Doug Hoffman Takes Lead in Poll

Tuesday, October 27, AD 2009

Take this with more than a grain of salt, since the Club for Growth supports him, but in the latest poll by the Club for Growth Doug Hoffman, the pro-life Conservative Party candidate  in the special election in the New York 23rd Congressional District endorsed by Sarah Palin and other Republican Party luminaries, leads with 31.3% of the vote to 27% for Bill Owens the Democrat and 19.7% for the pro-abort leftist Republican Dede Scozzafava., with 22% undivided.

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10 Responses to Doug Hoffman Takes Lead in Poll

  • If anything Mr. Hoffman’s support has gone up. The question is, is it enough to lead the polls?

    I’ll believe it when I see a more credible poll. Though a 5% margin of error isn’t bad for the Conservative Party candidate.

  • “Maddeningly the Republican National Committee is pumping money into Scozzafava’s campaign and running adds against Hoffman. This is an excellent way to alienate the conservative base of the party. Idiocy, sheer idiocy.”

    THE GOP is doing what it is suppose too. At least some of them. The GOP is a party that has “moderates” too and we shall see what can of worms have been opened up by this.

    The problem is in New York and people would be much better off changing the leadership there in the party. THE prob;lem is not the National GOP.

    I hope I don’t wake up and see Republicans for Free Choice and the Olympia Snowes of the world campaigning for conservative yet pro choice “independents” against GOP pro-lifers we picked in our primary. If they do then a lot of people will not have a moral arguement against it

    I think in the long run this will backfire but again the GOP has no choice here. Unless we are taking a stand that local control of the party should be micromanaged from Washington?

  • My Lord! No other phrase captures what I am thinking other than “Idiocy!” How could the republicans be stupid? This is a telling display of how the republicans are losing voters. Pro life is 98% of the reason I vote at all yet alone republican. I wish they would get that through their heads…

  • It sounds a lot like the kind of craziness the GOP pulled on Congressman Paul in the 14th District of Texas. In ’96 they recruited the DEMOCRAT to switch parties and run as the G.O.P. -backed candidate. Paul was able to survive into the run-off , and then won by simply reminding everyone how liberal his ‘establishment’ opponent really was.

    If the Republicans insist on choosing ‘winners’ over their principles, I hope more and more people defect. They have not learned their lessons after 2006 and 2008.

  • Robert I agree with you in the need to keep the GOP as Pro-life as possible. But the problem here is not the National GOP but the New York GOP. Again do we really want the National GOP to decide what races it will fund and not fund. The local party in New York needs to change

  • jh is right. The national GOP cannot be expected to overrule the state GOP; that is just not realistic. NY conservatives cannot bolt from the GOP in favor of the NY Conservative Party and then feel entitled to get angry when the National GOP supports the GOP candidate over their own party candidate.

  • I’m nervous about the 23% that are undecided. Expect more of Scozzafava’s numbers to migrate to Hoffman and then hold your breath for the next 7-8 days!

  • The Republicans are showing their true colors – this is another momment of decision. Will the Republican party hold to authentic conservative and traditional values or will they be run by liberal, establishment Democrat-lite insiders?

    This is not a political question – it is a question of culture. Are conservatives and traditionalists strong and principled enough to rout the liars or will we be left with the choice of speedy progressives and not-so-fast progressives again?

    Goldwater, Reagan, Paul and Hoffman (and Palin) are examples of the people choosing principles over political-pragmatism. You can either change the Republican party or migrate to another. Perhaps the Conservative Party will grow and the Republican party die, or publically merge with the Democrats, rather than keep up the farce that they are two different parties. In fact, the Republicans and the Democrats are just slightly different factions of the same oligarchy.

  • NY conservatives cannot bolt from the GOP in favor of the NY Conservative Party and then feel entitled to get angry when the National GOP supports the GOP candidate over their own party candidate.

    Once more with feeling. Mr. Hoffmann is an enrolled Republican. Ten county chairmen in the North Country selected Mrs. Scozzafava as a candidate by a weighted vote among themselves per the Election Law of New York. There was no petition process or primary. The North Country is not the east side of Manhattan or Westchester. Common-and-garden Republicans can and do poll well there. The county chairmen have been playing an obscure insider game and expected (as New York pols do) that the electorate would suck it up (as that electorate generally does if you do not poison the water table or forthrightly and transparently raise their property taxes). These ten individuals cannot legitimately complain if their own committeemen flip them the bird, much less if everyone else does.

  • Art, I agree, and admit that you have a far better grasp of the facts than me. My only remaining point would be that it is difficult to expect the national GOP to ignore or overrule the decisions of the local GOP, regardless the mechanisms or machinations behind those local decisions. It would be different if the national GOP were complicit in such insider games, but no one has suggested that, but instead some seem to want to count deference to local decisions as complicity. That just strikes me as unfair and unrealistic.

Father Hinds Planned To Lay Off Suspect

Tuesday, October 27, AD 2009

Father Edward “Ed” Hinds was found dead in the rectory kitchen of 32 stab wounds late last week in the Diocese of

Father Edward Hines

Fr. Ed Hinds

Paterson located in the area of Chatham, New Jersey.  A suspect has been found who is the church janitor, Jose Feliciano.  He is currently in a hospital because of an undisclosed ailment and has bail set on him of $1 million.

Details are emerging concerning the case.  Mr. Feliciano has had financial and health-related worries.  He was recently laid off his second job earlier in the year.  Additionally The Star-Ledger (New Jersey) reports:

In addition, Hinds intended to lay off Feliciano because of money problems at St. Patrick Church, said Ken Mullaney, the attorney for the Diocese of Paterson.

Jose Feliciano

Suspect, Jose Feliciano

Many parishioners are calling this a double tragedy since Mr. Feliciano was also part of the close Chatham community as well as with the parish of Saint Patrick.

_._

For the previous article by the American Catholic click here.

For the most current article by The Star-Ledger as of this posting click here.

For a compilation of the latest news concerning the murder of Fr. Ed Hines click here. (The link may become inactive as time passes.)

_._

Update I: I misspelled Father Edward Hinds name.  It is Fr. Hinds, not Fr. Hines.

Update II: Information about Fr. Hinds funeral and more click here.

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8 Responses to Father Hinds Planned To Lay Off Suspect

  • I hope Jose Feliciano is happier now and his money worries have ceased. What a bum.

  • I could see stress and anxiety as causing Mr. Feliciano to be upset about the possibility of losing his job, but to the extent of extinguishing a life…

    I just can’t figure out why? Why go that far?

    From the article I read, he is known for a cool temperament and not known for losing his temper at all.

  • I can commiserate with Mr Feliciano as it is likely that he was under unrelieved financial pressure. The correct way for a man in his position to handle it though is to declare bankcruptcy and ride around in a bicycle. There is no way for a man his age and position to pay off a mortgage of close to $145,000. One simply has to swallow one’s pride and relax. Millionaires and billionaires do the same. There is no shame once one has tried his best.

  • Hmmm. The alleged murderer could have applied for unemployment, looked for work, entered into a forebearance program on his mortagage with his bank, explored bankruptcy with an attorney, etc. No doubt some nuts will now attempt to use the fact that he was having a hard time as excusing his alleged murder of a priest. I deal with people who are hard pressed financially each and every day and none of them think the solution to their problems is murder.

  • How sad but I figured as much. Well, he has no more money worries. Taking Father’s life wasn’t the answer and whatever he was doing to get Father’s attention wasn’t the answer either.

