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Top-15 Most Popular Online Catholic News Organizations

 

Update @ 9:47 am U.S. Central Time on 5 September 2017:

This snapshot is taken on one day. This day represents the number of visits for a month.  So the previous 30 days on 17 August 2017 is the time period that SimilarWeb is collecting the data.

With the increasing frequency of bearing false witness in the form of news, otherwise known as ‘fake news’, we can rely on Catholic online sources to separate the weeds from the wheat.

In my job of searching for the best sources of news as the editor of Big Pulpit, I have gained somewhat of a comprehensive catalog of where to find faithful news and not so faithful news.

There are various measures of metrics that I use, but for this post, I will utilize the total visits in one day or what is called a snapshot in a moment of time.  In layman’s terms, on August 17, 2017, I looked at the most visited online Catholic news organizations for that date.

The definition of a ‘news organization’ is as follows: Any online Catholic news organization that creates a lot of posts covering a wide array of topics.

Yes, it’s my definition and yours may differ from mine, but the purpose of this post is to see where everyone stands, and it’s supposed to be fun and interesting.

The source of my analytics that I am using is called SimilarWeb.  This is my source and method of ranking websites.  The rankings are my own and I use them for entertainment purposes and for no other reason than for fun.  Some of these online Catholic news organizations I do not visit at all, others I visit frequently.

I’ve included all websites that fall within my wide definition of an online Catholic news organization.  What I have not included are what are called in the business ‘intelligent news aggregators’, such as Big Pulpit & New Advent, for example.  These types of news organizations do not create content, according to my definition, but aggregate and distribute content.

Without further delay, here are the Top-15 Most Popular Online Catholic News Organizations on the day of 17 August 2017 (the total amount of visitors for the previous 30 days tallied on 17 August 2017 is listed in brackets next to their name):

  1. Aleteia (5,190,000)
  2. Catholic News Agency (1,400,000)
  3. National Catholic Register (1,110,000)
  4. Crux (619,860)
  5. Catholic Herald (562,520)
  6. Catholic Culture, including Catholic World News (560,900)
  7. Church Militant, news only (526,240)
  8. National Catholic Reporter (468,310)
  9. OSV Newsweekly (275,400)
  10. The Tablet (191,580)
  11. U.S. Catholic (164,930)
  12. Catholic News Service (114,310)
  13. CommonWeal (107,350)
  14. The Remnant (100,180)
  15. The Wanderer (<12,000)

The Wanderer registers less than 12,000 visitors for that day, that is the cutoff that SimilarWeb uses to keep track of websites.  That is why it appears as ‘less than 12,000’.

Disclosure: I am the editor of Big Pulpit and also a contributor for the National Catholic Register, all views and posts are my own.

Disclaimer: The information provided in this post are solely for fun and entertainment.  The information provided has been compiled using SimilarWeb.

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I Really Hate This Part…

If I’ve seemed a bit reclusive on all the recent fuss over the health care bill, town hall meetings, etc., it’s because the debate over the current reform package has now entered the phase of American politics that I really don’t like. There’s an early stage in which ideas are discussed and bills are drafted. People try to put coallitions together, compromises are discussed, and various groups push their policy recommendations. That’s the realm I find interesting, and in my small corner of the blogsphere, I enjoy participating, in a strictly informal fashion, in the debate.

But then there’s a point when an actual bill (or bills) are on the table, and the democratic melee is let loose. Over the last week I’ve been reading Alessandro Barbero’s The Battle: A New History of Waterloo, and in light of that it strikes me that there’s a certain Napoleonic-battle aspect to all this. A month or two ago we were staring at maps and discussing the merits of different formations, but now everything is shrouded in smoke while innumerable combatants in this democratic struggle (most of whom, on both sides, honestly have a fairly rudimentary understanding of the overall debate) slug it out until we find out which side will hold the field and which will break and run.

In a democratic republic, this is a necessary part of our political process. Continue Reading