a living document subjugated to the dictatorship of relativistic morality.
    .
    What Thucidides wrote is perhaps an ideal that we no longer have in this country:
    ,
    “Our constitution does not copy the laws of neighbouring states; we are rather a pattern to others than imitators ourselves. Its administration favours the many instead of the few; this is why it is called a democracy. If we look to the laws, they afford equal justice to all in their private differences; if no social standing, advancement in public life falls to reputation for capacity, class considerations not being allowed to interfere with merit; nor again does poverty bar the way, if a man is able to serve the state, he is not hindered by the obscurity of his condition. The freedom which we enjoy in our government extends also to our ordinary life. There, far from exercising a jealous surveillance over each other, we do not feel called upon to be angry with our neighbour for doing what he likes, or even to indulge in those injurious looks which cannot fail to be offensive, although they inflict no positive penalty. But all this ease in our private relations does not make us lawless as citizens. Against this fear is our chief safeguard, teaching us to obey the magistrates and the laws, particularly such as regard the protection of the injured, whether they are actually on the statute book, or belong to that code which, although unwritten, yet cannot be broken without acknowledged disgrace.”
    .
    Rather, the people of the United States have become like that of ancient Israel in 1st Samuel chapter 8: “Give us a king like that of other nations.” God granted us our wish and we have that godless man of sin and depravity – Barack Hussein Obama and his wife Jezebel. History repeats itself over and over again. The problem is not Democracy or Republicanism or Monarchy. The problem is the concupiscence of man’s heart. Until the heart changes, then nothing changes. As St. JP II is quoted above to have said:
    .
    “But the continuing success of American democracy depends on the degree to which each new generation, native-born and immigrant, makes its own the moral truths on which the Founding Fathers staked the future of your Republic.”
    .
    The Democratic Party is completely opposed to this and the Republican Party is hypocritical and toothless.

  • Donald: I do not know how you do it, but I am glad that you do.
    .
    “My own personal preference is that we could use more democracy in this country, in the sense of legislatures actually making laws, rather than court’s acting like super legislatures and government agencies also usurping that role. Courts and executive agencies are the true foes of popular government in our time, rather than too much democracy as feared by the Founding Fathers.”
    .
    Much like the prodigal son, Congress has spent our privilege, its power, in non-essential ways, handing our freedom over to tyrants on every level.
    .
    For instance: Congress never voted on the HHS Mandate. No American citizen ever voted for or against the HHS Mandate, not anybody. Therefore, the HHS Mandate is unconstitutional, having not been ratified by the people or the voice of the people in Congress.
    .
    The HHS Mandate was added after Congress had passed the ACA known as Obamacare, in the stealth of the night, because Congress allowed that anything can be changed in the bill at any time by anyone, making the citizens voiceless subjects under the existing regime. All bills passed have this open ended requirement. Thus, Congress forfeited the will of the people and the balance of power in government. Why should Hobby Lobby obey a law that was never a law? The HHS Mandate was never passed by the voice of and the will of the people. Whatever the HHS Mandate is, it is not a law passed by Congress and the will of the people.
    .
    Now, the Supreme Court is being abused to impose an unconstitutional contrivance on the American People. Who in heaven and on earth gave Sebelius, or even Obama, the power to write law for the nation, using their own personal opinion to impose decrees and penalties? The people never gave Congress that authentic authority to ostracize the American people from participation in our Republic.
    .
    Even if the HHS Mandate decreed that all American Citizens must have one ice cream cone every day, the law was never passed by Congress. The HHS Mandate is not a law. Whatever the HHS Mandate is, it is not a law passed by Congress and the will of the people.
    .
    Heaven knows American citizens and our tax dollars have helped any one in need around the globe. All of American generosity was voted for by the people through Congress. Extorted charity is stealing and does not happen in any democracy or Republic.
    .
    The HHS Mandate was not put to a vote in Congress, nor was the Mandate put on the ballot and therefore the HHS Mandate is not a law.
    .
    The same goes for prayer ban, the destruction of the living human being in the womb, our constitutional posterity, and the absolute mockery of human beings by denying their rational, immortal souls, created in innocence and virginity, male and female.
    .
    First, acknowledge God, next the sovereign person and then, and only then, proceed with government.

  • Donald M McClarey

    Words do, indeed, change their meaning over time

    Rousseau’s idea of democracy was drawn from the Landesgemeinde of his native Switzerland, as described by Lord Acton, “The idea was that the grown men met in the market-place, like the peasants of Glarus under their trees, to manage their affairs, making and unmaking officials, conferring and revoking powers. They were equal, because every man had exactly the same right to defend his interest by the guarantee of his vote. The welfare of all was safe in the hands of all, for they had not the separate interests that are bred by the egotism of wealth, nor the exclusive views that come from a distorted education. All being equal in power and similar in purpose, there can be no just cause why some should move apart and break into minorities.

    Hence, his famous warning in the Social Contract, “As soon as public service ceases to be the chief business of the citizens, and they would rather serve with their money than with their persons, the State is not far from its fall. When it is necessary to march out to war, they pay troops and stay at home: when it is necessary to meet in council, they name deputies and stay at home. By reason of idleness and money, they end by having soldiers to enslave their country and representatives to sell it.”

  • Back when I was young and dinosaurs ruled the Earth, it was customary for the National Anthem to be played before television stations signed off for the evening.

     
    Stations also played the National Anthem in the morning when they began broadcasting for the day.
     
    America was a different country back then.

Too American

Monday, July 29, AD 2013

20 Responses to Too American

  • What was that line about being lukewarm?

  • http://dailycaller.com/2013/07/29/creative-director-of-911-memorial-museum-not-such-a-big-fan-of-america/

    __

    One of the main problems in the country today is that too many people in positions of authority really do not have an ounce of patriotism and simply do not like America.

    The curator in question is an issue of Harvard University (class of 1970 or thereabouts).

  • As a Canadian I have always LOVED the way Americans have expressed their love and patriotism,for and of their country.

    Something awful has happened to your country. Your politicians and Administrators consider themselves Patricians-so far above the plerbians or the hoi polli.

    Patriotism is outre because it is TOO COMMON and these effete Liberals want to dictate the conversation and the agenda.As Catholics and Americans it is time to take your country back from the dark diabolically influenced coven or cabal and return it to it’s former exceptional status.

    Canadians by nature are quiet about our Patriotism BUT not our current Conservative Government.The leftist institutional poo-bahs like the CBC elite-Communist Broadcasting Commission or the publishers of the Toronto “Red” Star are keeping a much lower profile because while Canadians are slow to anger once angry,stand back-just ask the SS survivors from WWII.

    Please take your country back and save it from the effete “elite”,the pornifiers,the vulgarizers and DOMESTIC ENEMIES that are like a viper at America’s heart.

    Best wishes and prayers from your Canadian Brother in Christ.

  • I love my country. I was born here, even though my grandparents were immigrants, it has never ever run through my mind to bad mouth this USA. Disagree with, yes, protest about policies, yes, but to dislike or hate where I live would be like some of the animals who foul their nests and then build new ones somewhere else. One of Author Taylor Caldwell once put some words in the mouth of her character: ” If we think this country is going down the wrong way, we had better roll up our sleeves and get it back!” Not a precise citation, but we have a job in this America, we, the ones who live here, to get America back to what it was made to be. A bastion of freedom, not license, somewhere that people, ordinary people, can live without fear of being arrested for being your religion. God please help us to live the life that you want us to , and to do the one job that You have put us here to do, show the world Your life.

  • They need to write history to advance their agenda.

    I bet he displays not one picture of the scores (if not hundreds) that jumped rather than be incinerated.

    Shulan and all self-hating, elitist spucatum, with their deep-rooted disgust with the uses most Americans make of our freedoms, can go to hell.

