6

Newspapers and Time

Hattip to Ed Driscoll at Instapundit.  Any work of entertainment becomes a cultural artifact that historians may use to analyze a point in history:

How quickly new technology can radically alter societies.  In three decades newspapers have gone from being an essential part of daily life, to being an industry on life support, kept alive by the inertia of a rapidly aging readership.  My father would pore over our local daily paper each day, and usually work the crossword puzzle and the cryptogram contained in each paper.  After I grew up I subscribed to The Chicago Tribune.  After the Trib endorsed Obama in 2008 I cancelled my subscription.  However, I realized at the time that I hadn’t been reading much of it in years, the paper usually arriving after I went to the law mines.  Almost all of my daily reading of the news was being done over the internet.  When my partner retired from the law mines in 2010, I immediately cancelled the firm’s subscription to the local regional paper that the firm subscribed to, and which I hadn’t been reading in several years.  I still get the local town paper, which is a weekly freebie, and where I place my legal notices, but it is usually my secretaries who bring any local story of note to my attention.  In some ways it is sad seeing an enterprise with such a long pedigree being one with Nineveh and Tyre, and in some ways I think most of the ink-stained wretches richly deserve their fate, but like it or not, we can do many things with time in this Vale of Tears, but we cannot freeze it.

9

Top-15 Most Popular Online Catholic News Organizations

 

Update @ 9:47 am U.S. Central Time on 5 September 2017:

This snapshot is taken on one day. This day represents the number of visits for a month.  So the previous 30 days on 17 August 2017 is the time period that SimilarWeb is collecting the data.

With the increasing frequency of bearing false witness in the form of news, otherwise known as ‘fake news’, we can rely on Catholic online sources to separate the weeds from the wheat.

In my job of searching for the best sources of news as the editor of Big Pulpit, I have gained somewhat of a comprehensive catalog of where to find faithful news and not so faithful news.

There are various measures of metrics that I use, but for this post, I will utilize the total visits in one day or what is called a snapshot in a moment of time.  In layman’s terms, on August 17, 2017, I looked at the most visited online Catholic news organizations for that date.

The definition of a ‘news organization’ is as follows: Any online Catholic news organization that creates a lot of posts covering a wide array of topics.

Yes, it’s my definition and yours may differ from mine, but the purpose of this post is to see where everyone stands, and it’s supposed to be fun and interesting.

The source of my analytics that I am using is called SimilarWeb.  This is my source and method of ranking websites.  The rankings are my own and I use them for entertainment purposes and for no other reason than for fun.  Some of these online Catholic news organizations I do not visit at all, others I visit frequently.

I’ve included all websites that fall within my wide definition of an online Catholic news organization.  What I have not included are what are called in the business ‘intelligent news aggregators’, such as Big Pulpit & New Advent, for example.  These types of news organizations do not create content, according to my definition, but aggregate and distribute content.

Without further delay, here are the Top-15 Most Popular Online Catholic News Organizations on the day of 17 August 2017 (the total amount of visitors for the previous 30 days tallied on 17 August 2017 is listed in brackets next to their name):

  1. Aleteia (5,190,000)
  2. Catholic News Agency (1,400,000)
  3. National Catholic Register (1,110,000)
  4. Crux (619,860)
  5. Catholic Herald (562,520)
  6. Catholic Culture, including Catholic World News (560,900)
  7. Church Militant, news only (526,240)
  8. National Catholic Reporter (468,310)
  9. OSV Newsweekly (275,400)
  10. The Tablet (191,580)
  11. U.S. Catholic (164,930)
  12. Catholic News Service (114,310)
  13. CommonWeal (107,350)
  14. The Remnant (100,180)
  15. The Wanderer (<12,000)

The Wanderer registers less than 12,000 visitors for that day, that is the cutoff that SimilarWeb uses to keep track of websites.  That is why it appears as ‘less than 12,000’.

Disclosure: I am the editor of Big Pulpit and also a contributor for the National Catholic Register, all views and posts are my own.

Disclaimer: The information provided in this post are solely for fun and entertainment.  The information provided has been compiled using SimilarWeb.

16

The Romance of the Press

It’s been interesting, though a bit odd, for me, watching the hand-wringing over the “death of the press” as some of the major newspapers struggle to figure out how to make their budgets work in a world in which fewer people read “dead tree” editions and advertisers can take advantage of more targeted advertising online and in specialty publications. There is, it seems, a level of reverence which many people seem to attach to “the press”, which does not seem well born out what it actually is.

Looked at historically and economically — newspapers exist as a delivery system for ads. They seek to provide stories that people want to read (whether “news”, human interest, comics, crosswords or recipes) in order to persuade people it’s worth parting with the artificially low newsstand or subscription price.

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