  • I knew Father Hines as a pastor, a man but moreover as a true friend. He graced me with his presence officiating my marriage and was a true inspiration to many and a leader of the faithful in Boonton and Chester.

    When these things happen, I often am reminded what is at the center of the bible: “It is better to trust in the Lord than to put confidence in man”. It is the exact center of his word (594 chapters before Psalms 118 and 594 chapters after). If you add 594+594 = 1188 – Psalms 118:8 is the center of his word.

    He was an inspiration and he will be truely missed by all that love him dearly. God will love him as he loves and protects us…

  • Robert J. Abate,

    Thank you for sharing your thoughts and feelings.

    That is truly a wonderful and heart warming passage. I often go back to God knowing that His plan is best for all of us and this relieves many of my anxieties.

    In Jesus, Mary, & Joseph,

    Tito

  • Pingback: Funeral and Repast for Father Hinds Today « The American Catholic

Padre of Guadalcanal

Monday, October 26, AD 2009

BE058992Frederic Gehring was probably lucky that he was born and reared in Brooklyn.  It has always been a tough town and it prepared him for the adventurous life he was to lead.  Born on January 20, 1903,  he went on to attend and graduated from Saint John’s Prep.  Setting his eyes on being a missionary priest, he entered the minor seminary of the Vincentians, Saint Joseph’s, near Princeton,  New Jersey.  Earning his BA in 1925, he entered the seminary of Saint Vincent’s in Philadelphia.

Ordained as a priest on May 22, 1930, he was unable to immediately go to China due to military activity of the Communists in Kiangsi province.  For three years he traveled throughout the US raising funds for the missions in China, and, at long last, in 1933 he was able to pack his bags and sailed for China.  Laboring in the Chinese missions from 1933-1939 in the midst of warlordism, civil war and the invasion of China, commencing in 1937, by Japan must have been tough, but Father Gehring was always up to any challenge.  For example,  in 1938 Japanese planes strafed a mission he was at.  Father Gehring ran out waving a large American flag in hopes that the Japanese would not wish to offend a powerful neutral nation and would stop the strafing.  The Japanese planes did fly off, and Father Gehring was pleased until someone at the mission pointed out that maybe the Japanese had simply run out of ammo!  In 1939 Father Gerhring returned to the States to raise funds for the missions.

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18 Responses to Padre of Guadalcanal

  • Another great story Don.

    My oldest son is currently in Honiara on Guadalcanal with the Australia & NZ Bank as their regional corporate manager. He has sent some interesting photos back (also on Facebook) of some of the memorial sites around the island.
    He will be returning home in November after a year away – haven’t had the chance to go and visit him there, much to my chagrin – I love travel.

  • Thanks for the great article about the Padre of Guadalcanal.
    He was my instructor at St. John’s, Jamaica, NY..and we all loved him, especially his wonderful stories.
    Loved it. God Bless!

  • A beautiful story. I am glad that the good Padre lived on to do many other good works after the war was over.

    And I love the story about Ross and “The Yiddisher Mama” song. I’m sure there was plenty of mutual respect among the men of different faiths fighting that war, even if that generation did not feel the need to trumpet their “diversity” and “inclusiveness” to the world.

  • Don, I will say again that it is a small world! I know only one person who has been to Guadalcanal, a retired Methodist Minister, who was a navy corpsman with the Marines in 42. He has some interesting tales to tell!

    Helen, I envy you. In addition to being a great priest and a very brave man I also suspect he was a character and a half, and I would have loved to have heard his stories!

    Donna, I have noticed in the military that almost all differences become small ones when facing a crisis, and there is no crisis like combat.

  • The article on Father Gehring and Barney Ross was fasinating to read and is very personal to me. I have been researching the 52nd Field Hospital on Guadalcanal. I had heard about the Christmas Service from a army veteran who was with the 101st Medical Regiment with the Americal Division. People forget that the Army entered combat in Nov. ’42’ and fought along side the Marines. I have often wondered about the details of the Christmas Service as mentioned in the letter from a veteran. He humbly stated that on Christmas Eve services were held at the chapel tent and Barney Ross, ex-boxing Champ sang and played the orgin and he was quite good! I have often wondered where did the organ come from on a jungle island during some of the most savage combat of the pacific? Well now I know, thanks to Father Gehring’s personal belongings. I love the photograph and would like to use it for a unit history that I am working on for the 52nd. I plan on devoting a segment to the Ministries including the Chapel that the natives built for the cemetery dedication, and also the hospitals own chapel tent who’s altar was painted in frescos by one of the enlisted personnel. One more interesting fact that I was told by my dad who was a member of the 52nd was the death of Father Neil Doyle who was wounded on New Georgia and died on the operating table after being evacuated to Guadalcanal. He had developed gangrene in his leg and my dad donated blood for his surgery. The hospital personnel really took it hard when news spread that he had died. He was wounded giving last rites on the battlefield on Munda, New Georgia. How can I obtain copy of the picture of Gehring and Ross for my publication and consent. I would like to hear any fedback regarding this subject. By the way, Oct.26th is my birthday, this is one of the best presents ever!

  • Thank you for your comments Raymond and especially for the interesting information on Father Neil Doyle who will be a subject of one of my future posts. I will try to find where I got the picture from. I recall it took some doing. Unfortunately I have no rights to it, but I will attempt to locate the original source and post it here.

  • Thank you for replying. I am looking forward to reading your article on Father Doyle. If you haven’t researched the Archdiocese of Hartford you might consider a inquirey. Sister Irene Fortier was kind enough to send me some material on Father Doyle back in 1995. This event remained forever etched in my Dad’s memory and although it was difficult, I did eventually hear his side of the story. I have some photos of a Chatholic Chaplain saying mass inside a tent on Guadalcanal. This was before the Natives built and dedicated the chapel at the cemetery in March of ’43’. I would like to identify the Chaplain in my photos although I know there were many men of the cloth serving with different outfits. Perhaps it may be John F. Culliton,John P. Mahoney, Bishop Aubin, John P. Daly, Thomas O’Malley just to name a few who were on the island at the time. I don’t believe it is Father Gehring. If I can be of any help let please let me know. You had mentioned that you knew a Methodist Minister who was a medic on Guadalcanal. Would it be possible to forward my information regarding the 52nd Field Hospital? The army took over the Marines field hospital “C-1” after it arrived in Nov ’42’ and treated the sick and wounded from all branches of the military until evacuation was possible. I would love to hear from him.

  • Has anyone mentioned Marine Chaplain “Padre” Tom Reardon? I have gorgeous photos and article about his time at Guadalcanal. He went in with the first wave of Marines and eventually contracted malaria and left the island unconcious, before recovering in California. He is the PADRE showcased in the book and motion picutre “Guadalcanal Diary.” He was my dad’s first cousin and had an accomplished life post-war, and is still honored each year with an award at the Seton Hall University School of Law. The photos I have of him saying mass on the island are spectacular.

  • Great information. I too have been collecting informatoin on the 214th Coastal Artillery (AA)regiment, attached to the Americal Division on January 1943 on Guadalcanal. My father s/sgt Robert Burns served with the HQ Battery, 2nd Battalion of the 214th CA (AA). The unit Chaplain’s name was J.F. O’Connell, he may appear in the March 1943 photo mentioned above on Guadalcanal. I would appreciate any information you can provide for this period on Guadalcanal.

  • If I come across any additional information Robert, I will pass it on to you.

  • Tom, I will have to make time to do a post on the remarkable Father Tom Reardon.