  • Pingback: Who Am I To Judge? - BigPulpit.com
  • “As a Canadian”
    Thank you Gordon! A song I learned growing up courtesy of my “Newfie” Mom:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OxOhk4Lk9aE

  • @Gordon Campbell: St. Joseph, patron of Canada, pray for us!

  • I recall a monument in front of a Catholic school in New Jersey that said simply,
    “God – Family – Country”. Patriotism is a virtue and a manifestation of the love of our neighbor.

  • Reading this I kept hearing the Marseillaise (with cannon booming). That song brings a full feeling in my chest and behind my eyes because it calls to the true hearted people of the countryside, who knew their patrimony; and I apply it to us. Gordon’s note also seems to be calling those of us who are like the people referenced in the opening lines of that anthem.
    I pity the poor ones among us who have not recognized how they have been blessed by being Americans. It seems they are distracted by a kind of false worldliness, with savoir faire to beat the band– but sans the simple knowledge that everything of any value is at home.

  • “America is unique, but we should not make too much of its uniqueness. In the long run we love our country for the same reasons any man loves his country–not for things that can be bragged about, but for things that can hardly be communicated, and are understood by outsiders mostly by analogy with their own patriotic affections. You communicate your love for your mother not by expatiating on your mother’s singular virtues, still less by calling her the Great Mother, but simply by using the word ‘mother.’ Every man born of woman will understand. Well, almost every man. There is always the occasional misfit who is alienated from his mother, or who thinks that motherhood is outmoded. But it is wisest to direct the conversation to the others.”

    -Joseph Sobran

  • Educate me, J. Christian. What does Sobran’s commentary have to do with a museum curator who cannot abide a photograph of firefighters raising a flag?

  • The curator is the misfit, using Sobran’s formulation.

  • Gordon, you are not the first Gordon to offer Americans an encouraging word. This journalist did so around the time our misguided curator was completing his indoctrination at Harvard:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJ_okAgAUGE

  • Eh- Mike Petrik! Wonderful link I will pass it on to our family

  • The curator is the misfit, using Sobran’s formulation.

    Unfortunately, the misfit is in a gatekeeper position which distorts and disfigures public memorial.

  • My best memory of 9-11 wasn’t the day it occurred (I didn’t watch TV at the time; still don’t), but a couple of days later, when all the planes, etc were still grounded. That week-end was the “balloon fest” in our town. Dozens of balloons from all over the country come one week-end in September to go ballooning and engage in some kind of balloon completion. (The balloonists also visit various schools, have a food drive, etc. And because of the attacks, they too were grounded.

    Nevertheless, the pilots were allowed to inflate their balloons at dusk to float them up just a few feet while tethered to the ground. They would turn the burners up on “high” and the balloons would really illuminate. Beautiful sight. They do that every year, but that year it just seemed very impressive. And I remember thinking how great the US was and how we would never be defeated. If you could have put that feeling down on paper, I’m pretty sure the museum director would have labelled it “kitschy” and “rah-rah American.”

  • @Donald R. McClarey-Newfies ROCK !

    Ask your Mom what the pun is.

    Thanks for the song Bro.We are ALL in this together.

  • @WK Aiken-AMEN.Patron Saint of the Church and my 18 year old son.Thanks for your blessing.

    Mary,Immaculate Conception,patroness of the United States of America,pray for us.

    Our Lady of Guadeloupe,patroness of the Americas,pray for us.

    St.Katerina(she belongs to BOTH of us) pray for us.

    Sacred Heart of Jesus have mercy on us.

  • @Mike Petrik.Mike I’m old enough to remember when Gordon Sinclair made the original broadcast on CFRB and even though I was a kid,I knew he had said something quite important.I was very proud of him and the solace it provided to our brothers and sisters who were under siege,within and without-not unlike today.

    America will NEVER be down for long-the Free World NEEDS you back in the saddle-CANADA needs you. You’ve survived tougher times than this-you’ll survive this horrific Administration and the dying corrupt Vichy Main Stream Media.

    God Bless President Reagan and God Bless America.

Top Ten Patriotic Movies for the Fourth

Wednesday, July 3, AD 2013

(This post originally ran in 2010.  The movies listed would make excellent viewing tomorrow and any day.)

 

 

Last year I listed here my top ten picks for movies about the America Revolution for the Fourth.  This year here is my list of patriotic movies for the Fourth.

10. National Treasure (2004)-Sure it’s cursed with a ridiculous plot involving the masons and a treasure, it is still a lot of fun and calls us back to the foundation document, the Declaration of Independence, that is the cornerstone of our Republic.

9. Hamburger Hill (1987)-Content advisory: very, very strong language in the video clip which may be viewed here.  All the Vietnam veterans I’ve mentioned it to have nothing but praise for this film which depicts the assault on Hill 937 by elements of the 101rst Division, May 10-20, 1969.  It is a fitting tribute to the valor of the American troops who served their country in an unpopular war a great deal better than their country served them.

8.    Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942)-James Cagney in perhaps the greatest film bio of them all, a salute to George M. Cohan, the legendary composer, playwright and patriot.

7.    The Alamo (1960)-“The Republic” scene from The Alamo, a film which was basically John Wayne’s love note to America.

6.    Gettysburg (1993)-The movie that I think comes the closest to conveying to us the passions of the Civil War.  You really can’t understand America unless you understand the Civil War.  As Shelby Foote, one of the greatest historians of the war, said:  “Any understanding of this nation has to be based, and I mean really based, on an understanding of the Civil War. I believe that firmly. It defined us. The Revolution did what it did. Our involvement in European wars, beginning with the First World War, did what it did. But the Civil War defined us as what we are and it opened us to being what we became, good and bad things. And it is very necessary, if you are going to understand the American character in the twentieth century, to learn about this enormous catastrophe of the mid-nineteenth century. It was the crossroads of our being, and it was a hell of a crossroads.”

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One Response to Top Ten Patriotic Movies for the Fourth

Thanksgiving 1952: Red Skelton

Sunday, November 27, AD 2011

Red Skelton rose from poverty to become one of the most popular comedians of his day.  A comedic genius, he created a gallery of comedic personas:  Clem Kaddidlehopper, the Mean Little Kid, San Fernando Red, Freddie the Freeloader  and others, which allowed him not only to amuse but also to engage in wry commentary about some of the foibles of his time. Skelton the man was fairly simple:  he liked to make people laugh, and he loved God, Country and Kids.  The love of God and his dying son I have written about in the post The Pope, the Clown and the Cross.  Skelton’s love of God and Country shines through in his rendition of the Pledge of Allegiance which I have written about here.

His love of kids was no mere entertainer’s pose as the following anecdote illustrates:

“Funny how you can go to a doctor’s offices and find magazines that are years old in the lobby. I had to go to a dentist two week ago and found a Golf magazine from the 80’s. I also found a magazine that told me the following story:

Decades ago, a young American was flying across the mountain ranges of Europe on his way to London. Accompanying his friend, a Catholic priest, the two were scheduled to have a meeting with the Pope in England. As the priest talked, the plane suddenly rocked. Then rocked again.  Something told the priest the plane was not destined to ever touch land again.

The passengers, busy in their individual conversations, failed to notice, the priest observed, until a flight attendant made an announcement of impending doom. The plane was over a mountain range and losing altitude.

As expected, panic set in.

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3 Responses to Thanksgiving 1952: Red Skelton

Paul Krugman and Hatriotism

Monday, September 12, AD 2011

 

Yesterday while almost all Americans were recalling 9/11 with sadness, mixed with pride for the heroism and self-sacrifice amply displayed by so many of their fellow citizens that dark day, economist Paul Krugman in his blog, hilariously entitled Conscience of a Liberal,  at the, where else, New York Times, posted this:

The Years of Shame

Is it just me, or are the 9/11 commemorations oddly subdued?

