This One’s For You, Chris

Thursday, October 4, AD 2012

One of the more amusing episodes of the post-debate media coverage was Chris Matthew’s on-air meltdown, in which he shouts to his fellow MSNBC panelists “where was Obama tonight!?” and “he [Romney] was WINNING!” among (many) other things. It was priceless:

It’s hard to believe it was only four years ago that Matthews, to his everlasting shame, announced that Obama sent a thrill up his leg.

It would appear, then, that:

It’s more than the title, too. I mean, it’s clear that Obama has done Chris quite wrong, and that he will be sorry someday – unless he heeds Matthew’s warning and starts taking cues on how to debate from him and his colleagues (pray that Obama actually does it).

In all seriousness, Romney was the clear winner of the debate. But this was really nothing compared to the massacre that is going to take place on October 11. I’ll be watching with pizza and imported beer!

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5 Responses to This One’s For You, Chris

  • I’ll be watching with pizza and imported beer!”

    Agreed Bonchamps. I’ve got my frien booked for the show, at his place.
    But I’m not into imported beer, unless its German. We do very well thankyou, with a bottle of Lambs dark rum and a bottle of coke – not the whole bottle of course, but a couple of shots each.

    Unless, of course, uncle Joe gives such a good performance, we might be nudged into having one or two more.

    Sock it to him, Paul Ryan 🙂

  • It’s almost as if years of cognitive dissonance from propping up a hollow world-view have reached critical mass for both Obama and Chris and they are just plain tired.

  • There were times in the debate that Obama’s expressions suggested that he agreed with the critiques Romney leveled. It seemed particularly noticable when Romney fit the staggering numbers of unemployment and the waste of political capital without attending to the economy.

    I wonder if the President’s conscience pricks him. I pray that that is so.

  • I guess that is as close to an adult temper tantrum as you will see. It reminds me of how 2 year old daughter behaves after telling her she cannot have a cookie before dinner.

  • Winning!

    In demeanor and phrasing, Chris reminded me of Charlie Sheen. Not the best role model for a political analyst.

Some In Mainstream Media In Full Anti-Catholic Meltdown Mode

Thursday, February 23, AD 2012

Some in the mainstream media are so angry about the existence of faithful Catholics that they can’t help themselves in becoming unhinged. I will reference the main points, but suffice to say that I could write a book on the subject. These latest quotes have caused me to scramble to get information to my editor so as to include at least some of this in my upcoming book; The Tide Continues To Turn Toward Catholicism, a follow up to my first book.  For starters it seems some in mainstream media are so ignorant of religion that even though 90% of Americans belong to some form of Christianity, Judaism and Islam, which all believe that evil is manifested through a figure known as Satan, the media still finds it in their power to mock anyone who thinks evil exists. Some in the media seemed to take glee in pouncing on Catholic and former Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum. He was called a kook, a nut, deranged, a mullah and an ayatollah, not by nameless posters on leftwing blogs but named writers in serious newspapers.

Leading the charge was that maven of militant secularism and angry people everywhere Maureen Dowd. Here are some of the spoiled nuggets from her dung heap. She calls Santorum a “mullah” who wants to take, “women back to the caves.” She goes on to deride anyone who actually believes in the teachings of the Catholicism that she once practiced.

Never one to miss a chance at apostasy and heresy; Chris Matthews entered the fray with both of his tingling legs.   Matthews claimed the reason the Catholic Church is growing is because homophobic converts are coming into the Church. It would appear that Mr. Matthews is off his meds. Has anyone ever informed mister leg tingler that groups like Courage; the Apostolate run by those who are same sex attracted, is a rapidly growing organization with men and women from all walks of life? They feel the comfort and assurance of living in God’s chaste plan for their lives. The New York Times of all papers did a favorable story on Eve Tushnet, a popular Catholic writer who has ties to the group. She is a successful woman and an Ivy League grad. Are these militant secularists going to claim that she is homophobic?

