Auld Lang Syne

YouTube Preview Image

Something for the weekend.  Auld Lang Syne sung by the incomparable Arethra Franklin.  Written by the immortal Scots poet Bobby Burns in 1788, his poem captured perfectly the grandeur of human memory as it ponders the cherished past.  It is very appropriate that it has become an essential part of New Year’s Eve celebrations.  Here is his original version:

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,

and never brought to mind ?

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,

and auld lang syne ?

                                                                                                                   

For auld lang syne, my jo (or my dear),

for auld lang syne,

we’ll tak a cup o’ kindness

for auld lang syne.

And surely ye’ll be your pint-stowp !

and surely I’ll be mine !

And we’ll tak a cup o’ kindness yet,

for auld lang syne.

                                                                                                                   

We twa hae run about the braes,

and pu’d the gowans fine ;

But we’ve wander’d mony a weary fit,

sin auld lang syne.

                                                                                                                     

We twa hae paidl’d i’ the burn,

frae morning sun till dine;

But seas between us braid hae roar’d

sin auld lang syne.

                                                                                                                          

And there’s a hand, my trusty fiere!

and gie’s a hand o’ thine !

And we’ll tak a right gude-willy waught,

for auld lang syne.

Translated into Sassenach:

Should old acquaintance be forgot,

and never brought to mind?

Should old acquaintance be forgot,

and old lang syne ?

      

For auld lang syne, my dear,

for auld lang syne,

we’ll take a cup of kindness yet,

for auld lang syne.

And surely you’ll buy your pint cup!

and surely I’ll buy mine!

And we’ll take a cup o’ kindness yet,

for auld lang syne.

We two have run about the slopes,

and picked the daisies fine ;

But we’ve wandered many a weary foot,

since auld lang syne.

We two have paddled in the stream,

from morning sun till dine;

But seas between us broad have roared

since auld lang syne.

And there’s a hand my trusty friend!

And give us a hand o’ thine!

And we’ll take a right good-will draught,

for auld lang syne.

YouTube Preview Image

4 Responses to Auld Lang Syne

  • Ah, Scottish– just as hard to understand as my dad always told me! (to be fair, it probably didn’t help that his exposure was from grandfathers and great-uncles…his great grandma, too, I think)

    Another translation:
    Should old acquaintances be forgotten,
    And never brought to mind?
    Should old acquaintances be forgotten,
    And days of long ago !
    Chorus:
    For old long ago, my dear
    For old long ago,
    We will take a cup of kindness yet
    For old long ago.
    We two have run about the hillsides
    And pulled the daisies fine,
    But we have wandered many a weary foot
    For old long ago.
    We two have paddled (waded) in the stream
    From noon until dinner time,
    But seas between us broad have roared
    Since old long ago.
    And there is a hand, my trusty friend,
    And give us a hand of yours,
    And we will take a goodwill draught (of ale)
    For old long ago!
    And surely you will pay for your pint,
    And surely I will pay for mine!
    And we will take a cup of kindness yet
    For old long ago!

    I suspect love for this song tracks rather closely with love of fantasy lit.

  • Each bought his own cup and together they shared times and experiences. No wonder there’s hope for a cup of kindness when old acquaintance is remembered. Friends from time ago are still so. In 2011, ‘friend’ has taken on a whole different usage.

  • Thanks for providing a translation. Here’s a humorous take one the Scots brogue:

  • A laugh is a good way to start the year Thomas! I have enough Scots blood in me to appreciate this old Mony Python sketch:

Follow TAC by Clicking on the Buttons Below
Bookmark and Share
Subscribe by eMail

Enter your email:

Recent Comments
Archives
Our Visitors. . .
Our Subscribers. . .