Actually, I don’t think it’s me, and it’s not really that odd.

What happened after 9/11 — and I think even people on the right know this, whether they admit it or not — was deeply shameful. Te atrocity should have been a unifying event, but instead it became a wedge issue. Fake heroes like Bernie Kerik, Rudy Giuliani, and, yes, George W. Bush raced to cash in on the horror. And then the attack was used to justify an unrelated war the neocons wanted to fight, for all the wrong reasons.

A lot of other people behaved badly. How many of our professional pundits — people who should have understood very well what was happening — took the easy way out, turning a blind eye to the corruption and lending their support to the hijacking of the atrocity?

The memory of 9/11 has been irrevocably poisoned; it has become an occasion for shame. And in its heart, the nation knows it.

I’m not going to allow comments on this post, for obvious reasons.

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17 Responses to Paul Krugman and Hatriotism

  • Krugamn & Co are way too smart for all that old-fashioned “God Bless America” claptrap. They snigger at the hardhats chanting “USA! USA!” and the “God and guns” morons who inhabit who inhabit flyover country.

    Give me Archie Bunker any day.

  • Talk about projection.

    The only thing I am ashamed re: 9/11 of is that Krugman is a countryman of mine.

  • What’s really funny about this is that there was a marked sense of unity immediately following 9/11 as well as an increase in church attendance. GWB was increasing in popularity and was receiving support from many or most on the left. It wasn’t until the Dems realized they can’t win elections by taking the position of “yeah, what Bush said” that they commenced building a wedge and driving it in.

    There’s a reason why Krugman is only respected by the NYT editorial board and one other guy, and it is coherent thought.

  • Charcters like Krugman are demographically unimportant. Unfortunately, they often hold consequential positions in the world of public discourse. How that came to be and what is to be done about it are the interesting questions.

  • Indeed, Art.

    Also, it strikes me, Krugman’s wish for the “unity” that might have been reflects the Orwellian concept of unity which predominates among extreme partisans of all sorts: the idea that “unity” consists of a world completely cleansed of those with whom one disagrees. Krugman could only find the unity which he wishes he could look back on if most of the population of the country ceased to exist.

  • …and it is coherent thought.

    Ugh! ISN’T Duh…

  • I dunno. I’m no fan of Krugman, but he’s putting the blame on the politicians he disagrees with, and only secondarily on the country for letting the politicians get away with (what he thinks are) their misdeeds. Everyone but the most chauvanistic gets frustrated at his country for not following his vision for it.

  • Charcters like Krugman are demographically unimportant. Unfortunately, they often hold consequential positions in the world of public discourse.

    I hope it’s just the squeaky hinge problem, but I fear it isn’t… local radio jocks have been making the same sort of “What happened to our unity, why can’t you horrible nasty people be unified” type arguments, and some of my relatives (Alright, by marriage, and known flakes, but still) are echoing it.

  • Krugman is supposed to be an economist, which is a job for people who tell people why they don’t have jobs. He’s out of his league on most issues, along with Friedman, Dodd & Co.

  • Paul really needs to stop giving his wife free rein to add his byline to her rants. His reputation as a pundit is getting cuckolded.

  • The American Catholic?

    You bring me back to my youth with Brooklyn Tablet.

  • Sir Walter Scott.

    Very good, Don, and very apt.
    Krugman needs some HTFU pills.

  • Krugman was labeled by national Review Online as the Most Dangerous Man in America (this was before Obumbler was elected President).

    Krugman’s writing would get him run out of town in most American cities and towns, but in New York, the epicenter of 9/11, he has his constituency, as well as a lousy, third rate publication with an editorial policy that puts it beneath the National Enquirer that provides him with the means to blather.

    The New York Times is a despicable piece of garbage. I do not know why Carlos Slim puts his money into it – without Slim the paper would have gone out of business.

  • Another thing: he complained about a “subdued” observance of 9/11! What did Krugman want, the country to make like it was the Fourth of July, with fireworks and marching bands? The people at Ground Zero, Shanksville and the Pentagon were solemnly commemorating the anniversary of a mass murder. I don’t know if Krugman was in NY on 9/11, (he seems to reside in a galaxy of his own making), but, gee, Paul, surely someone told you it wasn’t a happy day.

  • Another thing: he complained about a “subdued” observance of 9/11! What did Krugman want, the country to make like it was the Fourth of July, with fireworks and marching bands?

    Well, clearly if it was not subdued it would have featured Obama and Greek columns — not to mention the oceans ceasing to rise.

    It strikes me that to any sane person somber commemorations are quiet natural. Our parish had asked policemen, firemen and military personnel to come in uniform and had a blessing out by the flag pole after mass. Our pastor read our Pope Benedict’s prayer from when he visited Ground Zero.

    Sure, it’s just one small town in Ohio, but there’s not a single other commemoration (including Memorial Day or the 4th of July) which gets that level of attendance and participation for something outside of mass. I think every single person who was at mass came — no one just hurried home.

  • Agreed, Donna V., that “oddly subdued” is a puzzling turn of phrase, considering the gravity of the events being recalled. Reading on, it appears that another ten or eleven phrases in Mr. Krugman’s brief post are also quite beyond my understanding.

    I know a “hatriot” and he is without a doubt the unhappiest person of my acquaintance. And he wants everyone to be just like him.

  • Crunkman. Glugman. Drugman.

    At least I’m a happy drunk. Queued up some of that Gosling’s Black Seal, mates.

Philip Nolan and Flag Day

Tuesday, June 14, AD 2011

Today is Flag Day.  Edward Everett Hale, in his short story A Man Without A Country, reminds us that patriotism is a very powerful form of love.  Hale, a great nephew of Nathan Hale who died on a British scaffold and uttered the deathless  “I only regret, that I have but one life to lose for my country.”, wrote the story in the midst of the Civil War in 1863 to help inspire patriotism.

The story is a simple one.  Philip Nolan was a young artillery lieutenant in the United States Army.  He became involved in the  vague scheme of Aaron Burr to detach some territory from the  United States and form an independent nation.  All the big fish escape conviction, but Lieutenant Nolan does not.  At his courtmartial the following takes place:

One and another of the colonels and majors were tried, and, to fill out the list, little Nolan, against whom, Heaven knows, there was evidence enough,–that he was sick of the service, had been willing to be false to it, and would have obeyed any order to march any-whither with any one who would follow him had the order been signed, “By command of His Exc.A. Burr.” The courts dragged on. The big flies escaped,–rightly for all I know. Nolan was proved guilty enough, as I say; yet you and I would never have heard of him, reader, but that, when the president of the court asked him at the close whether he wished to say anything to show that he had always been faithful to the United States, he cried out, in a fit of frenzy,–

“Damn the United States! I wish I may never hear of the United States again!”

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4 Responses to Philip Nolan and Flag Day

  • A very haunting work of fiction indeed. Allegedly, the character of Philip Nolan was inspired by a real-life figure, Cong. Clement L. Vallandingham of Ohio, a notorious Copperhead who was arrested for sedition by Maj. Gen. Ambrose Burnside at one point and exiled to Canada for a time. Supposedly, Vallandingham was overheard saying “Hang the U.S.; I hope the day comes when I never hear the name.”

  • Thanks. This has long been one of my favorite stories — one I can’t read without tears coming to my eyes at the end, softy that I am.

  • Darwin the TV movie from 1973 is just as good. Cliff Robertson was magnificent as Nolan.

    Elaine that is the first I’ve heard of Vallandigham inspiring the character of Nolan. Ugh! To say the least, Copperhead Clement has never been high on my list of figures from the Civil War!