David Gergen and Donna Brazile (who is Catholic) didn’t take any pot shots at Catholics per see but did point out that liberal feminist organizations didn’t seem smitten with any of the GOP candidates, because they kept talking about religious liberty instead of the rights of birth control? David Gergen even said it with a straight face, which should really frost Rush Limbaugh who has dubbed the Washington establishmentarian; David Rodham Gergen. As much as they refer to the New York Times, they somehow missed Ross Douthat’s op-ed piece on the growth of Natural Family Planning and the number of women who help teach this non birth control view of family planning across the country and world.

The coup de grace of hate came from David Waldman who writes for a number of publications. This little nugget would make the Know Nothing Party of the 1840s smile. I would rather not give him the pleasure of repeating such delusional hatred; if you want to read his screed click here.   UPDATE In a Lisa Miller Washington Post article just out; Ms. Miller not only mocks Catholics but calls bishops “zealots” three times in her article.

If the Catholic Church is so irrelevant why would the likes of Dowd, Matthews and Waldman froth at the mouth at her beliefs? The simple answer is the Catholic Church is growing while their favorite liberal religious bodies are not only dying on the vine, but shriveling in a complete statistical freefall. Catholics and Evangelicals continue to increase in numbers which drive these mouthpieces of militant secularism nuts.

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22 Responses to Some In Mainstream Media In Full Anti-Catholic Meltdown Mode

  • “22 Blessed are you when men hate you, when they exclude you and insult you and reject your name as evil, because of the Son of Man. 23 Rejoice in that day and leap for joy, because great is your reward in heaven. For that is how their fathers treated the prophets.” St. Luke

    Love them with Christian charity. Instruct them. Admonish them. Counsel them. For as long as they live, and we pray and set good examples through good works and prayer, they may come to a better “mind.”

    They are infallibly ignorant. We will annoy them!

  • I think this might be more ignorance of the culpable variety. Though their consciences are so scarred by their support for abortion and their reduction of Catholic social teaching to the perverse “social justice” variety that their culpability is likely lessened.

    Though culpable they remain. Their souls are at risk and we should weep for them.

    Fast and pray.

  • Iam one of the faithful but I also am becoming a Militant Catholic tired of the Bidens Pelosi,, Sebilius, Mathews,Kerry, and any other that publicly denounces the teachings of our faith.Heres a thought find another Religion one moe to your liking if you dont like the churches teachings LEAVE by the way why are they not EXCOMMUNICATED!

  • No, no, no, you’re not going to get me this time, Dave! I’ve fallen for the “link to a Maureen Dowd column” virus before. One click, and it fills your computer screen with gibberish.

  • Phillip,

    I think you are correct.

    They may be like the seeds that fell among thorn bushes. They hear the Gospel, but love of power, riches and/or the state chokes the Word. They do not bear fruit. Also, they may like be weeds the enemy sowed among wheat. (Matthew 13: 18 – 30; Mark 4: 13 – 20; Luke 8: 11 – 15)

    Their appropriate Bishops need to ex-communicate such persons out of charity to try to save their souls.

    I looked it up. Ex-communication is a reproach more than a punishment. The rite concludes with, “We exclude him from the bosom of our Holy Mother the Church and we judge him condemned to eternal fire with Satan and his angels and all the reprobate, so long as he will not burst the fetters of the demon, do penance and satisfy the Church.” The priest: Closes the book. Rings a bell – symbolizes the toll of death. Extinguishes the candle – symbolizes the removal from the sight of God.

    OTOH, interdict is a punishment.

    They need prayers. Sadly, I have many more needful of prayers.

    Pinky, I stopped following links after having to replace a lap top and a flat-screen TV.

  • Ann Coulter’s latest column, entitled “What’s Their Problem With Romney?”, disparages the other candidates including the “crusading Catholic who can’t seem to move the conversation past contraception”.

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  • “mainstream media” (sic)

    The DLEMM – Dominant Liberal Establishment Mass Media – does not reflect mainstream thought. Referring to the DLEMM as “mainstream” is inaccurate and a mistake. Liberals are not mainstream.

