Donald R. McClarey

Cradle Catholic. Active in the pro-life movement since 1973. Father of three and happily married for 35 years. Small town lawyer and amateur historian. Former president of the board of directors of the local crisis pregnancy center for a decade.

7 Comments

  1. I wonder if people in the late 1200’s/early 1300’s would look at their intellectually challenged companion and comment “well, he’s no Aquinas”.

  2. Jesus is God so I never bring him into statements regarding mere mortals. As for Solomon, my money would be on the chubby Dominican.

  3. “I wonder if people in the late 1200’s/early 1300’s would look at their intellectually challenged companion and comment “well, he’s no Aquinas”.

    Actually, the term “dunce” to refer to an intellectually challenged person came from Blessed John Duns Scotus, one of the best known theologians after Aquinas. Duns Scotus was born in 1266, a few years before Aquinas died, and is best known for his arguments in favor of Mary’s Immaculate Conception (which, of course, eventually carried the day and led to its definition as dogma). Duns Scotus was a Francisan while Aquinas belonged to their “rival” order, the Dominicans.

    Despite Duns Scotus’ brilliance, in the 15th and 16th centuries his approach to theology fell out of favor, and people began referring to his followers as “Dunses,” which later morphed into the term “dunce.”

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