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Saint Irenaeus on Epiphany

 

 

 

Then again Matthew, when speaking of the angel, says, The angel of the Lord appeared to Joseph in sleep. Matthew 1:20 Of what Lord he does himself interpret: That it may be fulfilled which was spoken of the Lord by the prophet, Out of Egypt have I called my son. Matthew 2:15 Behold, a virgin shall conceive, and shall bring forth a son, and they shall call his name Emmanuel; which is, being interpreted, God with us. Matthew 1:23 David likewise speaks of Him who, from the virgin, is Emmanuel: Turn not away the face of Your anointed. The Lord has sworn a truth to David, and will not turn from him. Of the fruit of your body will I set upon your seat. And again: In Judea is God known; His place has been made in peace, and His dwelling in Zion. Therefore there is one and the same God, who was proclaimed by the prophets and announced by the Gospel; and His Son, who was of the fruit of David’s body, that is, of the virgin of [the house of] David, and Emmanuel; whose star also Balaam thus prophesied: There shall come a star out of Jacob, and a leader shall rise in Israel. Numbers 24:17 But Matthew says that the Magi, coming from the east, exclaimed For we have seen His star in the east, and have come to worship Him; Matthew 2:2 and that, having been led by the star into the house of Jacob to Emmanuel, they showed, by these gifts which they offered, who it was that was worshipped; myrrh, because it was He who should die and be buried for the mortal human race; gold, because He was a King, of whose kingdom is no end; Luke 1:33 and frankincense, because He was God, who also was made known in Judea, and was declared to those who sought Him not.

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Traditional Catholics as Herod

 

We can always depend upon our Pope to disappoint.  He uses the Feast of Epiphany to lash out at traditional Catholics:

 

“Longing for God draws us out of our iron-clad isolation, which makes us think that nothing can change. Longing for God shatters our dreary routines and impels us to make the changes we want and need. Longing for God has its roots in the past yet does not remain there: it reaches out to the future. Believers who feel this longing are led by faith to seek God, as the Magi did, in the most distant corners of history, for they know that there the Lord awaits them. They go to the peripheries, to the frontiers, to places not yet evangelized, to encounter their Lord. Nor do they do this out of a sense of superiority, but rather as beggars who cannot ignore the eyes of those who for whom the Good News is still uncharted territory.

“An entirely different attitude reigned in the palace of Herod, a short distance from Bethlehem, where no one realized what was taking place. As the Magi made their way, Jerusalem slept. It slept in collusion with a Herod who, rather than seeking, also slept. He slept, anesthetized by a cauterized conscience. He was bewildered, afraid. It is the bewilderment which, when faced with the newness that revolutionizes history, closes in on itself and its own achievements, its knowledge, its successes. The bewilderment of one who sits atop his wealth yet cannot see beyond it. The bewilderment lodged in the hearts of those who want to control everything and everyone. The bewilderment of those immersed in the culture of winning at any cost, in that culture where there is only room for “winners”, whatever the price. A bewilderment born of fear and foreboding before anything that challenges us, calls into question our certainties and our truths, our ways of clinging to the world and this life. Continue Reading