  • What a terrific story – thank you. I visited Guadalcanal about 30 times in my 5 years as the Catholic Police Chaplain with RAMSI 2004>2009. In 2006 we blessed a beautiful thached roof open sided chapel overlooking the Red Beach landing zone, where ironically RAMSI came ashore in 2003. From the altar you can look out across the Channel toward the Florida Islands and Tulagi. Conducting services there each Sunday is alive with the spirit of all the men who were killed in ’42 & ’43. I always offer prayers for the thousands who died right here in this area – Tenaru is a few miles away – you can hear the waters lapping on the beach from the chapel, and Savo Island is just around the corner to the left. If you want to visit this beautiful memorial chapel you’d have to request permission at the security gate of the RAMSI compound, called Guadalcanal Beach Resort [GBR]. The Australian Government through RAMSI largly funded the chapel with its heavy wooden pews, altar, chairs and large Christian cross prominent. Thanks again for enshrining the stories in our memories. Blessings, Rev Mick O’Donnell, former Australian Federal Police Chaplain

  • Thank you Father!

  • Here is a letter from Padre Thomas M Reardon to his sister Mary Reardon (who was Sister Margaret Thomas, Sisters of Charity) dated August 6, 1942 (the original letter is in very good condition in a scrapbook page.
    I was born 17 years later TO THE DAY and named for him: Thomas Matthew Looney. Here is his letter written on the eve of battle.

    Dear Mary,

    Remember me, your brother. I used to say, “join the convent and see the world.” Well, you can change it—join the Marines and see the world. I hope you are well and taking good care of yourself. Regards to Sister Rosalie.
    We are on the eve of battle Mary. We have full expectations of licking the enemy. All of the boys are ready! Confessions conversions communions are a big part of my life with the boys.
    My life has been hidden from you so I wouldn’t have you worry about me. You know how much I love you and how proud I’ve always been of you. Both of us can be so thankful for such a grand Mom and Pop and cousins at 276. I know your prayers follow me. Don’t worry about me—I have a job to do and am proud to be with the boys. I feel that all your prayers at home will protect me. Remember Mary your brother loves you very much too much that you should worry about me. Together as grateful children of good parents we place ourselves in the arms of Jesus for his love and consolation. Adieu–God Bless You Fr. Tom

  • Where is the best place for me to place Padre Tom Reardon’s war papers, etc.? Marine Corps Museum?

  • That is some letter Tom. I would suggest the Marine Corps Recruit Depot Museum in San Diego:

    http://www.platoonphoto.com/dayhall/index.html

  • I discovered this item online and thought it would be of interest regarding Msgr. Reardon

    Chaplain Heroes

    Chalice of Rev. Thomas M. Reardon, U.S.N.R. (1909- 1987)
    1934
    silver and gold plated
    Gift of the Reardon Family to the Archives of the Archdiocese of Newark, Seton Hall University
    Thomas M. Reardon (1909-1987) was ordained a priest of the Diocese of Newark in 1934. In 1941, before Pearl Harbor, he entered the United States Navy as a chaplain, volunteering for service with the United States Marine Corps. He was the first chaplain to go ashore with the Marines at Guadalcanal. His exploits were featured in the book and film, ?Guadalcanal Diary,? with actor Preston Foster in the leading role. Monsignor Reardon later served as Regent of the School of Law of Seton Hall University and Pastor of Sacred Heart Parish, Bloomfield, NJ.

    Inscribed ?In Memory of My Parents Thomas and Mary Reardon Chalice used at Guadalcanal Aug. 8th- Dec.2nd, 1942.? This chalice was part of Father Reardon?s ?Mass Kit,? and was used by him during the Battle of Guadalcanal.

  • Thank you Tom. Great info.

Magnificent

Monday, October 26, AD 2009

The song is called Magnificent by the musical group U2.  It was a minor hit in both the United Kingdom and the United States in A.D. 2009 (and a major hit in Greece).

Some entrepreneurial YouTuber recreated the music video and turned it into a pretty decent contemporary ‘Christian’ music video.  The music video now celebrates the Triune God, the Eucharist, of course the love of God all coupled within a strong Pro-Life message.  There’s even a guest appearance of His Holiness, Pope Benedict XVI!

(Biretta Tip: Meg)

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8 Responses to Magnificent

  • Thanks Tito, that was awesome.

    I suspect a couple of scenes from Godzone.

    The budding tree fern – known as pikopiko – from which the ensignia, the koru, is designed – the ensignia on Air New Zealand aircraft, amonst other things.
    And secondly, the huge tree. I think it is a photo of our two thousand year old kauri tree – known to the maori as Tanemahuta – the “god” – or old man , of the forest, situated in the Waiapu forest in Northland, NZ. This tree was just a seedling when Christ was born.
    Thanks.

  • Don the Kiwi,

    Thanks for explaining some of those scenes from the music video.

    You live in a beautiful country.

    By the way the name of the Waiapu forest is very similar to Hawaiian. Are Maori of Polynesian descent? I grew up in Hawaii and I recognize the word structure of many of the Maori words and they are strikingly similar to Hawaiian!

  • Isn’t Bono, U2’s lead singer, Catholic?

    I have caught him several times wearing a rosary around his neck during a concert or other public performance.

  • Hi Tito.

    Yes, Maori are Polynesian. They call themselves “Te Maori” which simply means “the people”.
    Go to Wikipedia or google, insert “Polynesian Triangle”. This is a vast area of the Pacific, drawing lines from NZ in the Sth. west, to Hawaii in the North, and Easter Island in the Sth.East. Maori populated all these islands, and those in between – Tonga, Saomoa,Cook Is., Tahiti etc. They were amazing navigators. NZ was settled by maori from around the 8th century AD, in large ocean going canoes – two lashed together forming catamarans – the bulk of them arrived in 12th and 13th centuries.
    e.g. the Takatimu canoe – or “waka” the maori word – which landed here at Tauranga in the Bay of Plenty, left Takatimu beach on the island of Rarotonga in the Cook Islands, probably in the 12th.century. A young maori guy who worked for me, his tribe have in their verbal history the canoe leaving Takatimu beach. About ten years ago he went over to Rarotonga – the people there (who also call themselves “Te Maori”) recounted virtually the same story in their verbal history. He met all his relatives. Maori have a strong family association – they know their family history – or “whakapapa” – very well ; the old ones teach it to the young ones still. Maori culture is very strong and has undergone a revival over the past 50 years, to the extent that now, we use the maori language in some of our prayers at Mass – especially the Sign of the Cross.
    I was in Hawaii in 2002 – spent a week on Oahu, mainly in Honolulu. I also noticed the similarity in the languages. Its interesting, that before Europeans “discovered” the Pacific, a maori from NZ could have gone to Tahiti (whence Hawaii was populated) or Hawaii, and would have been understood. (provided they didn’t eat him first 😉

  • Not sure about the accuracy, but I read somewhere this summer that “Magnificent” is based on the Magnificat…sure can make the heart swell the same way!

  • I was wondering if it was a play on words done by the songwriter regarding Magnificat and Magnificent.

  • It was a minor hit in both the United Kingdom and the United States in A.D. 2009 (and a major hit in Greece).

    Your tone here suggests that you are now approaching blogging as a sort of time capsule, speaking to aliens from the future. Why?

  • Michael,

    Illegal or legal aliens?