  • Here’ a bit from Nancy Pelosi talking about how the Church should not complain about the mandate as there has been no enforcement by the Church of the ban on contraception. There is a logic to her heresy. Let this awaken the bishops from their long slumber.

    http://cnsnews.com/news/article/pelosi-catholic-church-has-not-enforced-its-teaching-contraception

  • May I add my voice: I too am tired of Catholic bashing! I heard that some time ago in Canada there was a porn shop that neighbors objected to. Many of them put religious medals inside the cracks of the brick walls, and after some time the building burnt down by no apparent reason. My tought would be to send green scapulers and/or miraculous medals to all who hate the Catholic Faith with praying on our part to change their ways. I have done something simular to that in leaving such materials on job sites. May our Great Nation be filled with coversions to our Great Faith…..

  • Grandpa Dave, I like your ideas. Also Dave Hartline, great post! You are always so on target.

  • T. Shaw,
    “22 Blessed are you when men hate you, when they exclude you and insult you and reject your name as evil, because of the Son of Man. 23 Rejoice in that day and leap for joy, because great is your reward in heaven. For that is how their fathers treated the prophets.” St. Luke
    “…and reject your name as evil, because of the Son of Man.” I believe Jesus bent down and wrote the name of the Pharisees trying to stone Magdalene. A person’s name is the BEST thing and the WORST thing anybody can say about a person. Congress tried to “BORK” Clarence Thomas. Obamacare. It may be that Obamacare is the best thing anybody can say about Obama’s presidency and that Obama’s constitutency has to go to hell because of the way Obama practices the corporal and spiritual works of mercy. It has occurred to me that the reason that the Media oppresses the Catholic Church with such vitriol, slander and lies, is simply because the administration, our culture, Obama and Pelosi and the like, have done and are doing nothing good to speak of. “infallible ignorance” is not an oxymoron, but the path of Obama’s adminstration. The picture of Dorian Gray is hanging in the White House, and the Emporer’s New Clothes are being advertized in the Media.

  • My friends prayer is most needed after reading other sites (and the comments left) who linked to this story. Those sites are hardly in our corner and though they mock us, if you read between the lines the anger is really vented at God Himself. Why you might ask? Sadly, arrogance, vanity, and pride makes some think they know better than God. We must never back down from them, but we must also never stop praying for them!

  • Dave, you are bang-on, as always.

    But this awkward fact remains — many Catholics and other Christians voted for the present administration, despite their then-obvious hatred of the faith, of this nation, and of civilized discourse. Why, why, why?

  • “many Catholics and other Christians voted for the present administration, despite their then-obvious hatred of the faith, of this nation, and of civilized discourse. Why, why, why?”

    Well, in 2008 the current administration-to-be’s “obvious” hatred of all things good may have been obvious to committed Catholics, evangelicals, and conservatives who frequent blogs like this and make it a point to judge all candidates by their record on moral issues. However, it was NOT so obvious to people outside of our traditional/conservative circles who had to rely upon the mainstream media for most of what they knew. We cannot assume that what is obvious to us is obvious to everyone else.

    That said, I think THIS time around the situation is much more obvious to everyone. When EVERY single U.S. bishop speaks out against the HHS mandate and a long procession of noted evangelical Protestants joins the effort, it’s pretty hard to ignore that. Plus there is an actual record of what Obama has done as an executive (rather than a legislator) to point to.

    I will concede that it MIGHT have been possible for a sincere (but not conservative) Catholic who wasn’t involved in the pro-life movement to persuade themselves in 2008 that voting for Obama (with McCain as the alternative) wouldn’t be so bad. I DO NOT think they have that excuse this time around.

  • Mack thanks for the kind words, and yes too many of the faithful voted and are still smitten with the Left’s agenda. It is as old as time itself, the belief that you can outsmart God and common sense and somehow everything will turn out just fine. It kinda reminds of two drunks at a party upset that anyone thinks they are drunk. By their strong and slurring protestations they think they can prove their sobriety. However, everyone knows the truth. Sadly, we have a lot of drunks at the party right now. However, the dawn is fast approaching and so is the hangover!

  • Elaine, just saw your post. Good point!