  • Sorry for the man who sees Old Glory and does not feel love and pride.

    If I think about Philip Nolan I become angry. Nolan is nothing but an ancestor for liberal democrats. Only thing: progressives don’t repent.

    America is the worst country in the world except for all the others.

The Catholic Left and America the Evil

Tuesday, February 8, AD 2011

Thomas Peters took  the usual suspects, including Vox Nova, on the Catholic Left to task for ignoring Lila Rose’s new expose last week about Planned Parenthood a\k\a Worse Than Murder, Inc.  Mark Shea joined in.  In response Morning’s Minion at Vox Nova went on the offensive and blasted everyone to the right of Joseph Stalin after a pro forma condemnation of Planned Parenthood.  Nate Wildermuth made a more interesting contribution:

 

Thomas Peters and Mark Shea and those of like-mind rightfully point out that abortion and contraception are not understood correctly by many ‘progressive’ Catholics. When I lived in the Dorothy Day Catholic Worker House in Washington D.C., I participated in the vigils at Planned Parenthood, and asked a fellow Worker if she’d like to come. “Can’t do everything,” she said. “Not my thing.” And that’s the sort of answer that makes us think, “Wow, they just don’t get it.” The ongoing slaughter of children in the womb is one of the most frightening signs of the disintegration of Western Civilization.

And yet, standing so near the truth, Thomas Peters and Mark Shea and many of like-mind totally lose their minds. Example: they have likely Marched for Life in Washington D.C., but not before attending the idol-worshiping ceremonies that precede it, where the multitudes pledge their allegiance to a flag soaked in blood, to a Republic prostituted for Mammon, to a nation kneeling under a god called Constitution. “That’s just proper patriotism for the good parts of America,” they might say. But anyone who pledges allegiance to the American flag or gets goosebumps at the National Anthem just doesn’t get it: America is the greatest force for evil in the world in the history of mankind.

To get it means to be shell-shocked by the utter depravity of every aspect of the United States, to see that the game is up, that doom is allotted, and that abortion, war, poverty, and every kind of violence will continue unabated until the wrath and judgment of God is poured out upon this proud and blind people.

Like the blind men grasping at different parts of an elephant, we should waste less time denying what the other sees, and more time putting together the pieces, no matter how horrifying the conclusion.”

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55 Responses to The Catholic Left and America the Evil

  • “…Vox Nova went on the offensive…”

    Vox Nasty.

  • The left’s motive is psychological. They are solipsists, adopting the narcissistic illusion that –since everything depends upon us– all we need do is change our own behavior for everything to turn out right. It is akin to the co-dependent strategy of the child of an alcoholic, who strives to achieve perfect behavior in order to motivate the parent to change. To think otherwise is to concede that the world is a chaotic place that we cannot control, and demands of us difficult choices, responses of limited effect, and –above all– the uncertainty of faith.

  • Pro forma? Does that mean that MM’s condemnation of PP was insincere? Is he lying about his views on PP? Why would someone like MM, who has no compunction about sharing his views, feel the need to fudge here?

    Is it possible to be pro-life without making abortion the pre-eminent topic of one’s writing? (I write on the Eucharist far more than on abortion.) Is it even possible that one could be against abortion and disagree with the right about health care? Or must we assert that anyone who disagrees with the right about anything disagrees about abortion, even if they aren’t willing to say as much? MM doesn’t get to decide his own opinion on abortion, you will do it for him.

    It is one thing to disagree with MM (or any other fellow Catholic) on which public policy best serves the common good. It is another to imply his insincerity.

    If we at VN say nothing about abortion, we are pro-abortion. If we say something about abortion, it is not satisfactory if it does not toe the GOP line. Every post, and there are a lot of them, is just one more exception that proves the rule. There is a self-fulfilling prophecy going on here.

  • Also, I’m quite a bit right of Stalin and got no impression that I was in MM’s sites. A long list is not the same as a broad list.

  • Brett, MM voted for the most pro-abort President in our nation’s history. He is an unfailing shill for the Democrat party. Abortion obviously ranks very, very, very low on his order of priority.

  • Brett,

    Take a look at Morning’s Minions work at Vox-Nova. On the rare occasion that he bothers to even offer a mild rebuke of the abortion industry, he insists on following it up with a much harsher upbraiding of Republicans. Abortion to him is nothing more than a distraction from the bigger issues of government mandated health care and whatever pet leftist project he has in his cross-hairs.

    Nate’s comment is simply deranged. Can we put to bed the notion that we should take any of these fools seriously?

  • Wildermuth’s comments are warped and bizarre and I think reflect his own idiosyncratic pathologies. I would tend to suspect that the ill motives of the the general run of the Catholic left are far more commonplace.

  • I suppose there is a small grain of truth to the claim that the US is the greatest source of evil among nations. At present, it is the most powerful, and projects that power world-wide. No other country, except for China, perhaps, can project such power and China does not seem to be interested in doing so at this time, at least not in the same way as the US. But by the same token, the US is also arguably the greatest source of good among nations – no other country rushes to provide aid as much as the US. I don’t think it is necessarily inconsistent to be both – when you wield a lot of power, how you use it impacts for good or ill. It is manifestly unfair to only note the good or the bad. Just my own observation, but those on the right seem to overplay the good; those on the left overplay the bad.

  • MM voted for the most pro-abort President in our nation’s history.

    Have you mention this to the Justice Department? Given that MM is an Irish citizen and not entitled to vote, it seems you have accused him of a felony.

  • The basic error is in thinking that the “Catholic left” is Catholic at all.

  • Be careful. Disagreeing with Vox Nova’s America-hatred is condemned in Veritatis Splendour 80.

  • I was aware Katherine that MM is an Irish import. Considering that he endorsed Obama in a has-to-be-read-to-be-believed post on VN, I assumed that he had become a naturalized American citizen.

    http://vox-nova.com/2008/08/19/barack-obama-for-president/

  • And once again we see the validity of Paul’s Second Law: “Life is too short to read Vox Nova.”

  • I think any honest reader can see that MM believes the Democrats give us a better chance at reducing abortion in the US.

    A fair-minded person can disagree with his assessment.

    But I don’t think it is fair-minded to imply that he is faking a concern for the unborn.

    And we can work with those with whom we disagree much more easily than with those we don’t trust. Sowing distrust of pro-life democrats imperils the pro-life cause. It ensures that whenever the Dems take power, as they will every couple elections, the house and/or senate will be largely pro-choice because, no matter where abortion is on MM’s list of priorities, it is pretty low for most Americans.

    One can be wrong without being dishonest. I do it all the time. 😉

  • Brett,

    At best you’re being incredibly naive if you think that the Democratic party has become more indebted to the abortion industry because of pro-lifers sowing “distrust” of pro-life Democrats. The Democratic party has done this of its own accord, and so-called pro-life Democrats have aided and abetted the Democrats by their continued blind allegiance towards the party.

    One can be wrong without being dishonest

    And some can be both.

  • The main problem is that, unless you are a news portal or something like it, blogging is entirely idiosyncratic. You blog about what you blog about. Making an argument from silence is especially risky under those circumstances.

    I think it’s a lot more telling when the news media doesn’t cover a particular story (e.g., the serial killing spree of Kermit Gosnell) that otherwise pushes all the buttons which usually mandate close coverage.

  • “I think any honest reader can see that MM believes the Democrats give us a better chance at reducing abortion in the US.

    A fair-minded person can disagree with his assessment.”

    Actually, any truly honest person should. There is little in the Democratic Party that is intrinsically “pro-life.” One may argue that increasing “investments” in different social programs will result in decreased abortion rates. However, there is little evidence that such is the case as there is little evidence that increasing “investments” in most areas actually results in positive change (see education.) So one may hold that position but it is very weak and does not make one necessarily “pro-life.”