Church and Health Care

Sunday, October 25, AD 2009

I have been on the sidelines in the huge health care debate, I find so many good and bad effects in all the proposals I have seen up to now. The first thing to note is that I am swamped by health care bills- one-third of my gross income goes straight to United Health, and then add in co-pays, and some recent Mayo Clinic extra’s, and you get the idea- “Help!”.  I can see how many good people with fulltime jobs and HMO health insurance coverage, are still at risk of bankruptcy if they or their kids get struck down with anything approaching serious or chronic medically.

The problem is compounded by the very real situation of how almost all of us are in some or a lot of danger when it comes to being laid-off from that full-time work- and many Catholics like myself- have wives that are home by choice to better nurture our kids. Ugh! Lose your job, lose your insurance or pay for COBRA which you can’t afford because you don’t have a job- Double Ugh!

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9 Responses to Church and Health Care

  • That is a really interesting idea.

    The K of C has developed a remarkable life insurance program that strikes me as a reasonable model for your idea. Add to your idea the existence of so many hospitals, hospices, facilities for the aged, and counseling centers and you have a significant start already.

    Hmmm…

  • I would favor insurance being totally divorced from employment. With that in place, there could be other ideas at work. It could be a part of severence if laid off. It could be included in unemployment insurance by the government so that you wouldn’t lose it between jobs.

  • You miss an important point. The bishops want greater government involvement in health care so they can back out of it and spend less money and resources on it themselves – and if the names and identity of “Catholic” is still attached, all the better. They don’t *want* to be more involved. It’s expensive and bothersome and a liability.

    Bishops are not go-getters and innovators. They are protecters and retreaters.

  • Surely much confusion would be cleared away were one to refer to the proposals as “insurance for health care”.

    It is about money, not about health care.

    Where are the provisions for new hospitals, new medical schools,more doctors, more nurses. Nowhere.

    And the efforts to control liability suits have gone nowhere. The trial lawyers are among the biggest donors to the Democratic Party.

    I am uncertain that our bishops should be involved. They can barely control “their” own efforts. Consider the years of donating to such outfits as ACORN. And Catholic Charities is [rightfully] spurned by parishes throughout the country.

  • Mark,

    You have a good point about the bishops — but why should the bishops be the ones behind it? Why not a lay initiative? Why not expand the KoC program to be open (for only slightly higher fees) to non-Knights? Or why not start an entirely new program on our own?

    The trick is to get a handful of laypeople with the capital and the know-how to get it done. Any takers?

  • P.S. I know the Christian Brothers run an insurance-type thing for a number of religious congregations. Maybe we should look at them, too, to see what the possibilities are.

  • “Big gov” vs “Big HMO’s” is a HUGE misunderstanding. The HMO was forced on America BY the US Congress.

    I think focusing on “ObamaCare” is not only foolish, but hands the victory over without contest. All argument about it has focused on public funding of abortion and euthanasia.

    The reality is that any kind of a government run system will make not only health insurance worse, but health care overall worse. America’s health care system is the envy of the world.

    The focus on abortion funding amounts to arguing over whether we should gut the best health care system in the world WITH abortion funding or WITHOUT it.

    That said, yes, health insurance SHOULD be divorced from employment, which is yet another reason government should be forced to stay out of it entirely.

    Government regulation is the entire reason that health insurance is employer based, and the reason that it is nearly impossible for people to find & get decent health insurance on their own.

    The root of the problems we see today are based in the fact that health care costs are ever increasing, while the “cure” is always new ways to try and hide the cost. There are a few alternative health plans out there (like that would actually start addressing some of the core problems that drive up the cost of health care, such as H.R. 3400.

    That’s not the only alternative bill out there, either. There have been more than 2 DOZEN health care proposals made in Congress & the Senate, all of which have been repeatedly buried because they have been Republican proposals that would not ruin the health care system in America by nationalizing it.

    Here are just a few:
    H.R. 77, H.R. 270, H.R. 502, H.R. 1086, H.R. 1118, H.R. 1441, H.R. 1468, H.R. 1658, H.R. 1891, H.R. 2520, H.R. 2607, H.R. 2785, H.R. 2786, H.R. 2787, H.R. 3356, H.R. 3372, H.R. 3400, H.R. 3454, …….

  • The idea of an organizational (Catholic Church) based insurance entity is very appealing to me as it could answer both the availability and affordability problems with health care today. Additionally, It could be a model of non-profit status and could lower administrative costs significantly if it were really treated as a new way of doing health care insurance.

    The availability solution could be built into the plan’s charter with no pre-existing exclusion and open enrollment.

    How it charges for coverage could also improve availability and level the playing field for individual buyers with group buyers. For example, right now groups are usually priced by the major health care companies on the basis of an employee census as to age. Then the health care company may apply certain actuarial credits to reflect wellness programs, etc. or in some cases just to be competitive. The rate then is averaged and the 25 year old pays the same as the 62 year old in terms of what comes out of their pay. If the same 25 year old got individual coverage they would pay probably 10% of what the 64 year old pays. The new group could work the same way as a large group plan works now and eliminate or ameliorate the built in old age “tax” of individual coverage. Just as an aside, this may seem unfair to the 25 year old, but they will reap the benefits as they age much like social security.

    More importantly non-profit status would allow cost savings and with a new entity costs could be cut significantly with real simplification of contracts and no or little paperwork. As it grows in size it would be able to really negotiate with providers to lower costs which are currently sacred cows to government (because of lobbying) and major health companies because of kickbacks and deals (sorry if it sounds paranoid, but it is real life). An example would be prescription drug costs – if Canada can do it the new group should be able to also if it can stay independent.
    THE OTHER SIDE
    Unfortunately, there is a lot working against the idea. Some of the problems have been mentioned above as cultural within the church but there are some other things that could hurt on a macro basis.

    To be really effective and wring costs out of the system the current employer based system would have to be replaced largely with an individual based system. This creates some substantial problems as a large portion of the workforce is not going to take kindly to losing these benefits. Longer term this may become more viable as more and more employers are dropping or reducing benefits but the last holdouts may be the government sponsored autoworker unions.

    The current health insurance companies may not be overjoyed at this prospect either. At first the new group would probably have to use the current markets unless they are capitalized in some different form and can work out their own discounts with healthcare providers. Eventually, though, they will know that they are going to be removed from the equation. I suspect they will put up many roadblocks.

    The government could also be a major hurdle as there could be some definite constraints based on the “not invented here” concept. We’ve seen how this works when government forms an insurance carrier and does not allow competition such as Workers Compensation Insurance in several states such as Ohio.

    To be really effective there would also have to be a few other things that may only be able to come from government such as mandatory coverage and Tort Reform (assuming this can be done without being overturned by the Supreme Court). Additionally, regulations would have to be changed to allow for interstate operations and possibly establishment of specialized insurance entities.

    Overall, I like the idea and it is something that I have suggested before although not in the context of a faith based group. It is a major alternative to government plans and could eliminate much of the inflated medical costs that are overburdening us now. Real life, though, is that it has some significant hurdles and few real advocates.

  • Thanks Paul for the detailed consideration- I am hoping against hope that instead of having our church and the bishops taking a position of negativity toward the inevitable government “reform” of health care coverage, we should take the bull by the horns and provide an alternative that doesn’t require government takeovers or bow to the powerful private for-profit interests – you overcome evil with good, not mere rhetorical complaint.