  • If something similar to the Q’ran burning fiasco aand concomitant murders of four US service members had occurred in 2004, it would have been 24/7 MSM shrieking “Bush must go!”

    In 2012, it’s crickets . . .

  • I see by the comments here that mutual masturbation is not considered a sin among the faithful.

  • You know I find this rather fascinating that we have so many non believers who read this site. It reminds me of all those converted atheists and agnostics who said there was a strange pull that kept them coming to religious sites. Unbeknownst to them, it was their conscience which they had tried to erase but God kept bringing up. I believe it was Mark Shea who said something to the effect that; if these atheists thought we believed in nothing why would they care? They don’t make fun of pagans worshipping Thor or Isis; yet they have to mock us with little juvenile comments that they learned in 8th grade. Very telling.

  • It is hard to spell atheist Dave without l-o-s-e-r. Most atheists are very angry people and troll atheists tend to be among the angriest of a very bitter group. A truly pathetic way to live.

A warped sense of community

Friday, October 15, AD 2010

Well it looks like Cynthia Tucker has been beaten out for the most obtuse observation of the past 24 hours.  Let’s hear from Chris Mathews, who decided to turn a great story about survival into a partisan political point.

Down 2,000 feet in the ground, a group of 33 men not only survived for 69 days but prevailed. What a story of human faith, hope, charity and yes, community. I know that last word drives people on the right crazy: community.

Theirs is the popular notion that it`s every man for himself. Grab what you can, screw the masses, cash out of the government, go it alone — the whole cowboy catechism.

But how would those miners have survived, the 33 of them, and their loved ones living above if they`d behave like that with the attitude of every man for himself. This is above all, and deep down they`re in the mine about being in all there together. It`s about mutual reliance and relying on others. Not just to do their jobs, but to come through in the clutch.

Not only is this a sophomoric and shameful bit of analysis, but it further proves the point that great swathes of the left fundamentally do not understand what is meant by “community.”

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20 Responses to A warped sense of community

  • Matthews is the most moronic talking head on tv, but one:

  • I just have to share this. Remember when Obama made his candidacy announcement in Springfield in 2007? I was there covering it as a stringer for a newspaper I used to work for. Man was it cold that day….and that seems like a gazillion years ago now but I digress.

    The following incident was something I did not personally see happen, but I read about it later on another blog.

    Chris Matthews was there all set up to do his “Hardball” show live, in a small tent with electric heaters going full blast. He was all bundled up, of course, and wearing a big, fat pair of hunting socks with a red stripe at the top. A passer by called out to him, in a good-natured fashion, “Hey Chris, nice socks!” His reply: “Go (bleep) yourself”!

  • What a great product of Catholic education Chris Matthews is! He has dropped the F-Bomb live on television before Elaine:

    http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1780729/posts

  • Are we offtopic by nailing mattew’s own faults than talking about the issue of community are we? I will admit this guy along with Michael Moore are charlatans much like from the right rush limbaugh and Sean Hannity
    Anyway I would like to ask some questions from a ‘liberal’ perspective. I think we have the same ideas about community and I do agree we have lost many of our views of the world. What did you mean by

    “It is in fact progressivism that has driven a stake into the concept of community by building metaphorical walls between neighbors.”

    I will take this one piece at the time. I speak to my neighbors with no problem. Fact is once my dog ran off and I had no time because I was going to be late for work I could not call in for that my neighbor told me if they would find her they would put her in my back yard. To my surprise (not really) i got back and there she was. I am liberal but I am just like you not some monster that locks my doors and does not talk to people. Maybe i am missing what you are trying to say here I will continue.

    ” Not only do meddlesome social welfare programs enervate the drive towards personal charity, but liberal attitudes about social mores erect further barriers. In an age when each person gets to establish his own set of social values, communities drift further apart. ”

    I have been a catholic my whole life I would like to hear what you means by this. Who defines these social values if not by people? The church? The Government? I think this is were we start parting ways a little as well. But maybe I am more conservative then most. I believe that states(or local communities) should determine some of these social issues not any fundamentalist group from right or left. I see the pro-gay movement and anti-gay movement, but are our laws based on this? In many ways yes I would say that most people don’t care unless to really effects them directly. So why are we making some laws that are not hurting society. But I guess that is how we define that too. We are going to strung up on DEFINING a great example is clinton definition on sex. I think both sides need to look at this problem in depth.