    But the Democratic Party is almost entirely in the hold of abortion on demand, at any stage of pregnancy and for some, including Obama, even after birth. This wholesale surrender to an intrinsic evil, which cannot be rationalized by “investments” of dubious value in other so-called “pro-life” issues, renders MM’s vociferous support of the Democratic Party offensive.

  • Brett,

    It’s not that I think MM was lying about opposing Planned Parenthood. I think he is sincerely against Planned Parenthood and against abortion. But I don’t think he cares about it very much. It clearly doesn’t get him exercised the way that, say, a post by Thomas Peters criticizing Vox Nova does.

  • Thanks for the re-post, Donald, and in its entirety no less. And perhaps you and your readers are correct — perhaps it is I who have lost my mind, rather than those who see abortion as a holocaust yet continue to believe in a holocausting nation. Time will tell.

  • No, I do not think you have lost your mind Nate. Frankly, I was quite surprised by the post. You and I have often differed over the years, but I have always respected the sincerity of your pacifism. The depth of your feeling against America shocked me. America is much more today than the evil of abortion, just as America was much more in the days of Lincoln than slavery.

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  • Brett,

    I made an honest go of being a Pro-Life Democrat. It cannot be done.

    I am a Pennsylvanian and I remember fondly Governor Casey. I was proud of his stand and furious as the Democrat Party’s retribution. I hung in there until 2006. I read every bio and supported pro-life dems at every turn. Then Governor Casey’s son, now Senator Casey, proved to me that there is no place for Catholic beliefs in the Democrat Party.

    It was with a heavy heart too that I switched my affiliation for I honestly believed that the calls to justice that theoretically underpin the Dem platform well articulated the Church’s preference for the poor. After more than a decade of blindness, I acknowledged that the entire platform was a fraud.

    What you believe about the Democrat Party is of no concern to me. I have heard every false argument imaginable about how one SHOULD be a Dem if one believes the Church’s teachings. Believe what you will but you shouldn’t be surprised to be called on it when the party that our fellow Catholics on the Left support runs utterly rampant over truth and right.

    For my part, the Republicans have my support as long as they are the better alternative to the Dems. I don’t believe that the GOP represents the only or even the right answer to many social questions… but the organization is certainly less wrong than the Democrat Party.

  • Brett,

    Maniac MM needs to be judged by what he does, not what he writes. Talk is cheap.

    Nate seems a nice guy and I bet he means well. He seemingly thinks his country is “holocaust nation” and anyone that pledges allegiance is evil, too. I doubt he means that. He possibly couldn’t dream up any other defense for catholic abortion sympathizers.

    I would draw to lefty caths’ attentions the parable of the pharisee and the publican in the temple. It was the humble sinner’s prayer that was counted.

    The road to hell is paved with good intentions.

  • My post is updated to reflect the ongoing critiques. God bless.

  • rather than those who see abortion as a holocaust yet continue to believe in a holocausting nation

    Nate, that policy was imposed on our elected officials by our frigging judges. It is an indicator of the decay the bar in particular and the professional-managerial bourgeoisie in general. “The Nation” has not had much to do with it.

    Calling attention to the United States in this regard is peculiar. Abortion is regrettably lawful throughout the Occident and in the Far East as well. Malta has held out.

  • Dude, yeah, I know she was crazy. I’m glad you broke up with her. But it’s been months, man. You’ve got to stop talking about her. It doesn’t matter what kind of crazy stuff she’s into these days. It’s over. Move on.

  • I really think it is outrageous and obscene to identify America as the (or as the updated post says “one of the”) greatest source of evil in the history of mankind.

    What western nation even has a pro-life movement with the numbers and influence of America?

    If one wanted to speak of the evil of the last few administrations, that would be a different matter. But that isn’t what is taking place here: the flag, the Constitution, the essence of America is what is being identified as “evil” here.

    One of the posters on the comment thread for Nate’s post made the following point as well:

    “Who is “we”? The country doesn’t have abortions. Pregnant women do, and each one is making an individual decision. I don’t see how those individual decisions can all be consolidated into one action and collective responsibility assigned”

    Precisely right. The evil of abortion was ultimately given to us by radical leftist and feminist SUBVERSIVES – adherents of an alien, foreign, anti-American ideology called Marxism and its variants – who burrowed their way into our academic and political institutions. The American people did not choose legalized abortion, they had it foisted upon them by the Supreme Court, which was in turn provoked to rule by a cabal of radical feminists who manipulated and use, and then discarded Norma McCorvey or “Roe” from the infamous decision – and who is now a famous pro-life activist, by the way!

    I agree that glory and honor must be given first to God, and obedience first to the Magisterium of the Church – having satisfied those requirements there is nothing wrong with recognizing the relative goodness of the United States.

    Speaking about the relatively GOOD conditions of the Church in America as opposed to Europe, Pope Leo XIII wrote:

    “The main factor, no doubt, in bringing things into this happy state were the ordinances and decrees of your synods, especially of those which in more recent times were convened and confirmed by the authority of the Apostolic See. But, moreover (a fact which it gives pleasure to acknowledge), thanks are due to the equity of the laws which obtain in America and to the customs of the well-ordered Republic. For the Church amongst you, unopposed by the Constitution and government of your nation, fettered by no hostile legislation, protected against violence by the common laws and the impartiality of the tribunals, is free to live and act without hindrance.” — Pope Leo XIII, Longinqua

    Leo went on to warn, however, that America’s condition of separation of Church and State was not ideal or preferred, and that the success of the Church would be even greater and more secure if she were rightly constituted. Being a majority Protestant nation, this couldn’t have happened then or now, but in principle it is true.

    Leo also said:

    “All intelligent men are agreed, and We Ourselves have with pleasure intimated it above, that America seems destined for greater things. Now, it is Our wish that the Catholic Church should not only share in, but help to bring about, this prospective greatness.”

    In a better era, when leaders were not consumed by envy and resentment, as well as false idealism and utopianism, this was an easily expressed thought by “all intelligent men.” And this when Catholics in America were still officially discriminated against in many places, and had to fight for respect in the public arena!

    So any argument that treats our fallen nature as if it doesn’t exist, or could one day be abolished, is simply asinine and ignorant to the good that actually does exist and can be preserved. And any argument that says we cannot appreciate – not worship but appreciate and even safeguard – our Constitution and our traditions as if it were a form of idolatry isn’t speaking like a Catholic, but rather a Jehova’s Witness.

  • And for all that, I STILL have moral qualms about the methods of Lila Rose. There is something about the use of deception on that scale that bothers me, even if it is for a good cause. I cannot shake the “feeling” that it is immoral, even though I as much as anyone on our side would like to see Planned Parenthood destroyed.

    In fact I have to be honest – I would have less of a problem with the actual destruction of a Planned Parenthood, say by a fire (in which no one was killed of course), than I do with the use of deception and entrapment.

  • Art, you really think that abortion is only happening in our country because of some accident of bad judges? As opposed to the ‘sexual revolution’ and countless other lies that infect the American Way of Life? Moreover, overturning Roe vs. Wade won’t stop the ‘elected officials’ in New York and California from letting the murder of babies continue.

    This is precisely what my post was about — missing the big picture, and thinking that except for a few bad people (usually over there), everything in America is basically fine. Everything isn’t basically fine. Secular humanism has the world by the throat, and the hand that squeezes has U.S.A. tattooed on it.

  • Donald, I appreciate your thoughts. But I wouldn’t say that I hate America, any more than I would hate the Titanic. I just don’t think its going anywhere good, and would like to help people get off before the thing sinks.

  • “and would like to help people get off before the thing sinks.”

