14

Playing the Race Card

“My sadness is that we are probably today more race and difference-conscious than I was in the 1960s when I went to school. To my knowledge, I was the first black kid in Savannah, Ga., to go to a white school. Rarely did the issue of race come up. …

“Now, name a day it doesn’t come up. Differences in race, differences in sex, somebody doesn’t look at you right, somebody says something. Everybody is sensitive. If I had been as sensitive as that in the 1960s, I’d still be in Savannah. Every person in this room has endured a slight. Every person. Somebody has said something that has hurt their feelings or did something to them — left them out.”

Justice Clarence Thomas, February 11, 2014

 

 

 

Race has always been a poisonous issue in American politics, and no wonder with one of the two major parties, the Democrat party, constantly using race hatred to whip up votes.    In the 1960s the Democrats changed the nature of their racial appeals, but the tactic remained the same:

 

Rather than judging people by the content of their characters, America is more race obsessed now than ever:

 

 

We, as a nation, need to get beyond the politics of grievance, especially in regard to race.   It may seem impossible to do, but it is also an essential thing to do.

“Whether one traces his Americanism back three centuries to the Mayflower, or three years of the steerage, is not half so important as whether his Americanism of to-day is real and genuine. No matter by what various crafts we came here, we are all now in the same boat.”

President Calvin Coolidge, 1925

 

3

Candace Owens on White Guilt

 

In regard to the colored people, there is always more that is benevolent, I perceive, than just, manifested towards us. What I ask for the negro is not benevolence, not pity, not sympathy, but simply justice. The American people have always been anxious to know what they shall do with us… I have had but one answer from the beginning. Do nothing with us! Your doing with us has already played the mischief with us. Do nothing with us! If the apples will not remain on the tree of their own strength, if they are worm-eaten at the core, if they are early ripe and disposed to fall, let them fall! … And if the negro cannot stand on his own legs, let him fall also. All I ask is, give him a chance to stand on his own legs! Let him alone! If you see him on his way to school, let him alone, don’t disturb him! If you see him going to the dinner table at a hotel, let him go! If you see him going to the ballot box, let him alone, don’t disturb him! If you see him going into a work-shop, just let him alone, — your interference is doing him positive injury.

January 26, 1865-Frederick Douglass

 

 

 

 

If you haven’t heard yet about internet sensation, and  conservative, Candace Owens, you will.