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Top Ten Posts of All Time on Almost Chosen People

 

 

I get in a stats mood every now and then.  Here are the top ten most viewed posts on Almost Chosen People, the American history blog I write with Paul Zummo:

  1.  Edmund Burke and the American Revolution is the top post with 13,306 views.  Go here to read it.
  2.  Jefferson and Rousseau-On Democracy comes in number two with 11,592 views.  Go here to read it.
  3.  Sam Houston and Secession is at number three with 10,615 views.  Go here to read it.
  4.  Magna Carta comes in at number four with 9,891 views.  Go here to read it.
  5.  Federalist 51-Madison comes in fifth with 8,708 views.  Go here to read it.
  6.  Washington at Prayer has had 7,316 views.  Go here to read it.
  7.  Edmund Burke’s Views on America has 6,525 views.  Go here to read it.
  8.  Lincoln on the Compromise of 1850 and the Kansas Nebraska Act comes in at 4,836 views.  Go here to read it.
  9.  George Washington in Trafalgar Square has 4,582 views.  Go here to read it.
  10.  Appropriately, Top Ten Movies for the Fourth of July with 4,194 views rounds out our top ten list.  Go here to read it.

I would note that my co-blogger Paul Zummo wrote the posts at 1,2,5, and 7 places and I drafted the remainder.

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Donald R. McClarey

Cradle Catholic. Active in the pro-life movement since 1973. Father of three and happily married for 35 years. Small town lawyer and amateur historian. Former president of the board of directors of the local crisis pregnancy center for a decade.

One Comment

  1. “Rousseau and Jefferson both emphasize a sense of duty. Rousseau writes that for the general will to have meaning “it tacitly entails the commitment – which alone can give force to the others – that whoever refuses to obey the general will will be forced to by the entire body. This means merely that he will be forced to be free.”[22] This controversial statement implies an extreme notion of duty. A person cannot truly be a member of the social order unless he is willing to do his duty for the fatherland. In order to receive the benefits of the social compact one is required to submit fully to the general will.”
    The general will of the people must be good will for the common good. Good will for the common good will be this generations legacy to our constitutional Posterity and the vehicle for advancing civilization and the protection of our advances in civilization.
    Rousseau says: “it tacitly entails the commitment – which alone can give force to the others – that whoever refuses to obey the general will will be forced to by the entire body. This means merely that he will be forced to be free.”
    The majority of one with good will for the common good cannot not be overruled by the general will, if the general will has become corrupt by the ability to “force” adherence, to force men to be “free” according to their terms. For that is not freedom but enslavement of the last citizen with good will for the common good and the advancement of civilization into all future generations, our constitutional Posterity.
    When Rousseau began speaking in terms of “force”, Rousseau left the conversation about good will for the common good by the general will of the people.

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