    And go where Nate? I can’t think of a place on this planet where I would rather live. Judging from the immigration rates to this country, both legal and illegal, I think a great many non-Americans around the globe feel precisely the same way as I do.

  • I have a good many Christian friends and associates who are leaving the city to live in the country, try their hand at small-town agrarian life. Wendell Berry stuff. I think that’s the right start — not moving away from America, but moving into the places where America is at its best.

  • Art, you really think that abortion is only happening in our country because of some accident of bad judges?

    The policy was imposed by the appellate judiciary and has been maintained by the appellate judiciary against the wishes of all but about nine state legislatures. Two thirds of the female population who have been in their child bearing years since 1970 have not participated in this practice and (as Fr. Neuhaus put it), 70% of the population disapproves of abortion in 95% of the circumstances in which it takes place.

    The elected officials could have used the tools at their command to discipline the judiciary. They did not. There should have been a popular mobilization to do that and restore the status quo ante 1967. There has been to some extent, but it has been stymied by the fact that the culture of the bar is simply very different from that of the general public, and the appellate judiciary has retained a prestige it certainly does not merit.

    The legal regime in question is permissive. A great deal of crime has been committed as a consequence, but it makes little sense to refer to ‘the United States’ as a ‘force’ for ‘evil’ ‘in the world’. The evil occurs in social life generally. The political dimension of social life is implicated only because of the misfeasance of the judiciary. For all that, the United States Government has not promoted abortion abroad in the world except perhaps through intermittent funding of United Nations agencies up to no good. And, again, it makes little sense to complain of public policy in the United States (much less the United States as a polity or society) when the evil in question is a feature of social life in the entire Occident and much of the Far East as well.

  • I have a good many Christian friends and associates who are leaving the city to live in the country, try their hand at small-town agrarian life.

    Get real.

    In my part of the world, small towns and rural areas suffer very few violent crimes. One county I lived in had a population shy of 70,000 and a mean of about five robberies in a year. There has not been a homicide hearabouts since 1996. That is the advantage you have over the city. Otherwise, the degenerate aspects of the age are to be found here as anywhere.

    They do not publish birth notices in my local paper anymore. They did so as recently as a decade ago. There were certain conventions observed (e.g. placing the mother’s maiden name in parentheses) in these notices which told you bits of information about the families in question. You could tell from these conventions what share of births at the local hospitals were out of wedlock. In the catchments of our two small-town hospitals, the share was about 40%.

    As for agrarian life, forget it. One of the staff of Co-operative Extension at Cornell told me (again, over a decade ago) that there were fewer than 700 farmers in that county with 70,000 people in it. The displaced dairy farmer working in my office was pretty plain about it: the economics of agriculture have rendered it impossible for any but the most skilled and meticulous to make a living at it. It tore him up to sell his cows, but the milk business has very slim profit margins.

  • The Titanic metaphor is actually reasonably compelling, and a far better argument than the “one of the greatest forces for evil.” Hubris and blindness are indeed driving us to a precipice, as surely as J. Bruce Ismay made sure the jewel of the White Star Line was going at top speed.

    But that makes Ismay (and Smith, and Murdoch, et al) tragic figures, not inherently malevolent. We should look at the potential ruin of America the same way Augustine faced the ruin of Western Rome–as a tragedy, and an evil in itself.

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  • Joe interesting remark about Lila Rose. I have not heard that anywhere else and I think it deserves some further exploration. Kudos

  • Zach, I actually wrote a post about it a long time ago here. But now might be a good time to write a new one. Perhaps this evening.

  • “I have a good many Christian friends and associates who are leaving the city to live in the country…”

    My husband and I did that once, for about 3 years. It was very nice in some ways — we had fruit trees and I taught myself how to can fruit and vegetables.

    However, several things made it eventually unsustainable — namely, the fact that in order to pay the mortgage and property taxes and keep food on the table, at least one of us had to have a full time job that required a lengthy commute each day. This meant spending lots and lots of money on gas and car maintenance, not to mention on home maintenance and repair.

    As Art pointed out, very few people can make a living at farming anymore. Unless you are successfully self-employed and able to work from home, rural living these days can be more expensive in many ways than city living.

    Today I’d rather live in the city if for no other reason than I don’t have to be totally dependent on owning a car — I can walk or use public transportation if necessary. As for growing one’s own food — a valuable skill in a time of rising food prices — many cities now offer community gardens in which one can participate.

    It is true that rural areas tend to suffer less violent crime, but that doesn’t mean they are totally immune. For example, the worst recent mass murder in Central Illinois — in which a married couple and three of their children were killed and a fourth child seriously maimed — happened not in a major city but in a tiny rural village of less than 500 residents. Plus, when violent crime or other disasters (fires, car accidents, medical emergencies, etc.) do occur, it takes longer for first responders to arrive and longer to get to a hospital or other place of safety.

  • As for the main premise/question posed by this post: of course America is and has been a force for BOTH evil and good, just like any other country made up of fallen and sinful human beings.

    And where else are you going to go that’s better? The only truly pro-life and Catholic country I can think of is Malta, but since it’s a tiny island in the Mediterranean, good luck trying to emigrate there or find a place to live (unless you can somehow wheedle an appointment as ambassador, of course).

    As for political parties, I think there is a middle ground between insisting that Catholics should ALWAYS vote Democrat and insisting that they can NEVER vote Democrat under pain of mortal sin. I end up voting Republican about 95 percent of the time anyway due to the fact that most (not all) Democrats tend to be pro-abort. However, I don’t think this is an ideal situation and I hate to see the Church or the pro-life movement become totally beholden to one political party.

    I think we should love our country (and our state and community) the same way we love our families and friends: not because they are perfect, incorruptible, sinless or always right, but just because they are ours.

  • I do not agree with the sickening leftism and liberalism of Vox Nova or any of its comrades in the false gospel of social justice and peace at any price. I do believe that the United States was founded as a Christian Constitutional Republic and was once a good nation. But as long as we murder unborn babies as the right to choose, sanctify the filth of sodomy as equal rights, create and distribute pornography as freedom of speech, and commit general outright idolatry, then we can expect God’s wrath. In a way, the terror and horror of the Civil War was God’s wrath against the sin of slavery, and I predict that the liberals will never let go of abortion until that horrible event of five years in the 19th century repeats itself in the 21st. I do not want that to happen. I do not advocate that. But the satanic liberalism that Vox Nova ingratiates itself with leaves no other alternative except that the Lord Himself returns to Earth first. Jews in concentration camps in WWII were not freed till Germany had been devastated by the Allies. Unborn babies in their mothers’ wombs will not be protected till liberalism is likewise defeated in these United States. Let us hope and pray that happens WITHOUT the bloodshed of either liberals or conservatives. But history says otherwise, especially as long as godless liberals continue their demonic murderous spree against the unborn.

  • “As for political parties, I think there is a middle ground between insisting that Catholics should ALWAYS vote Democrat and insisting that they can NEVER vote Democrat under pain of mortal sin. I end up voting Republican about 95 percent of the time anyway due to the fact that most (not all) Democrats tend to be pro-abort. However, I don’t think this is an ideal situation and I hate to see the Church or the pro-life movement become totally beholden to one political party.

    I think we should love our country (and our state and community) the same way we love our families and friends: not because they are perfect, incorruptible, sinless or always right, but just because they are ours.”

    Perfect!

  • Nate, that policy [abortion] was imposed on our elected officials by our frigging judges.

    True, but it could not have been sustained for nearly 40 years without the acquiessence of a siginificant segment of the culture at large.

  • I was aware Katherine that MM is an Irish import. Considering that he endorsed Obama in a has-to-be-read-to-be-believed post on VN, I assumed that he had become a naturalized American citizen.