    “Those that seek to protect their children from a rancid culture are forced to withdraw into their own cocoons.”

    I think you can talk about some of these radical issues like little girls looking like 30 yr old and having sex … etc .. You will find most people on the left outraged much as yourself. Yet you will disagree we need more regulation if your a true hawk right person. Yet we can disagree with the financial issues and regulation, but I hope you can agree we need more regulation on this subject. Much are the parents fault in my experience as a substitute teacher parents from both right and left will allow there kids come into school dressed a mini- pimps and whores. I believe we need schools to start enforcing better dress codes ad sending them home. I also believe if one crazy parent disagrees o well maybe we should setup some kind of mini elections to make that one crazy parent not able to get their way. Get out of your cocoons and participate in government and your community!!

    Here is a side story that makes me sad: I was doing pre-cana with my future wife and the people had us do this back to back thing. One question they asked was “Helping my community is important to us”. We both raised our hands ( win for our relationship) . We look around and saw only about 25% of the couples with hands raised. I expected more, but that is why I believe in taxes on to give to everyone evenly because 75% of people based on this experience will not give back to society so taxes is the only way to guarantee some resources are given back to society. If it was 75% to 25% i would say maybe you republicans are right by having less taxes for everyone.

    ” Now obviously there are communities within these communities where people who have shared values can congregate – be it Church or some other organization – but we’ve become more polarized as the gulf in moral values expands.”

    Its sad, but i do agree with this point a little. I see my future family in law they are very polarized. My future wife grew up in a home with no focus on god and my fiancee told me that she feels that church makes her feel she has more a foundation because her parents seem to only care for material possessions. We need some of these values back in our society. But as educated Catholics we know that our christian brothers and sisters believe in the same values maybe not same dogma. But this country is not only made of Christians, but Hindu, Muslim, Buddhists, etc… I think many religions have very much the same ideals and we should be a country of god. Yet it seems the atheists have been winning. We could have prayer still in classrooms but maybe it should be to a general god not Jesus, or Shiva … I think our failing is we have become very polarized and not look at things in a middle ground. Yet Americans rather have nothing than something. Either prayer that is only centered on christian beliefs or nothing. This attitude is what is making things more polarized and I hope to see some new movement pushing us back to where we were in the 50s in this country were left and right can find some common ground . I hope that is not too late.

  • At this point Chris Matthews should just be chained, strait-jacketed, and shuttled around the country in a train car with steel bars as a circus exhibit of freakish lunacy, tingling leg and all.

  • “We look around and saw only about 25% of the couples with hands raised. I expected more, but that is why I believe in taxes on to give to everyone evenly because 75% of people based on this experience will not give back to society so taxes is the only way to guarantee some resources are given back to society. If it was 75% to 25% i would say maybe you republicans are right by having less taxes for everyone.”

    You could just as easily say that nobody feels any inclination to give back to their community because they know the government will forcibly take their money and do it for them.

    It’s almost as if, by constantly telling upper-to-middle-class wage-earners that they are greedy and selfish for not wanting their job salaries confiscated to pay for things like bank bailouts and abortion clinics, they give up and actually start acting that way.

    Just a theory.

  • “Are we off topic by nailing matthew’s own faults than talking about the issue of community”

    Yes, we are, and I gotta plead guilty to helping steer the thread off topic.

    I agree, Alex, sometimes we get so caught up in this liberal-conservative, red state-blue state thing that we forget to look at the real people behind it. It seems to be an occupational hazard for people who have a strong interest in politics and social issues (and I use the term “social issues” here in a very broad sense — everything having to do with society, not “just” abortion and gay marriage, though they are important)

    I personally do not know anyone who is either totally 100 percent liberal or totally 100 percent conservative. The question is where to set the balance between these two extremes.

