Attention Las Vegas Catholics

This is a request for assistance from our readers to suggest a good parish inside the Diocese of Las Vegas for my family.

What I am asking in particular is a parish that has an orthodox priest that celebrates the Mass reverently.  That is not asking much.  Preferably a holy and charitable priest.

To be more specific, though this isn’t necessary, it would be nice if the architecture of the church did not resemble a Brady Bunch-1970s style of a building.  Again, preferably, a church with pre-Vatican II type of architecture.

What do I mean by reverently?

There are no liturgical dancers.  It can be either the Ordinary Form or the Extraordinary form.  The music isn’t post-Vatican II.  To be fair to the good music after Vatican II, I mean folksie type of music.  Preferably portions of the Mass are chanted rather than sung in Latin as well as the liturgy itself.

What do I mean by orthodox?

A priest that holds strict fidelity to the teachings of Magisterium.  That can explain the most difficult concepts with charity.  One that has one or two devotionals that doesn’t include reiki pantomimes nor walking in circles reciting the Beatles greatest hits.

You might be asking, “aren’t all priest suppose to be this way and celebrate the Mass reverently?”.

Yes, but unfortunately we live in a fallen world where pride creeps in and manifests itself in diluting the teachings of the Church and turning the Mass into a Joel Osteen-eco-revival-cumbaya-fest.

I have attended many Catholic churches in Las Vegas when I visit my family and am disgusted at what I witness during the Mass at the few churches that I do attend during my visit.

Granted this is only at a small portion of parishes and I am sure there are proper Catholic priests and parishes, but I do not have the time to visit them on my short family visits.

So please, leave your recommendations in the comments box!

Thank you and God bless.

24 Responses to Attention Las Vegas Catholics

  • Spambot says:

    Not a recommendation, but a question: At my parish, priests are rotated in and out every few years. So, if that’s true in Las Vegas and today you pick a parish with priests to your liking, isn’t the lineup just going to change before long?

  • Bender says:

    What do I mean by orthodox?

    If we want to get technical in our orthdoxy and tradition, then the proper parish is the one whose territorial boundaries encompass your home. THAT is the proper parish according to canon law and consistent with the teachings of the Magisterium.

    The practice of parish shopping, while widespread post-Vatican II, is one contrary to tradition, which has long followed the idea of the neighborhood parish. This is also more consistent with the truth that we are One Church, not an alliance of separate churchs and congregations, and that the Lord Himself is present, Body and Blood, at each of these parishes.

    We may not particularly like the members of our family — but they are family. We may not like their music, we may not like their architecture, we may not like their wishy-washy homilies, but they are family.

  • Tito Edwards says:

    I’m sure Jesus wouldn’t mind if my family were to attend a different parish rather from the one that has led many into apathy.

    But your argument is a straw man.

    I’d like to know a good parish to recommend to my parents.

    I’d rather not debate your issues with canon law.

  • Zach says:

    I’ve also been persuaded by orthodoxy (read: right opinion on this particular issue. Catholics should attend a church within their parish, that is near the physical land on which they live. Jesus is in every Catholic Church, even the ugly ones. And perhaps the ugly churches (physically or spiritually ugly) need orthodox Catholics more than anywhere else. We are all called to evangelize, and sometimes evangelization happens at our own parish! Orthodox Catholics cannot sequester themselves off from the rest of the Church at parishes with good priests and good liturgy.

    Also this is a great way for Catholics to recover a sense of place, something that has been totally lost in hyper-mobile 21st century America.

    We do not pick and choose our Churches as Catholics. It’s a protestant attitude and bad practice for members of a universal Church.

  • John Rondina says:

    As far as I can find in Las Vegas there are only 2 pre Vatican II style church buildings. One is St. Joan of Arch in the downtown area. I have been there a couple of times for evening non-Sunday mass. I did not find any major problems.

    The second is St. Joseph, Husband of Mary. It is a rather new building but it is beautifuly done inside and out. An intresting mix of old and new on the inside. I have not attended mass there. It is on Saharra Av.between Rainbow Bl. and Buffalo.

    Another choice is a new styled church is St. Bridget on 14th street just west of downtown. For a modern building it OK. The Tabernacle is smack in the middle of the sancatuary. The 9:30 am Sunday mass is a Hybred Latin and English Mass. Very well said by Fr. Leo the congreation is very reserved and reverant.

    I have been to this mass on several occasions.

    St. Bridget aslo hosts the only Authorized TLM in southern Nevada. It is only on the first Friday of the Month. I was there for this mass in June 2010.

    Do not be fooled by “St.Joseph Catholic Church” on the east side of downtown Las Vegas it is “Old Catholic” and not in union with Rome.

    If you want to broaden your catholic expierence. Las Vegas has four Eastern Rite Catholic parishes, all in union with Rome.

    Our Lady of Wisdom Italo-Byzantine, Lindell and O’bannon. My home parish when I am in residence in Las Vegas.

    St. Barbara Chaldean Parish Near the Meadows Mall. This is quite a diffrent expierence very reverant.
    Upon entry via the center aisle the priest bow at 3 diffrent places before entering the sancatuary, prostrates himself before the eucharist. The liturgy is mostly in Chaldean or Arabic. A good Expierence.

    St.Sharbel Maronite several miles south of downtown and about a mile east of the South Point Hotel. Somewhat like the Novus Ordo in its presentation but with more prayers and added rituals to the Liturgy.
    another good expeirence. They have an English Mass and an Arabic Mass.