    So in a public forum, you falsely accused someone of election fraud (a felony) based on a wrong assumption* on your part. I missed the retraction and apology, but based on your inaccurate comments, I’m probably done reading what you write.

    * When you ‘assume’ you make an ..

  • Katherine I will miss your readership in much the same way I miss my most recent kidney stone. Go elsewhere in your attempt to create mountains out of molehills and avoid discussing the actual topics of the posts. Don’t get weary dragging those red herrings.

  • Its those red herrings which may one wonder about whether Vox Nova and their like are truly against abortion. When you spend so much effort to avoid denouncing their favorite political party, one is likely to think so.

    An example:

    http://vox-nova.com/2011/02/08/why-i-love-obama-abortion-and-hate-the-catholic-church%e2%80%94and-you-should-too/#comment-100027

  • It looks like my last post didn’t make it. Anyway, any thoughts on the Protect Life Act Donald? May make a post of it. Then we can see if VN will actually condemn some dems.

  • Retrieved your comment from the spam file Philip. If a comment has a link in it, Akismet usually thrusts it there. In the post you linked to Sam Rocha was being satirical, although much of what he wrote has been said seriously by various other Vox Nova contributors over the years. Vox Nova, with certain honorable examples, tends to be the home of individuals who would sooner eat ground glass than give aid or comfort to the conservatives or the Gop. If that means they have to studiously ignore abortion, they will. This does not apply to all Vox Nova contributors past or present, but that is the general tone of the blog.

    The Protect Life Act is a wonderful move by the GOP, as can be seen by the hysteria of leftist and pro-abort blogs in regard to it. Sam Rocha’s snide attitude when you asked him in the comment thread about the Act is typical of VN. If a Republican proposed it, best to go on the offense. Well done Philip! Rocha writes a satircal thread and you get him to go into protect the left mode, thereby undermining what he was attempting to establish by his post.

  • Thanks. I understand that Sam was being satirical though I was hoping he would be honest enough to admit that the Democrats are supporting evil in opposing the Protect Life Act. I guess I was misguided.

    As I said earlier, I think this is why some hold that VN is not “sufficiently” pro-life. I suspect for some there, one can cut out “sufficiently.”

  • I knew you realized it Philip and I salute the skill by which you undermined the satire. Really, someone should instruct Mr. Rocha that posts are wasted effort if the author disproves them in subsequent combox debate.

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  • So, Joe H., do you also oppose the use of undercover police?

  • Okay, so the questioning of Lila Rose, I get it, I guess. She didn’t break any laws, but was it ethical for her to go undercover (since that is what investigative journalists do?)
    Was it ethical for undercover journalists to expose widespread corruption in Chicago? Like in this story…http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,919328,00.html. So I guess the bigger question is “Is undercover investigative journalism ethical?” There is the ethical conundrum of whether the ends justify the means. If a journalist uncovers information that needs to be brought to the attention of the public, does that therefore justify the clandestine methods used to obtain that information? The concern is that the deceit on the part of the journalist sullies the critical information that is uncovered. Does a journalist dampen his credibility through the use of lies and chicanery?
    Journalism that relies on active deception and, more typically,passive’ misrepresentation to acquire information must satisfy at least the following three professional ethical requirements. First, the information pursued must be directly and strongly linked to a larger social purpose. Secondly, the public value of such information must clearly outweigh the injury caused by the deception and the privacy violation. Thirdly, undercover methods must not be resorted to where the information can be gathered by straightforward means. I would say Lila Rose met all of these requirements. The EVIL of Planned Parenthood far outweighs the deceit of her investigators.

Cody Alicea And His Flag Return to School

Monday, November 15, AD 2010

A follow up to Paul’s post here on the attempted banning of the American flag carried by Cody Alicea on his bike to honor his veteran grandfather.  Under enormous public pressure the school backed down.  Today, Cody Alicea went to school with his flag on his bike, but he didn’t go alone.  Hundreds of veterans riding motorcycles with American flags gave him an escort of honor.  As an immigrant friend of mine who served in the Marine Corps in World War I was fond of saying, “Some country this America!”.

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3 Responses to Cody Alicea And His Flag Return to School

Conservatives, Liberals and Patriotism

Tuesday, July 6, AD 2010

 

This is in the category of water is wet and fire burns.  Gallup has released the result of a poll which shows that conservatives embrace patriotism for the US far more than liberals:

“The increase in the overall percentage of Americans calling themselves “extremely patriotic” is driven largely by seniors, Republicans, and conservatives — all of whom are significantly more likely to say so than they were in 2005. Republicans’ relatively higher identification with the “extremely patriotic” label is particularly intriguing when one considers that Democrats are currently far more likely than Republicans to say they are satisfied with the way things are going in the country (41% vs. 7%, respectively). Still, the majority of Americans in each of these subgroups say they are “extremely” or “very” patriotic.”

Go here to view the poll.  Since 2005 the number of Republicans calling themselves extremely patriotic is up 17 points, the number of conservatives doing so is up 15 points, while the number of liberals claiming to be extremely patriotic is down 4 points. 

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13 Responses to Conservatives, Liberals and Patriotism

  • But … but … but … I thought all those conservatives were “seditious” traitors because of their refusal to embrace The One and his policies.

  • Please. This merely means that “conservatives” are pro-war. It’s a sad state of affairs in this country when patriotism is equated with the military.

    The Founding Fathers would be appalled at the state of today’s conservatism.

  • “This merely means that “conservatives” are pro-war.”

    The poll said nothing about foreign policy. However I will agree that conservatives do believe the country should defend itself, and that a defense policy aping the ostrich serves it poorly. Lack of support for a foreign war is of course not an excuse for being unpatriotic. Lincoln for example opposed the Mexican War, while always being a patriot.

    As to the Founding Fathers and modern conservatism, I do think that they would be appalled at many aspects of modern life, but I also think they would appreciate the patriotism of most conservatives. The Founding Fathers found much to criticize in their society, but their critiques were always written out of love for their country.

  • Pro-military is not the same thing as pro-war. In fact, the best defense against war is to be better prepared for it than your enemy. If our military, a legitimate function of the federal government, is kept strong, voluntary, moral, resolute and leaps and bounds above all others – we probably won’t have much occasion to go to war. When we do, it would be quick and decisive. Don’t confuse war-mongering Neo-Cons, which are actually leftists and not conservative, with conservatives.

    Additionally, patriotism isn’t limited to war and military. One of the virtues of the Knights of Columbus is Patriotism, do you really think the K of C is a war-promoting fraternity?

    This poll isn’t surprising at all. The virtue of Patriotism has been asleep as we have fallen for all the temptations of modernity. BHO is bringing the modern impulse to fulfillment, and that is causing a righteous reaction from authentic conservatives. It is pretty simple.

  • It looks like conservatives are more patriotic today than they were after 9/11, which demonstrates that the conservative brand of patriotism thrives better under Kenyan rule than during war.

  • “It looks like conservatives are more patriotic today than they were after 9/11, which demonstrates that the conservative brand of patriotism thrives better under Kenyan rule than during war.”

    I think the 9/11 reference would make more sense of “2005” read “2002.” But I do suspect that Kenyan rule can help stir US patriotism for the same reason that Kremlin rule helped stir Polish Catholicism.

  • To play devil’s advocate, here, the “extremely” thing might be a sticker. It’s often used to mean “irrational” rather than “to a high degree.”

    Even I wouldn’t self-ID as “extremely patriotic” because it sounds like a set-up for the famous “my mother, drunk or sober” junk, and “very patriotic” covers it just fine.

    They do have another chart showing prior poll results, but the one for 2002 is from January and was done with the Hartwood Institute, so it’s not quite apples to apples. (No, I don’t know that snow vs fireworks would change answers, nor do I know if the Hartwood folks just paid the phone guys, but I don’t know it won’t change the result, so it must be considered.)