    On a scale of 0 to 100, where 0 is total anarchy and 100 is an ironclad communist police state with absolutely no freedom at all, I’m guessing that a hardcore objectivist/libertarian would set the dial around 20; most conservatives would set it between 30 and 50; liberals would set it between 50 and 75; socialists would dial it up to about 80; and hardcore communists like the Chinese and North Koreans have it cranked up to about 95. So the majority of the debate is really taking place in about the 30 to 75 range. Again, these are just rough guesses on my part, but you get the drift.

  • “He has dropped the F-Bomb live on television before”

    I should clarify that the incident I was referring to did NOT take place on the air, but while he was getting ready to go on the air. Just wanted to clear that up.

  • “I personally do not know anyone who is either totally 100 percent liberal or totally 100 percent conservative. The question is where to set the balance between these two extremes.

    On a scale of 0 to 100, where 0 is total anarchy and 100 is an ironclad communist police state with absolutely no freedom at all, I’m guessing that a hardcore objectivist/libertarian would set the dial around 20; most conservatives would set it between 30 and 50; liberals would set it between 50 and 75; socialists would dial it up to about 80; and hardcore communists like the Chinese and North Koreans have it cranked up to about 95. So the majority of the debate is really taking place in about the 30 to 75 range. Again, these are just rough guesses on my part, but you get the drift.”

    This is a great point, and it also helps explain the growing chasm between “elites” in America and those without the benefit of university educations.

    I have attended roughly five different colleges in the last seven years, from community colleges to an Ivy-league university, and political science seems to be discussed among the college-educated solely in terms of academic abstractions such as “left, right, conservative, liberal, capitalist, communist” all of which are useful terminology but none of which exist purely, or have ever existed, or could possibly exist, in the actual state of reality.

    I always hear about the “growing polarization” in American politics, but the most polarization I see is between the political class which uses these terms merely as rhetorical weapons to fight over power, and the average workers and salary-earners who recognize the real issues that undergird the rhetoric.

    For example, the Bush family and the Clinton family might genuinely hate each other, and might be convinced that they have serious ideological differences based on the topics they chose for their respective senior theses at Yale or Harvard, but the American people aren’t seeing the difference anymore. To quote the man talking about the Falkland Islands war: “It’s like two bald men fighting over a comb.” And voters are sick of it. That is where the “polarization” is occurring.

  • I’ll try to be as comprehensive as I can in response to you, Alex.

    First of all, one of the problems with political theory is that it is all very generalized stuff. When I talk about the Hobbesian tendencies in society I am trying to get to an overall trend. Are left-wing individuals themselves social misfits who hate others? Most are not (Rousseau indeed was), and indeed most of my neighbors are on the opposite side of the political spectrum from me, and are all quite nice. But what I see is that the overall trend in leftist policies tends to diminish the importance of these little platoons.

    On the point about social mores, a couple of things. Here it is important to distinguish between secular leftists and religious leftists, and on these sorts of issues there might be more division on the left. Also, contrary to my previous point, I am not really talking about policies, per se. What I am referring here is a cultural clash that is beyond the political sphere. We live in an age of moral relativism where a certain segment of society seems to think that it’s pretty much anything goes out there in the wider world. There are large swaths of society that seem to think that it’s no big deal to promote teen sexuality, for instance. How can society properly function when a large segment of it think traditional sexual mores are outmoded, and in fact when those who do have a less “liberal” outlook are outright mocked?

    Yet you will disagree we need more regulation if your a true hawk right person.

    Again, I am not talking about regulations or policies in this instance.

    As for the tax issue, I think Linus made a good point. Now, I’m not saying we have to get rid of all government assistance, but the more we rely on government to be this sort of safety net, the more it discourages others from becoming more personally involved.

    I think our failing is we have become very polarized and not look at things in a middle ground.

    Well, yes and no. First of all, there’s always been polarization. We always harken back to some mythical time when everybody compromised and got along swell. This never happened. Ever. It’s actually in the foundational design (read Federalist 10) to have disagreement. Modern forms of communication make that disagreement seem more virulent than it once was – and perhaps it is to some degree – but it’s really not much different now as back then.