Chivalry: A Personal Definition

Sunday, October 25, AD 2009

Chivalry to me is the call for men/boys to respect women/girls even if they apparently don’t respect themselves, or even aggressively market themselves as mere sex objects. The visual hardwiring for males is tough to short-circuit since it is there for some very excellent reasons- but a boy in-training to become a good man, must develop the capacity to say “No” the same as for the girls- and he must learn to divert his eyes rather than feasting on the nearly ubiquitous female forms in various stages of undress parading by our senses. It is no wonder that St.Paul said it was better to marry than to burn, and Jesus laid out some very high standards when He said that lusting for a woman in your mind was adultery- pretty clear advice from someone whose opinions form my own.

I know that girls who don’t have close and affectionate relationships with their own fathers will act out sexually at earlier ages to try to fill in a spiritual hole in their hearts. I hope that with my own girls I can reinforce their beauty and worth in the world by showering them with my attentions, my hugs and kisses, and all the verbal and non-verbal affirmations of their excellence and my love for them- with the added bonus of giving all praise and glory to God for them as gifts to me and their mother and the world. They should never have to feel that they “need” some sexually-charged teen to give them the idea that they are special and deserve physical and spiritual affection from a male in their life. I hope and pray that this gives them some invisible support to make the correct choice to wait until marriage for the very special gift of their physical selves to another.

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6 Responses to Chivalry: A Personal Definition

  • I’m also under the impression that how the father treats his wife affects the perception of young little boys and girls. Especially when they mature themselves, they mimic, imitate, and follow many of the same traits and behaviors their parents act out towards each other when they have spouses of their own.

  • I like your definition, but why do you subjectivize it? Why is it “chivalry … to you”? Why isn’t it just chivalry?

  • Zach-
    Because too many folks have re-defined “chivalry” for their personal use, meaning everything from “oppressing women” through “treat women like smaller, weaker men” and up to more sane definitions.

  • It is a “personal” definition in the sense that I take what I know about chivalry and describe it in my own words and way. Additionally, I add some personal detail by bringing it home to my own relationship with my daughters- so I am not saying that one can view chivalry apart from it’s classic definition- but in application to modern society and one’s own family experiences, there is bound to be some individual touches in the description of one’s personal definition.

  • “Chivalry to me is the call for men/boys to respect women/girls even if they apparently don’t respect themselves…”–Tim Shipe

    …or men and boys.

    Thanks, Mr. Shipe, for re-affirming that the expression “male chivalry” is redundant. And oh, does a female counterpart to chivalry even exist?

  • I think it’d be “polite.” Possibly “being a lady” or “decent.”

    I can think of a lot of examples of things that violate it– from false rape accusations through chewing someone out for holding the door, all the way up to demanding concessions for being female while demanding that everyone ignore that fact….

And So It Begins

Sunday, October 25, AD 2009

John HindThe Anglican Bishop of Chichester John Hind has announced that he is considering converting to Catholicism based on the Anglican initiative of Pope Benedict.  This is a shocker.  He is one of the senior bishops of the Anglican Church and not previously identified with Anglicans who wished to break away from the Anglican Church.

The Rt Rev John Broadhurst, the Bishop of Fulham, even claimed that “the Anglican experiment is over”. He said it has been shown to be powerless to cope with the crises over gays and women bishops.

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11 Responses to And So It Begins

  • I think this is amazing.

    What a beautiful thing to be able to witness on this Earth.

  • Perhaps the 21st century will be the century of Christian re-unification, as Pope John Paul II prayed it would be.

  • This is wonderful news and it will be good.

    Of course, re-unification also makes for only one target for the anti-Christians. Although, a cord is easily ripped, but a woven bundle of cords is far stronger.

  • Very interesting development. What would he mean by “his previous ministry being recognized”?

  • I’m not sure. If he wants to be ordained as a Catholic priest there should be no problem with that. I can imagine him also as one of the first Ordinaries of the Anglican Rite. Since he is married, being a Bishop would be impossible under what Pope Benedict has proposed.

  • Why is there so little [if any] discussion about religion in all these reports? Celibacy, married bishops, active homosexuals, women priests and bishops – but nothing about what were considered the major sticking points – the Real Presence [denial of which “turned a sacrament into a ceremony”] – Infallibility [without which each man had to fabricate his own creed], and such matters.

    It will be a great hardship for many of the Anglican / Episcopalian clergy to give up their careers. Let us hope it is not for negative reasons but rather for positive reasons.

  • G-
    The short answer is that theologically the debate would be over; they return to Rome by accepting the Catechesis of the Catholic Church – lock, stock and barrel.

    The missing link in your question may be the fact that the Church of England has traditionally had 2 wings: Low and High church; a simple definition might be more protestant/calvinist (low) less protestant/lutheran-ish (high). In the early-mid 1800’s a third wing evolved, Anglo-catholic.

    The Anglo-Catholics rose to prominence under the famous leadership of Pusey and Newman. The simplest way to put it would be thus: they advocated a return to the original Anglicanism of Henry VIII… that is, an English Catholic Church that had all the doctrine and continuity of the catholic tradition off of which the English branch split. Pusey remained Anglican under this rubric, while Newman followed his conscience and reason back to full communion with Rome.

    Benedict’s offer appeals to the Puseyites of the Anglican Church… those who have already accepted the “c”atholic tradition, but for varied (usually cultural) reasons were unable/unwilling to “pope.”

    That is why there is little discussion of fundamental theology, since most of the impediments are cultural and not theological.

    Perhaps the best book written on Newman and the Oxford Movement (Anglo-catholicism) is Marvin O’Connell’s _The Oxford Conspirators_ if you are interested in more.

  • Marchmaine,

    Thanks for that bit of history!

    And the book recommendation.

  • Ironic, isn’t it, that this good news follows the post about the English and Welsh Martyrs? Methinks the Lord’s work is keeping the Martyrs very busy these days,…,:-)

  • Oops, scratch that “are” in the last sentence of my post.

    (My typos always jump right out at me the second I click on “submit comment.”)

  • It struck me as quite odd Donna when I posted these on Sunday Donna! I do think there is much joy in Heaven over this move by our Pope.

Jesu, Jesu, Jesu, Have Mercy on Me

Sunday, October 25, AD 2009

Today is the feast day of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales, canonized by Pope Paul VI on October 25, 1970.  These very brave men and women were martyred for the True Faith in England and Wales between 1535 and 1679, and they are representative of hundreds of Catholics in these countries who went to their death rather than to renounce their Catholicism.

John Pridmore, a reformed gangster from England, talks elquently about Saint Margaret Clitherow in the above video, and her life is typical of these brave champions of Christ.

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2 Responses to Jesu, Jesu, Jesu, Have Mercy on Me

  • Thanks for this post.
    Interesting that you should post this about St.Margaret Clitherow, Don.
    An ancestor of mine through my mother’s family line, by name William Nicholson (1816 – 1888) wrote a book about her. Some of our Nicholson relatives, who live I think in Portland, Oregon, researched and wrote a Nicholson Family Anthology back in the 1960’s and 70’s.

    I quote sections from this anthology.

