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Cry Rooms and Blogging

 

 

I make a point of stopping by Acts of the Apostasy a few times a week.  Here is a sample of why I do so:

 

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CHEYENNE – As Catholic Mommy blogger Courtney Kitchener-McGavin held her slightly irritable two-year old daughter Jayden during Sunday’s 11:00 AM Mass, she mentally drafted a white-hot post condemning the parishioners around her who were perturbed she didn’t take her daughter to the crying room.

“These people are gonna get it,” she hissed, her nostrils flared and eyes narrowed to mere slits of seething anger. “Tomorrow’s blog post is going to absolutely rip these people a new one. How dare they look at me with disapproval and a judgmental attitude? Don’t they know who I am?”

Courtney’s blog, “Stressed, Blest, and Breast is Best”, is one of the most widely read Catholic mommy blogs on the Internet, with tens of thousands of followers and subscribers.

“I get a million page views a month, so I have cred,” she said, her shoulders visibly shaking with rage. “These people are going to be sorry. So is the priest! The way he glanced at me when Jayden whimpered a couple times during his homily? I know what he was thinking, and frankly, I’m not going to take it.”

Courtney jotted snarky remarks and clever criticisms on an unused collection envelope during the Prayers for the Faithful, nodding approvingly with her choice selection of apt descriptors and moderate alliterations.

“Ooh, I really like the way that sounds,” she cooed, like Cruella de Vil taunting a helpless Dalmatian pup, her lips forming a self-satisfied smirk. “This is gonna be soooo good. This will go viral.”

In a rare move, Courtney bustled Jayden and her husband Roddy out of the church immediately following Holy Communion.

“I need to get home and post this right away, while it’s fresh. If there are two things I’ve learned about Catholic blogging, it’s one, write while the emotions are high and the fury is raging. And two, follow up humble apology posts are really, really popular.”

 

 

Go here to comment.  A female Mark Shea, that is what Catholic blogging needs!  When it comes to on point humor about Saint Blog’s, and Catholic life in general in the US, LarryD is a gem.  As for cry rooms, my bride and I felt like the hosts of the cry room at our parish due to our years of occupation of it when our three hellions were young!

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Donald R. McClarey

Cradle Catholic. Active in the pro-life movement since 1973. Father of three and happily married for 35 years. Small town lawyer and amateur historian. Former president of the board of directors of the local crisis pregnancy center for a decade.

20 Comments

  1. “Suffer the little children to come to me.” Courtney is obliged to stay at Mass until the priest says “Ita Missa Est.” The Mass is over and the final blessing. I attended a Mass where the people and priest all flocked to the crying babe to soothe him. People behave as though the infant does not belong to the community of faith…too much priesthood of the laity and not enough Samaritan.

  2. Mary,
    I’m just over 50 and have four “kids” ranging from 16 to 23. When my kids were under 4, if they acted up at ANY point during the Mass, we left the nave so as not to disturb others and the Mass in general. I’ve been told, by my parents, that it was quite common for one parent to stay at home with a disruptive or sick child and when the other parent returned home from Mass the other parent would then attend a later Mass. It all seems rather do able and should NOT be all about ME.

  3. The cry room is a courtesy for neighbor.
    What an act of mercy it becomes for parents to excuse themselves when the need arises.

    What an act of selfishness it is otherwise.

    Corporal works of mercy going on, “what you did for the least of my brother, you did for me.” Years ago I witnessed a priest stop his homily and ask very politely for the parents to utilize the cry room. The high pitched crying became the focus unfortunately, but it drowned out the message from the ambo. The parents complied without hesitation.

    The priest blessed them and child as they made their way to the room.

    Some priest’s, Fr. Larry Richards, disagree’s with that approach. He stops and wait’s for a break in the the outbursts, smiles, and continues on. I heard him speak on this topic less than a month ago on Catholic radio.

    Who’s right? I’d go with common courtesy.

  4. This reminds me of the post about virtue signaling 🙂 So much judgment all around…judging the judgers.
    Personally I am never bothered by little kids, or senile people who mutter or talk aloud. I am bothered by sermons waay to often. Also I need to be more copacetic about the music.
    A side benefit of wearing a crocheted triangle for a head covering– serves as blinkers when I look down– head bowed.

  5. John F. Kennedy: I have five children and I removed myself and them when they got cranky. And we went back for a later Mass. After awhile, they realized that to be still is good and they were little angels, but this was before crying rooms. It is important to bring the children to Mass. At Mass children develop their abstract thinking and their transcendent souls, the metaphysical self. Abstract thinking is indispensable in the business world and in the eternal world. I do encourage all parents with children to being them to Mass and make visits to explain the Real Presence, the saints and the rites. Magnificent.

  6. Philip Nachazel: Sometime the children, especially infants, are aware of the devil’s presence at Mass and therefore they scream. Prayers to exorcise the devil will calm the children. Father Larry Richards knows this, I bet.

  7. It’s a whole lot easier on parents and other parishioners not to take the little kids to Mass. My wife and I, with 11 kids, went to different Masses.

  8. Kids are “graced” at Mass – so much of the wonderful work done by God through their angels is unseen and undetected but still may bear fruit in their lives.
    I wish they wouldn’t usher children out for “children’s liturgy” during the reading of the Gospel.
    Maybe part of why kids are so undereducated when they graduate today- ( and vocabulary in general seems to be shrinking) – We don’t expect them to be able to listen and learn. I don’t think my grandkids are brighter than everyone else’s- but I know they can listen and learn.