    Also, I think this kind of sentiment, while nice, glosses over the fact that there are fundamentally different points of view, and they are not reconcilable. I’d rather not have my kids pray in school than pray to a generic deity that isn’t the triune God. These are not things we can compromise about.

  • Oh, and it’s certainly no diversion to mock Chris Matthews. All that philosophy mumbo jumbo was just an excuse to point out how stupid he really is. 😉

  • @Elaine
    You make great points. Yet I think our politics are starting to sound a lot like post WWI Germany that is what makes me scared.

    @Paul
    “What I am referring here is a cultural clash that is beyond the political sphere. We live in an age of moral relativism where a certain segment of society seems to think that it’s pretty much anything goes out there in the wider world. There are large swaths of society that seem to think that it’s no big deal to promote teen sexuality, for instance. ”

    I agree with this statement because I do see this from my fiancee’s mother, but I think this group of people are much smaller than you think. I think many of those who are left or right will be on common ground than some of these fundamentalists on either side. I think if we had more people participating on both sides in both government and community we would not be where we are today. As I do think it feels that these 1-5% of the people that pay into the shit of moral realism are taking over from the left. As well as the 1-5% of these too big to fail companies have taken over the republicans and some democrats.

    “Also, I think this kind of sentiment, while nice, glosses over the fact that there are fundamentally different points of view, and they are not reconcilable. I’d rather not have my kids pray in school than pray to a generic deity that isn’t the triune God. These are not things we can compromise about.”

    Why I agree yet disagree with this point. I think that prayer is needed. I don’t want to push my views on others, but I think that if lead we can have multi-disciplinary view. If our pope can meet other religious leaders and be civil why can’t we teach more tolerance. I have seen some bishops go to Buddhist meditation classes. We can disagree on praying to Jesus but i think we all see that prayer is what is needed. Why do we have to disagree on this point. If your child is praying to Jesus and the next kid is praying to Shiva i see that as a win. The next step from this is those who are not Christians opening up dialog with us and that is where we can start on a common ground to do as Jesus and spread truth, but i feel that only happened from starting in tolerant position not a fundamentalist view. Jesus did not compromise on his values and god he did show tolerance and patience. All that intolerance has given us is more wars and more polarization.

    @linus

    “For example, the Bush family and the Clinton family might genuinely hate each other, and might be convinced that they have serious ideological differences based on the topics they chose for their respective senior theses at Yale or Harvard, but the American people aren’t seeing the difference anymore. To quote the man talking about the Falkland Islands war: “It’s like two bald men fighting over a comb.” And voters are sick of it. That is where the “polarization” is occurring.”

    As I agree very much with this. Both sides that i think is even more amusing is they call left “elite”, but most on the right are “elite” as well. It is not about education this term has been thrown around since the beginning and guess what the founders of this country was “elite” all of them. I think we all need to start participating because the people that are the real “elites” are going to take over and we may see our freedoms continue to leave. Bush gave us the patriot act, and yet it still there. Obama has left that law in place and from the sounds of if we are having secret trails and people disappearing. I am afraid if it continues we will be much like nazi germany soon. I think we all both right and left need to start waking up or we may lose this type forum to agree to disagree. Yet how do we get people to participate more that seems to be a problem we have had for over a century in this country.

  • “You could just as easily say that nobody feels any inclination to give back to their community because they know the government will forcibly take their money and do it for them.”
    Linus,
    I lived for several years in that social safety-netted paradise, Europe, and came away with the distinct impression that charity was not a priority there. Tax rates are high and the attitudes that “the government takes care of that,” and “given what I’m contributing, I’m taking full advantage of my entitlements” are pervasive. I believe it’s been pointed out before that the bulk of contributions in the wake of major disasters usually come from private charities in the U.S.

    “We always harken back to some mythical time when everybody compromised and got along swell. This never happened. Ever.”
    Paul,
    Funny thing–my husband got into a conversation with a very liberal religious Sister (older than he) last weekend. She told him she couldn’t think of any president who had been treated so roughly by the press so early in his administration as Obama. Not one. Amazing how keen our perception of “rough treatment” becomes when it’s happening to a public figure we like.