  • It is pretty simple, the political debate in this country is supposed to be between Federalist (Conservatives) and anti-Federalist (Libertarians) – there is no room for Liberals (Collectivists). So when Collectivists achieve the levers of power and start pulling them to tear down the Constitution, not to mention trying to kill God and His babies, again! Then it follows that Conservatives and Libertarians will become more Patriotic in an effort to return the political debate to its proper balance. Since most Republicans are conservative, then it would make sense to see Republican numbers go up, so long as you aren’t speaking to Castle or Graham and their ilk.

    I could care less that BHO is Kenyan, or not – the real issue is that he doesn’t have the heart of an American, certainly not a Patriot and he would be more at home in Communist China, so he should go be their president – just please appoint someone other than Biden or Pelosi.

  • My priorities are God, family and country.

    Maybe liberals do not believe that patriotism is a virtue.

    basically, I believe liberals are evil and seem to hate not only our country but also despise the uses many of us make of our liberties and our property.

    I think liberals hate their mothers.

  • Fuji, are you really meaning to imply that being really really patriotic is “nation worship”?

    Seriously?

    Have you informed the Pope about the risk to his chaplains?

  • Fuji, take your neo-Confederate rantings elsewhere. You are banned from this blog.

  • 7% of Republicans are satisfied with the way things are going in this country?

    Are they soothsayers?

    I agree with Foxfier that “extremely” is a poor choice of adverb for a poll, because it has certain connotations—perhaps more so with younger people and their extreme sports and hula hoops and I-don’t-know-what—and I submit that “pretty darn” might be substituted next time around.

Happy Independence Day! (A Roundup)

Sunday, July 4, AD 2010

Happy Independence Day, folks! — Here is a roundup of some choice reads as we commemorate the birth of our nation:

Following are two books which I heartily recommend for some engaging historical reading of the American Revolution and our founding fathers.

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5 Responses to Happy Independence Day! (A Roundup)

Top Ten Patriotic Movies for the Fourth

Wednesday, June 30, AD 2010

Last year I listed here my top ten picks for movies about the America Revolution for the Fourth.  This year here is my list of patriotic movies for the Fourth.

10. National Treasure (2004)-Sure it’s cursed with a ridiculous plot involving the masons and a treasure, it is still a lot of fun and calls us back to the foundation document, the Declaration of Independence, that is the cornerstone of our Republic.

9. Hamburger Hill (1987)-Content advisory: very, very strong language in the video clip which may be viewed here.  All the Vietnam veterans I’ve mentioned it to have nothing but praise for this film which depicts the assault on Hill 937 by elements of the 101rst Division, May 10-20, 1969.  It is a fitting tribute to the valor of the American troops who served their country in an unpopular war a great deal better than their country served them.

8.    Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942)-James Cagney in perhaps the greatest film bio of them all, a salute to George M. Cohan, the legendary composer, playwright and patriot.

7.    The Alamo (1960)-“The Republic” scene from The Alamo, a film which was basically John Wayne’s love note to America.

6.    Gettysburg (1993)-The movie that I think comes the closest to conveying to us the passions of the Civil War.  You really can’t understand America unless you understand the Civil War.  As Shelby Foote, one of the greatest historians of the war, said:  “Any understanding of this nation has to be based, and I mean really based, on an understanding of the Civil War. I believe that firmly. It defined us. The Revolution did what it did. Our involvement in European wars, beginning with the First World War, did what it did. But the Civil War defined us as what we are and it opened us to being what we became, good and bad things. And it is very necessary, if you are going to understand the American character in the twentieth century, to learn about this enormous catastrophe of the mid-nineteenth century. It was the crossroads of our being, and it was a hell of a crossroads.”

5.    Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939)This movie came out at a time when fascism and communism seemed to be the wave of the future.  In the face of that dark reality, Mr. Smith is a brilliant paean to American democracy, and the idealism and devotion to the principles of the Founding Fathers that constantly battles against political corruption.

4.    Glory (1989)-The tale of the 54th Massachusetts in the Civil War, and a long overdue salute to the black troops who fought for the Union.  A superb film in every regard, and a model of  how history should be recreated on film.

3.    Wake Island (1942)-At the beginning of World War II the 1rst Marine Defense Battalion on Wake Island, gallantly supported by civilian workers, made an unforgettable stand against the Japanese.  This is the story of the American Thermopylae.

2.  Abe Lincoln in Illinois (1940)-Raymond Massey gives the performance of a life time as the greatest President this nation has ever had, save, perhaps, for George Washington.

1. 1776  (1972)-Singing and dancing Founding Fathers!  What’s not to love?  The film does a good job of depicting what a leap of faith the Declaration of Independence was.  For all the Founding Fathers knew, they could have all ended up dangling from British nooses, and cursed by their posterity.  They banished their fears and went boldly forward with their revolution, the most successful revolution in history, and which is still underway.

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15 Responses to Top Ten Patriotic Movies for the Fourth

  • “God gave us memory so that we could have roses in December.” J. M. Barries

  • That should be “Barrie.”

  • 1776? Yuck, I hated that movie.

    However, I do love the pick for “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington.”

  • Why is The Alamo on the list of patriotic movies? That battle was part of the Texas War for Independence. It has nothing to do with any part of the US outside of Texas. I agree there needs to be a John Wayne movie on the list but pick something patriotic to all 50 states like The Green Berets or the Sands of Iwo Jima.

  • “That battle was part of the Texas War for Independence. It has nothing to do with any part of the US outside of Texas.”

    “To The People of Texas and
    All Americans In The World —
    February 24, 1836

    Fellow citizens & compatriots —
    I am beseiged, by a thousand or more of the Mexicans under Santa Anna — I have sustained a continual Bombardment & cannonade for 24 hours & have not lost a man — The enemy has demanded a surrender at discretion, otherwise, the garrison are to be put to the sword, if the fort is taken — I have answered the demand with a cannon shot, & our flag still waves proudly from the walls — I shall never surrender or retreat. Then, I call on you in the name of Liberty, of patriotism, & every thing dear to the American character, to come to our aid, with all dispatch — The enemy is receiving reinforcements daily & will no doubt increase to three or four thousand in four or five days. If this call is neglected, I am determined to sustain myself as long as possible & die like a soldier who never forgets what is due to his own honor & that of his country —

    VICTORY OR DEATH

    William Barret Travis
    Lt. Col. Comdt.

    P.S. The Lord is on our side — When the enemy appeared in sight we had not three bushels of corn — We have since found in deserted houses 80 or 90 bushels & got into the walls 20 or 30 head of Beeves -“

  • That’s great that you can quote COL Travis, and he calls on American qualities, but so have many others around the world and the Alamo is still only relevant to Texan patriotism.

  • He called on all Americans in the world for aid. It is not only Texans who remember the Alamo.

  • Okay, I’m gonna have to send a little love towards 1776. I first saw it on a field trip in elementary school, and even then, the final scene where each man signs the Declaration and takes his place (ala Trumbull’s symbolic painting) while the Liberty Bell tolls sent chills up my spine. It really impressed on me the seriousness of the undertaking.

  • “while the Liberty Bell tolls sent chills up my spine.”

    I’m glad I’m not the only one who has that reaction!

  • I have posted what I believe to be the 13 best Patriotic movies for Independence day. (One for each of the thirteen original colonies.) Check it out at:
    http://www.joshuajmasters.com/blog/?p=208

  • How could you leave out The Patriot ?

  • I had it on my top ten revolutionary war films for the Fourth.

  • Meh. I’ll stick my neck out and say I don’t think The Patriot was a very good movie.

  • Have to agree with Darwin. Will risk any run-in with Mel.