  9. I love having someplace to hide when one of the kids gets going– the Duchess can get into a frenzy that is way beyond a priest’s ability to talk over her, and I’d be horrified and mortified if folks stopped focusing on Christ to rush over and fuss over my fussy kid! (Not to mention that’s usually what sets the Duchess off….)

  10. I go with common courtesy. When I was growing up, most parents with young children, that is under 3 or 4, went to separate masses so as not to disturb. It is not just the crying, but everything else that is done that is so disruptive. Mass has become a picnic, with drinks and snacks and books and toys. The parents of these children are focused on the children, not on Mass. On several occasions in the last few months, I have seen 2 different mothers put a cover over their shoulder to breath feed an infant, while sitting in the first or second row. To me this is putting the focus on the wrong place. some courtesy to those around you is just common sense.

  11. What a reminder of why we became Byzantine Catholic! Children are full members of the church, it’s their birthright to be there and receive the Eucharist. You think it’s selfish to bring children to church, selfish to nurse them when they’re hungry? Shame on you, and the next generation won’t be Catholic if everybody followed your rules. Christ said the kingdom belongs to such as they. You need to be more like them to be holy, not the other way around. There’s somebody here who’s selfish and it’s not the sweet families who are working very hard to raise children in the faith.

  12. I closed up our “Cry Room” years ago. I’ve told people that children need to be at Mass with their parents and if a child cries it just means that they are going to some day lead the choir. The people have responded well. I also tell them “If your child needs to be taken out for a diaper change or a little walk we understand that. Go ahead and do it, if you want. But come right back in and anyone who gives you a dirty look will get a free “grouchy face” sticker from me personally! It’s gotten to the point where I can say “Ah, we have a lot of children here this morning! I hope I can get them all to sing together!” We’ve turned the situation into a joyful celebration of “Children are welcome!” Now, if they could just get ME to stop making so much noise! LOL

  13. Reminds me of a story by Archbishop Sheen. A baby started to cry, during one of the Archbishop’s sermons, and as the mother got up to leave, Archbishop Sheen saw her, and said, “Please don’t leave, he’s not bothering me.” The mother replied, “No Archbishop, your bothering him!”

  14. Abby.
    No one is saying, STAY AWAY.

    Please use common sense.

    Is that bad?

    If you can’t because of the circumstances…Your a single mom and have three others in tow, the eldest is 7 and can’t properly take on the responsibility of the other two… Okay.
    Stay there of course.

    If you are able to utilize the cry room and the baby isn’t receiving the help of the good angel’s, but the devils are having a ball with her, then get up.
    Excuse yourself.
    Be polite.
    Be sympathetic to those around you.

    Why should a priest have to compete with a toddler and an obstinate mother who chooses to wait out the spell, regardless of the other worshipping parishioners.

    I guess I just don’t get it.
    Oh well.
    Thanks for your oppression on us.

  15. I don’t recall our sons as infants crying in church. When they were toddlers they were very, very active. My husband was at sea during most of that period and I found the nursery or the crying room to be helpful.
    I could concentrate on the Mass and the boys were not annoying/distracting others. Except on two occasions: at the younger son’s baptism the older one escaped from my mother’s grip and rang the bells on the altar; once in a packed crying room when I was listening intently to a good homily, suddenly the priest”s lips were moving but there was no sound. My 3 year old was no longer in the room. I rapidly crossed the hall to another room and saw my little fellow at the controls of the sound system. Praying that I would select the right button I restored the sound. Why is it children from an early age always know how to operate electronic devices?
    I am still amazed at the parents who do not correct or remove their misbehaving children from the church during services. It is particularly bad at the Spanish language Mass at my small church with young children walking up and down the aisles, and transversing past the altar at the Consecration with the “aren’t I cute” look on their faces. I think to myself, “No you are not cute and where is your mother or father?”. After one Spanish Mass I was in the church kitchen readying after Mass snacks when the priest came in. I said to father that he had a good crowd at the service. He said, “Good? No, there were screamers and running down the aisle!” I laughed and said, ” I meant a good number in attendance.” He was from a big family and liked children but at Mass he was reverent and took great care in delivering his sermon in Spanish.
    Catholic school and parents teach their children the proper respect to be shown during the Mass. The occasional sermon on rubrics of reception of Communion and decorum/dress is helpful for all ages.
    Yes, there are adults who loudly talk either before or during the service. I wish I could say they are senile which would be more understandable, but they are not hard of hearing or senile. The after Mass Coffee is the time to catch up or in the vestibule.
    I’m a proponent of breast feeding but not on the front rows of the church – some babies nurse loudly and a few mothers have a defiant agenda wherein they don’t care if it makes men uncomfortable, they are going to do it as conspicuously as possible and wherever they please.

  16. Well, apparently this parody is less of a broad, general parody than I thought… ran into some “to heck with you if you can’t focus on Christ over the sounds God designed to get attention” stuff in circles I’m pretty sure are closer to the author’s.
    Ugh.

  17. Foxfier.

    Funny thing. We are to take distractions and pray through them. The clicking of teeth from the fellow on the left. The mumbler on the right. It’s part of a penance we do.

    The “heck with you,” attitude is incredible.

  18. I worship in a parish of the Ordinariate of the Chair of St Peter (Google it) and our congregation is about 60% minor children, thanks be to God. I myself am a senior and unmarried, and each time one of our littlest makes him/herself known AS A MEMBER OF THE CONGREGATION I rejoice to think: In another place, you could have been aborted.

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