    “William Nicholson studied the law, probably at his father’s office, and for a time followed the profession of solicitor in Warrington. The main direction of his contemplations, however, seem to have centred about religious thought. Like other menbers of his family, he was a communicant of the Church of England until about 1848…….
    William Nicholson participated in the Tractarian or Oxford Movement in England, and in 1848 or 1849 converted to Roman Catholicism. Dedicating his well-directed energy to his new faith, he rapidly rose to prominence among English Catholics…….most of his descendants became communicants of the Roman Catholic Church.
    For a now unknown reason, William Nicholson became interested in the story of Margaret Clitherow, often referred to as “The Pearl of York”.In the twentieth century she was canonised a saint. Born about 1556, Margaret (Middleton) Clitherow converted to Catholicism after her marriage to John Clitherow, who was a protestant, but from a Catholic family. She soon became an outspoken Catholic in York, providing for Catholic educators for her children and giving shelter to priests. Disturbed by the persistence of Catholicism in Yorkshire, the English government attempted to eradicate the faith by taking strong measures against English Catholics. On 25th March 1586 Margaret Clitherow was martyred in this purge.
    Her confessor John Mush wrote a contemporary memoir. The York Bar Convent obtained a copy of a manuscript made by Robert Setgrave in 1654 of John Mush’s work. Using this manuscript William Nicholson edited the work and published for the first time from a manuscript “The Life and Death of Margaret Clitherow, the Martyr of York.” The 215 page work was printed by Richardson & Son in London in 1849. The work was dedicated to the Earl of Shrewsbury, a leading Catholic layman of the time, with a letter of approbation from Bishop William Bewrnard Ullathorne, who worked indefatigably to restor Roman Catholicism as a prominent Church in England.”

    Thus endeth the lesson 🙂

    My mother has had a devotion to St.Margaret Clitherow for as long as I can remember, and it is from this family line that we are Catholic.

    Thanks.

  • It is truly a small world Don! Saint Margaret Clitherow is an example of Catholic courage and fortitude for us all.

Father Edward Hinds Found Slain In Rectory

Saturday, October 24, AD 2009

Father Edward “Ed” Hinds, the pastor of Saint Patrick Church in Chatham, New Jersey, was found slain early Friday Fr. Edward Hinesmorning by parishioners in the rectory when he failed to celebrate the 8:00am Mass.

This morning there was a congregation of roughly 300 parishioners that attended the 8:00 am Mass the day after the slaying.  It was a somber and quiet mood as the parish remembered their dear priest who was the only pastor at the church and he also worked at the parish school.

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11 Responses to Father Edward Hinds Found Slain In Rectory

  • May he now be enjoying the Beatific Vision.

  • When I heard this I was saddenned. Still puzzled as to why.

  • I’m puzzled as well, but I’m sure the details will come out.

    For whatever reason, the grisly death of Fr. Hines, even though I don’t know him, bothers me greatly.

  • Why? I’ll tell you why: because our society is hosed, that’s why! How many generations of children have been raised in Liberal relativism? How many millions of children have grown into adults that have no sense of “right” and “wrong”, let alone enough self-control to *not* throw a hissy fit whenever they don’t get their way??

    Sadly these hissy fits can end with the blade of a knife!

    I’m not one bit surprised that some dude hacked Father to death over an argument. Just look at how people behave at checkout counters and while driving!! We live in a society filled with adult spoiled brats! We can’t even have a grownup liturgy at Mass ~ what makes us think we can have grownup responses to “No” ???

  • Whatever the circumstances, this is very sad; perhaps a commentary on our society.
    In any event, may our God have mercy on Fr. Hinds and grant him the fulness of His salvation, acornding to the promises of Christ.

  • I think of the murderer’s children in these sins. Murder by career criminals is not as depressing as murder by a family man (two young children)who held one job at the parish for 17 years straight where his daughter still attends elementary school. The priest was there 6 years. This could have been a complex rather than simple temptation from the devil involving a slowly growing sinful temper over differences between the two men. And a wife and two children now have a family disgraced for the rest of their lives even though they are innocent. And they have sudden economic trouble combined with the responsibility of visiting the father in jail forever. The children will question their own goodness for years to come; they will suspect their own tempers as murderous even in normal moments. Very awful. Satan is a billiard player who is never just sinking one ball at a time.

  • This is diabolical – meaning to divide.

    When we allow Satan to attack unity everyone is a victim – the murderer, the victim, the family, the parish, all of us.

    We need to reclaim the moral high ground. The only question is are we prepared for the carnage that always results when taking a hill, or are we more comfortable in lazy tyranny?

    The Pope has been warning us of the dictatorship of relativism and many of us are not listening.

    May God have mercy on all who are touched by this, especially Fr. Hines, the janitor who murdered him and the murderer’s family.

    This story just sucks.

  • How sad. I suppose a lot will come out about the janitor in the next few days.

  • Coffee Catholic,

    Your post is deeply disturbing. You know nothing of either of these men or what happened to make the janitor snap and perform the vicious, horrendous act that has ruined so many lives.

    This “dude” is a father, a husband, and -was- a respected and loved member of the church, the school and the community for over 17 years. Tragedy is not reconciled by blame or a biting, uninformed analysis. This murder is something everyone is painfully trying to make sense of. Both of these men were loved.

    All human beings can not be lumped into one compact ball that is then cut down the middle, dividing good and evil into two neat sections. God has nothing to do with this.

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Year In Review Of The American Catholic

Saturday, October 24, AD 2009

We here at the American Catholic are celebrating our one year anniversary by reflecting on our favorite posts of the last 12 months.

Today it is my turn to contribute my favorite postings.

Enjoy!

What Is An American Catholic – Zach

The Scary Thing Is: We Really Mean It – DarwinCatholic

Fr. Emery of the 10th Tennessee Regiment – Donald McClarey

Being Reasonable Doesn’t Always Work – Chris Burgwald

Moloch: A Call for a More Sensitive Reappraisal – David Curp

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One Response to Year In Review Of The American Catholic

The Flames of Dissent and Discord

Saturday, October 24, AD 2009

Patrick Kennedy

Politicians make asinine statements all the time, but sometimes there is one that stands out from the crowd for its sheer cluelessness, duplicity and perversity.  Patrick Kennedy, yep, one of Teddy Kennedy’s sons, a Democrat member of Congress from Rhode Island, lambasted the Church for not falling into line behind ObamaCare. Here is a statement that he made  to CNSNews.

“I can’t understand for the life of me how the Catholic Church could be against the biggest social justice issue of our time, where the very dignity of the human person is being respected by the fact that we’re caring and giving health care to the human person–that right now we have 50 million people who are uninsured,” Kennedy told CNSNews.com when asked about a letter the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) had sent to members of Congress stating the bishops’ position on abortion funding in the health-care bill.

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9 Responses to The Flames of Dissent and Discord

The British Grenadiers

Saturday, October 24, AD 2009

Something for the weekend.   I have always found this tune to be catchy, even though more than a few of my ancestors fought against British Grenadiers!  In the Seventeenth and early Eighteenth centuries a grenadier was a soldier who carried little bombs, think stereotypical black anarchist bombs, and threw them at enemy positions, often in sieges.  The bombs eventually fell out of military use, until they were revived in the hand grenades of the Twentieth century.  However grenadiers,  the tallest and strongest men in a regiment, were still usually grouped together into an elite company and were often held in reserve until their use was needed to turn the tide of a battle.  Whole regiments of grenadiers, most notably in the Royal Army the Grenadier Guards, were sometimes formed.    The song The British Grenadiers is a fitting tribute to those men who were often involved in fighting of the most desperate sort.

Some talk of Alexander, and some of Hercules
Of Hector and Lysander, and such great names as these.
But of all the world’s great heroes, there’s none that can compare.
With a tow, row, row, row, row, row, to the British Grenadiers.

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8 Responses to The British Grenadiers

  • ..and I was able to sing it to my puzzled kids- thanks to second hand music books that cluttered our ‘piano room’ growing up. (Piano room where all 10 of us practiced before/after school until passing ‘gr.8’ ). We had good food and piano lessons , not clothes or gadgets. Long term health and joy!