  • I hope Matthews never shuts up. He demonstrates what liberalism does to someone.

  • I submit that that is also a demonstration of a warped (universal it seems) sense of journalism.

    When I listen to, read, or watch the “news” I want to be informed. It’s not that difficult: How?; How many?; What?; When?, Where?, Who?; etc. Just the facts . . .

    Seems to me the universal journalist warp is the omission of facts that don’t advance the “narrative.” Regarding the Miner Miracle: Did any US journalist report that the first thing the miners requested when they were provided with the rescue tube was a Crucifix? Or, that our Pope personally blessed and sent each a Rosary? That they asked for statues of the Blessed Virgin and St. Lorenzo? There were many other faith facts that were censored.

    Finally, I wouldn’t hear/see liberal liars’ brain farts if they weren’t posted here.

  • Mr.Zummo- Thank you for your ability to articulate a fundamentally sound Catholic understanding of the co-equal principles of solidarity and subsidiarity.

    Thank you as well for using such an “equus asinus” (in the words of my beloved Latin professor), aka, Chris Matthews, to make your point.

  • It’s a mistake to conflate the political state with the social order, but it’s also a mistake to separate the two. Government can become something separate from the people, a tyrannical state, but it can also be a means by which the people practice justice and even charity.

  • but it can also be a means by which the people practice justice and even charity

    Not precisely ‘charity’, but redistribution and collective consumption. Discretionary authority in the distribution of benefits invites corruption.

  • Pingback: You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means. « Vox Nova
  • You know, I have to admit that I had a rather long blog written out in response to Mr. Minion’s post, but then I came to this sentence:

    The tea parties embody the worst elements of the mob rule, and mobs rarely serve the common good. There are many antecedents in history – the one that comes to mind is the riot of the Blues and the Greens against the tax policies of emperor Justinian that led to the Nika riots and the burning of Constantinople. There is no way that any of this can be seen as conservative.

    And I thought to myself, why waste time refuting that which is self-refuting.

    Affectionately,
    “that guy”

White Tea Party Racist to Run for 2012 US Presidency

Friday, September 24, AD 2010

[Update:  There is already a Draft Cain 2012 website up!]

Oh wait, the picture doesn’t follow the mainstream meme does it!

I guess Chris Matthews and Keith Olbermann’s running narrative of extremists running the Tea Party doesn’t quite fit the pic.

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7 Responses to White Tea Party Racist to Run for 2012 US Presidency

  • Token… or Uncle Tom?

  • Neither.

    He’s the real deal.

    Alex V.,

    That’s a bit of a borderline racist comment there. Be careful, we don’t tolerate that here at TAC.

    We’ll let it slide this one time in case you weren’t aware of how your comment could be read.

  • After reading this post, about a man I had never heard of, I simply had to click the link to his website, which you put in your post.

    I read the following and simply must comment that what I am posting is a quote from Mr. Cain himself, which made me laugh for the content/comment in the final line of this quote and the joy it brought to me for his having said it and the relief of having not said it myself, although I wish I did.

    He said:

    “Keep one thing in mind as we get into 2011. There are a lot of people that may be interested in seeking the Republican nomination, but I want you to remember one thing, there might also be a dark horse candidate that you don’t know about.”
    Herman Cain

    Mr Cain. Thank you. Tito, thanks to you too. I love this guy’s sense of humor.

  • Maybe it’s time again to elect someone who’s not a career politician. Couldn’t do any worse than the one we’ve got.

  • Sounds like a good man with alot of common sense. Thats exactly what we need.

  • I voted for this class act in the primary in 2004. While Isakson has been much better than expected, we really missed our chance to send a great conservative to the Senate. Herman is the real deal.

  • if you elect a career politician… you get a career politician. if you elect someone who isn’t a career politician… eveyone complains because they aren’t experienced enough.

    I’m beginning to see a slight difference with the crowd the tea party is gathering. there is a faint “so what” when someone in the media tries to make the “not enough experience” argument.