ObamaCare Decision: Rousing a Sleeping Giant

 

Evidence is beginning to come in to support my contention that the ObamaCare decision of last week was a disaster for the Obama reelection effort.  From Scott Rasmussen the best of the presidential horserace pollsters:

 

The Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll for Sunday shows President Obama attracting 45% of the vote, while Mitt Romney earns 45%. Four percent (4%) prefer some other candidate, and six percent (6%) are undecided.

 

Matchup results are updated daily at 9:30 a.m. Eastern (sign up for free daily e-mail update).

 

Today’s results are the same as they were just before the Supreme Court ruled on the health care law. See tracking history.

 

However, intensity is up among conservatives. On Thursday morning, 43% of conservative voters were following the presidential race on a daily basis. That’s up to 51% today. It remains to be seen whether this is a lasting change, statistical noise, or a temporary response to the health care ruling.

 

Just 28% of moderates and 31% of liberals are following the race that closely. Those numbers are little changed since the Supreme Court ruling. Interest in a campaign is typically a good early indicator of voter turnout.”

 

Donations are flooding in to the Romney campaign in the wake of the decision, and the Tea Party has been reinvigorated.  With a lousy economy to contend with, the ObamaCare decision is the coup de grace to the re-election effort of Barack Obama.  The Roberts’ flip, the details of which are now leaking out,  gave Obama a legal victory and a political defeat.

Update I:  The Rasmussen daily tracking poll for July 2, shows Romney in the lead:

The Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll for Monday shows Mitt Romney attracting 46% of the vote, while President Obama earns 44%. Four percent (4%) prefer some other candidate, and five percent (5%) are undecided.

Matchup results are updated daily at 9:30 a.m. Eastern (sign up for free daily e-mail update). See tracking history.

While the Supreme Court declared that the president’s health care law is constitutional, they were unable to make it popular. Fifty-two percent (52%) still favor repeal of the law. That’s little changed from a week ago and little changed since the law was passed more than two years ago. However, while most voters still hope for repeal, the belief that it will happen has fallen sharply.  Just 39% now believe repeal is even somewhat likely, down from 61% last week.

Ratings for the Supreme Court have slipped since the health care ruling.  A week ago, 36% said the high court was doing a good or an excellent job. That’s down to 33% today. The big change is a rise in negative perceptions. Today, 28% say the court is doing a poor job. That’s up 11 points over the past week.

A growing number (56%) now believe the Justices pursue their own agenda rather than ruling on an impartial basis. Also, the number who see the Court as too liberal is up while the number who see it as too conservative is down. The Court’s ratings are slipping at a time when just 22% believe the government has the consent of the governed.

 

 

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