  • When I was singing it this morning I was shushed by my daughter! Nothing unusual in that! She views Dad’s singing voice as a crime against humanity!

  • Ever since I saw Barry Lyndon, I’ve liked this Prussian military march:

    [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PcUR6y6Kmkk&hl=en&fs=1&]

  • You should keep an eye out for this game Joe that should be released before the end of the year. It should be filled with Eighteenth Century Prussian marches.

    http://www.ageod-forum.com/showthread.php?t=14064

    Ironically it is a French company doing this, AGEOD, one of the best makers of historical grand strategy computer games.

  • Then there is this Russian military march, appropriated by the Soviets but written before the revolution for the Tsar’s army.

    [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DMNpW1TtoY4&hl=en&fs=1&]

  • Chesterton used the lyrics of The British Grenadiers to argue that England was culturally a Mediterranean country. A really popular song would refer to classical heroes and mythology rather than the Nordic myths fashionable among the intelligentsia of his day.

    And, FWIW, I believe the British Grenadiers were founded as a regiment in the Spanish Army of Flanders by Royalist exiles in Cromwell’s time.

  • I think Joe has been playing Empire: Total War 🙂
    The AGEOD game looks good as well.

    There isn’t a much more inspiring military march than this one although the prussan one comes close. Funny how music could make men march in rank and file towards other men who were shooting at them.

Installation Scene From Becket

Friday, October 23, AD 2009

In honor of the Anglican initiative of Pope Benedict this week, a reminder of the history of Catholic England, when Catholics were willing to stand against the State if need be to protect the Honor of God.   Becket (1964), although inheriting the historical howlers that existed in the play, and were known by the playwright Jean Anouilh who wisely preferred a poetic story to prosaic fact,  (Becket was Norman not Saxon, Henry II was not a crowned juvenile delinquent, the armor, as is usual in medieval epics, is all wrong for the period, etc.), this classic film helped awaken in me a desire to learn about the history of the Church.  With masterful performances by Richard Burton as “the holy blessed martyr” and Peter O’Toole as Henry II, the film brought alive to me as a child the high Middle Ages.  The installation sequence brought home to me the important role of ceremony, tradition and symbolism in our Faith, a lesson I have never forgotten.

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5 Responses to Installation Scene From Becket

  • Watching the excommunication scene is still frightening to me. As it should be, I suppose. I would half expect a large chasm to open up under Lord Gilbert the moment the Archbishop snuffs out the candle.

  • That was a very good scene. My favorite line from the movie is uttered after Becket has announced he is appealing to the Pope and a Baron calls him a traitor and advances upon him with sword drawn. “Sheathe your sword, Morville, before you impale your soul upon it!”

  • Huh. I just realized that Peter O’Toole was Henry II twice. Too bad there’s no Eleanor of Aquitane cameo by Katherine Hepburn! 🙂

  • My forebears (Becketts) came from London. They owned a brickworks on the Thames. In 1970 I had a young englishman from London working for me when I lived in Rotorua – his father was a builder in London, and John Oakes worked with him – they used to buy Beckett’s bricks for their building work.
    My father tried to dig further back than the 17th.century, but ran out of time, and couldn’t afford to go back to London from here (NZ)
    So we don’t know whether or not our family line is the same as St.Thomas.

    But I claim it anyway 🙂

    Don Beckett.

  • This moment in history is not only significant with respect to the great matter of Catholic/Anglican reunification but also to vindicate those who were literally severely tortured to death at Tyburn (i.e., <a href='http://www.tyburnconvent.org.uk/home/martyrs.html'the 105 martyrs) several centuries ago and all subsequent English recusants who likewise suffered a similar fate; that these did not die in vain!

    From 1535 to 1681 Tyburn was transformed into a place of cruelty, torture and execution for men and women who suffered on Tyburn Tree for their religious belief. According to the laws of the land in force at that time, it became an act of high treason to be a Catholic priest, or to associate with Catholic priests. It was also legal treason to refuse to accept the King as “the only Supreme Head on earth of the Church of England”, in the reign of King Henry VIII from 1534 onwards. Under Queen Elizabeth I similar laws continued. Under Charles I and Charles II especially similar laws brought many Catholic priests to martyrdom on Tyburn Tree. The infamous Titus Oates Plot and the persecution following it from 1678 to 1681 was the final stage of this one hundred and fifty years of religious persecution against Catholics.

    These 105 Catholic Martyrs of Tyburn suffered death then, because they freely chose fidelity to the Bishop of Rome as the true Head of the Church on earth. They also suffered death at Tyburn because they were ‘Mass saying priests”‘ or helped such priests.

    In the words of one historical account, “To inflict the extremity of torture on a Catholic was the highest joy.”

    May these who have long since joined the Communion of Saints experience certain satisfaction at the prospect that those very elements which made what once was Catholic England are now rightly being recovered and its ancient patrimony restored.

    P.S. Anybody seen the miniseries entitled, “Augustine: The Decline of the Roman Empire”, which Pope Benedict XVI actually previewed in September where the Pope himself gave a positive review?

    If so, I’d be interested in knowing their personal opinion of it and the details of where and when they saw it. Thanks.

    Here’s a link to its Trailer:

Political Parties Must Stand For Something: Sarah Palin Endorses Doug Hoffman

Thursday, October 22, AD 2009

Sarah PalinIn the 23rd New York Congressional District special election, Sarah Palin has tonight endorsed the pro-life Doug Hoffman, running on the Conservative Party ticket, against Dede Scozzafava, the pro-abort leftist Republican, a race that I posted about here earlier in the week.  Sarah Palin’s statement is as follows:

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26 Responses to Political Parties Must Stand For Something: Sarah Palin Endorses Doug Hoffman

  • She is amazing.
    Guiliani,Romney,Huckabee,Pawlenty,Jindahl – have you nothing to say about this? Too risky to intervene in a congressional race?

  • Sarah’s appeal has been her genuineness from the beginning. Notice that it wasn’t until the psudo-Republican McCaine machine got hold of her that she started making mistakes.

    I doubt she’ll fall for that again.

    The current climate does not favor the over-reaching Demoncrats but the Republican’ts need to be wary because America doesn’t trust them either.

    Conservatives can take the party back and this move by Sarah may be the first national salvo in the fight.

    I just wish she’d come back to the Church of her baptism.

  • We shall see how this works out. It carries risk of course and I am not reaaly on board with the slamming of the GOP nominee in this case and espcially those that feel compeeled to support him

    I pretty much agree with the statements of Dan Riehl here

    “Scozzafava Candidacy: Not the Fault of DC GOP”

    http://pajamasmedia.com/blog/scozzafava-candidacy-not-the-fault-of-dc-gop/#

  • Palin is nothing but a pretty face on a hot body; that’s all.

    To capitalize on her political capital (when there is none, actually) is, quite simply, to play the fool.

  • “Palin is nothing but a pretty face on a hot body; that’s all.”

    You completely misread her e. Palin is a phenomenon in politics, the likes of which I have not seen since Ronald Reagan flew off into the sunset. The fact that a defeated vice presidential candidate and former governor has a national political network , constant media attention and the power from a facebook page to have a vast impact on our politics indicates that she is something new and different on the political scene. She is not a conventional politician, and she is about to blaze a new path to the White House. Sit back and prepare to be amazed.

  • Donald I think you are 100% correct. Of course, we don’t know what will happen, but her impact cannot be ignored.