    St. Gabriel the Archangel Ruthenian-Byzantine,2250 Maule ave., just south of McCarren airport. I have not been there. I have attended other Ruthenian Parishes. Another good venture. the Liturug is in English.

    I hope these selections help you out.

  • Elaine Krewer says:

    I was once told, by a priest knowledgeable about canon law, that nothing in Church law forbids a person from holding membership in more than one parish. You can hold membership in your territorial neighborhood parish AND also enroll in another parish if there is good reason to do so — for example, if that parish has a school in which you want to enroll your children, if it has priests who speak your native language, or if it has liturgies of a different rite (including TLM) that are not available at your “home” parish. If you belong to more than one parish, of course, you have a certain obligation to support both, financially and by your attendance.

  • Tito Edwards says:

    John R.,

    It doesn’t necessarily have to be pre-Vatican II type of architecture.

    What’s important is a good and holy priest.

    And thanks for the recommendations.

    The eastern rites are awesome.

    Saint Joseph, Husband of Mary, was my old parish. It has since gone off the deep end and are heretical.

    Part of the reason for this posting.

    Thanks for all the suggestions!

  • Andrew Ridgley says:

    I’m a 19 year old who lives in Spokane, WA. But I use to live in Las Vegas when I was a kid for about 10 years. From my experience, I would recommand St. Joseph, Husband of Mary.
    As John Rondina posted, “It is a rather new building but it is beautifuly done inside and out. An intresting mix of old and new on the inside.”
    All the priests that I use to know when I attended to that Church were simple, orthodox Catholics who always pledged their obedience to the decrees of the Apostolic See. However, I do not know what the new priests are like now.
    But I say give it a try with my beloved Church. I do miss going there every Sunday.
    Also, I ask many of you to please pray for me as I will be entering the Seminary soon. I pray that I will be studying under the guidance and leader of His Excellency, Bishop Robert Vasa from the Diocese of Baker, Oregon.
    May our Heavenly Father continue to bless all of you and the U.S. Constitution

  • Tito:

    I tend to agree with the ones who questioned whether or not this was a good idea. Parish-shopping isn’t a great thing, especially when you’re picking churches in part based on architecture. Screwtape #16 has a lot to say on this-

    I had more typed, but I decided this would make a good post to kick off the week with. ;)

  • Andrew Ridgley says:

    To Tito Edwards:
    It breaks my heart that many Catholic Americans are drifting away from the teachings of the Catholic Church, especially from the decrees of the Holy See.

    Praying the Rosary always facilitates the situations that any Catholic faces in life. Hopefully our Blessed Mother will guide us to Her Son and comfort us when we need to be comforted.

    I look forward to your response, Tito. God Bless

  • I highly recommend St. Elizabeth Ann Seton parish in the Summerlin area of Las Vegas. I have also heard good things about St. Francis in Henderson, Nevada, which is the largest city adjacent to Las Vegas. The latter can be found here: http://www.sfahdnv.org/ The former here: http://www.parishesonline.com/scripts/hostedsites/Org.asp?ID=6911

    Whenever we are in Vegas–which is often–my wife and I attend the 4 pm Saturday Vigil mass at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton. We do so because it has a solid pastor and it is literally across the street from my sister-in-law’s home, where we stay when we are in Vegas.

  • Tito Edwards says:

    Francis,

    Thank you for those recommendations.

    I truly appreciate the suggestions and will be visiting all of them when I visit my family and bring them along.

    In a nutshell, if the pastor is solid, then the parish will follow.

  • Zach says:

    Tito, I do not understand my comment to be a distraction. I think it’s a direct response to what you are talking about here.

    I don’t appreciate your sarcasm or you ignoring it, though.

  • Regarding St Joseph Husband of Mary – you may be able to avoid liturgical abuse there, but you are not getting any chant! Fr Marc is not a fan of it. You get a lot of Protestant hymns. Bleh!

    Your best bet for a reverently celebrated Mass is St Bridgets 9:30am Mass. Even though they dont have a choir (which is by choice – my chant group offered and were turned down) the congregation chants. Communion has a recording of chant.

    St Francis used to be pretty solid. But is no longer, ever since Fr Greg left.

    Dont personally know about St Elizabeth Ann Seton but I have heard good things.

    A decent parish is hard to find. Half the churches here qualify as protestant. Sad. Stay away from Christ the King Parish – they have liturgical dance! I still do not understand why the Bishop refuses to crack down on them!

  • Jeanne says:

    Tito,

    It’s ironic to me that you would indicate that you are interested in finding a parish in Las Vegas that has a good and holy priest at a parish that adheres to the Magisterium; yet you seem to discourage a 19-year-old (Andrew Ridgley) who tells you that he will be entering the seminary. Instead of offering encouragement for his holy vocation (especialy during this time of a shortage of priests), you tell him that the church isn’t what it used to be. To add insult to injury, you don’t even reply to him when he says that he is looking forward to hearing back from you. Honestly, I don’t get your thinking.

    My family has lived in Las Vegas for many years. I don’t live there now, but I go back to visit regularly. Growing up there, I attended Catholic elementary and high schools. When I began reading your post, I understood your reason for asking for input from others. However, I have to say that you lost me after I read your response to Andrew. Thanks be to God, Andrew sounds like someone who will not be easily dissuaded. I will pray for him, and others like him.

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