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Leonard Nimoy: Requiescat in Pace

 

A sad day.  Leonard Nimoy has departed this Vale of Tears.

Leonard Nimoy, the legendary actor who played Mr Spock in Star Trek, has died at the age of 83.

The star, who was first cast in the science-fiction series in the mid-1960s, suffered from COPD – chronic obstructive pulmonary disease – and was rushed to the UCLA Medical Center after a 911 call on February 19.

His wife Susan Bay Nimoy and son Adam confirmed he passed away at his Bel Air, Los Angeles, home on Friday morning.

Nimoy’s final tweet from his hospital bed urged fans to ‘live long and prosper’. 

Few actors have become so associated with a role as Nimoy did with the character Spock.  Immediately after TOS he was concerned about being typecast, but he long ago came to terms with the role of Spock, a character he invested with dignity, and, dare I say it, humanity.  Live long and prosper in the world to come Mr. Nimoy.

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Donald R. McClarey

Cradle Catholic. Active in the pro-life movement since 1973. Father of three and happily married for 35 years. Small town lawyer and amateur historian. Former president of the board of directors of the local crisis pregnancy center for a decade.

11 Comments

  1. Dear God, if it be your will, please welcome Mr Spock who brought us a truly admirable role model. –

    Mr. Spock, yes; Leonard Nimoy, like nearly all of us, needed some work. (The first woman who held the job “Mrs. Leonard Nimoy” later felt compelled to form a support group called “Hollywood Dumpettes”).

  2. You are correct, Art. In my case, I know I deserve hell, and I am just a mediocre man, unlike Leonard Nimoy who was a great man. Perhaps the greater the man, the greater the folly. 🙁

  3. “I suggest in our charity”

    I suggest in our charity De mortuis nihil nisi bonum, at least on the day of his death. In his politics Nimoy shared in the left wing loonism that seemed to infect most of the actors and actresses of his generation. If that were all there was to the man I would not waste a post on his death. It is due to his role as Spock that his cultural significance arises, and please let us keep the focus firmly on that.

  4. I have wanted to say a few words on why Spock was among my favorite Star Trek characters (along with Seven of Nine and Data). While Leonard Nimoy had failings in his personal life (any here exempt from failings?) and sin (again, anyone exempt from sin?), the character he gave us showed that reason and facts and the good of the other person can be placed ahead of one’s own selfish, emotional desires. While the liberalism that Nimoy espoused as his life went on exults in selfish emotionalism, Spock did not allow himself to be influenced by that. He could set his face like flint to do what is right no matter how he personally felt about the matter, and he always had an impeccably logical reason for doing what was right. For Spock, doing what was right is the only logical path, and right is objective and knowable. The tumult of his feelings did not get in the way. As an adolescent youngster, that appealed to me greatly. And his father Sarek was of like mind, and the philosophy of logic and non-violence that Surak in ancient Vulcan history had developed was created specifically because of the violent, war-like, overly-emotional, self-destructive tendencies of Vulcans as a species. Their close cousins the Romulans who early broke away, having rejected Surak’s philosophy, showed what happens when emotionalism and selfishness rule the day – dictatorial empire, a course which our liberal society seems hell-bent on creating.
    .
    I do not think Nimoy will be remembered for his liberalism. Rather, he will be remembered for giving us Spock: a man truly moral because he placed reason and facts ahead of selfish desire. I hope God remembers the good that Nimoy did and not just the bad. Otherwise, we are all doomed. But God is just and God is merciful.

  5. Reason. Restraint. Self-sacrifice.
    Well worth admiring, especially in a time that idolizes the impulse, the examined emotion, the “because I wanna” impulse.

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