    Americans are overwhelmingly fed up with business as usual, which is why someone with no experience, no accomplishments and a horrible ideology can win the White House based on unspecified change.

    People don’t want more of the same and Americans want someone who is a ‘regular’ person with a beleif in our common values: God, country, personal responsibility, community, small government, free enterprise.

    A candidate who is, well, candid and committed to authentic conservative principles will appeal to hard core conservatives, traditionalists, libertarians (most of them anyhow), anti-Communists and even traditional-minded liberals. Only the small lefty loonie minority in the White House now will show disdain.

    This is what propelled a former actor, union leader, ex-New Dealer and supporter of AuH20 to the White House and invented the Reagan Democrats. It will happen again. Is it Palin? Perhaps. If not, it will be someone else. But it is coming.

    I think McClarey is right, sit back and prepare to be amazed.

  • Ditto Tito… Go Palin Go!

  • To e. says, yes Sarah Paln is a pretty face, for 45 years old she has a hot body, but what you choose to ignore is that she has a political mind that will prove to be the brightest in our lifetime.

    First she has only been involved in politics for less than twelve years yeat she has gone up the ladder in record time, City Council, Mayor, Governor, VP candidate.

    She uses Facebook to bypass the Drive By Media and has more impact than any other political figure

    Her first Paid Speech garners $300,000 and is complimented by Wall Street Journal and even the New York Times as thoughtful, insightful and that the current administration could take a page in dealing with China

    She writes a 437 Book in less time that many authors could even come up with an outlineand it becomes # 1 within hours of a Title and date release. Unthinkable in the Publishing world.

    She endorses an unknown candidate in NY 23 and he garners $116,000 within one day and now hasan actual chance of winning the election.

    She challenges the GOP elities that politics as usual will not be tolerated in this election cycle, for the grassroots have spoken and they better head the message.

    All of this without campaign strategists, no poltical machine but just a belief that to serve is serve the people and therewishes. Palin has a motto ” Get out of the way I will do it”

    Enjoy the next three years for we will see a campaigne that will be in the record books for years to come and we will have a President that we will all be proud of.

  • For the comment that Sarah needs to come back to the church of her baptism, I pose the question should the church come back to its people?

    As a life long Catholic I have become dissappointed in how the Church has handled the Pedophile priest and now how there are dealing with illegal immigration? They encourage breaking the law for the ” Better Good” Are they any different than what the heads either political party do to there constituents on a daily basis?

    This is a case where separation of church and state is very appropriate1

  • “Palin is a phenomenon in politics, the likes of which I have not seen since Ronald Reagan flew off into the sunset. The fact that a defeated vice presidential candidate and former governor has a national political network , constant media attention and the power from a facebook page to have a vast impact on our politics indicates that she is something new and different on the political scene. She is not a conventional politician, and she is about to blaze a new path to the White House. Sit back and prepare to be amazed.”

    In polls, she loses to just about everyone. Her unfavorable rating even among Republicans is very high. Palin is popular like Rush Limbaugh is popular, i.e., not popular enough to be elected.

  • Another similarity with Reagan restrained radical. Prior to his victory in 1980 Reagan polled poorly in Presidential horse race polls. Even in 80, most of the polls showed the race dead even until the weekend before Reagan crushed Carter. Like Palin however, he had extremely dedicated supporters among the conservative base of the party, and a dedicated enthusiastic minority can often sway the outcome of an election. Like Reagan, Palin is always underestimated and that is almost always to a politician’s advantage.

  • it is amusing that so many of Palin’s supporters believe that she is poised for great things and that Democrats and liberals greatly fear her (which is why they attack her). Truth is, Palin is just another Joe the Plumber, one more bumper sticker populist for the under-informed and under-educated. A palin candidacy would be the greatest gift for the Democrats…the Democrats do not fear her, not one bit, she would hand them the most lopsided win in history. There are actually intelligent and knowledgable republicans out there – pick one.

  • Precisely what they said about Reagan, Shawn. “A washed up hack B actor.” “He is senile.” “We’ll beat him easily.” Clark Clifford, a fixture of the Democrat establishment in Washington for half a century, summed up this attitude when he referred to Reagan as “an amiable dunce”. Many Liberals rarely understand Conservatives in this country, and I thank God for their blindness and condescension.

  • Donald,

    It seems that many Republicans don’t get conservatives either.

    I expect to never be amazed by political pragmatists, although, it is particularly unnerving when it comes from people of faith.

    Why should we seek the pragmatic candidate rather than someone with conviction of principles?

    I am hearing many alleged pro-lifers stating that she is splitting the race in NY, etc. Why does Sarah get the blame? Why not correctly blame the supporter of child murder?

    Dismissing her is odd for anyone with true conservative values and it is particulary sickening by alleged pro-lifers and Christians, especially Catholics. She is taking a very pro-life stance and for that she should be applauded not derrided.

  • Funny for someone the Democrats supposedly don’t fear, they sure seem to go out of their way to express how much they don’t fear Palin every time her name is brought up. Me thinks they doth protest too much.

  • Excellent points Paul.

    I am not a registered Republican, but I’m all for a national Conservative Party. Though we may not get majorities in either House, we could certainly work with non-RINO-Republicans and Blue Dog Democrats to get legislation passed.

  • I don’t wish to digress too much from the focus of the actual topic of this column. But I am rather interested in the “RINO” and “DINO” labels.

    By all counts to a Democrat who agrees entirely with the platform, I’m a Democrat-In-Name-Only. But why should we have such rigid political orthodoxy?

    I’m not saying that a party should not have agreement on a fundamental vision and philosophy, or principles, which is necessary for unity. But if there is not room for disagreement on means to the same end, there is very little room for intellectual freedom and creativity that actually allows for constructive criticism from within the party and viable and practical solutions to problems we face as a society.

    If anything, we benefit from Democratic Senators like Ben Nelson who is opposed to the public option, who is opposed to the “opt out” compromise, and who most certainly will not vote for a health care reform bill with abortion in it. He is being attacked as a “fake” Democrat. I can’t see how such dissent is a bad thing — maybe because I’m pro-life?

    Perhaps, I am misunderstanding one’s definition of a “RINO” or “DINO.” Is it someone who is so antithetical to the whole platform that they belong in the other party? Can someone be pro-choice and completely conservative on everything else and not be a “RINO”?

    Sorry to divert to a tangent, but it is something I have always been confused about and quite obviously it relates to me since my political views cut across the political spectrum, unevenly at that.

  • Actually Eric, I don’t normally like the term RINO. Yes, moderate and left-leaning Republicans annoy me, but a political party is different from an ideological movement, therefore the term itself is problematic. The Republican party, while generally the home to conservatives, is not an ideological entity per se. There are of course party platforms, so political parties should have some kind of general outlook. But we don’t have to enforce complete orthodoxy on all issues.

    That being said, Dede Scozzafava isn’t even remotely Republican leaning in any meaningful sense of the term. At least Senators Collins and Snowe occasionally display backbones and ally themselves with conservatives on important issues. Scozzafava, however, is pro choice, pro gay marriage, pro stimulus, pro ACORN, etc. It is almost impossible to figure out how she is even remotely related to the Republican party. So she’s one of the unique cases where the RINO label is very apt.

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  • She’s pro-gun.
    Is she really that different from Schwarzenegger or Giuliani? Is she that far from Nixon, Ford, or Bush 41?

  • She’s pro-gun.

    Oh, the horror!

  • Pro-gun? Really. Who in their right mind is pro-gun. A gun is a tool, saying you are pro-gun is as stupid as saying your are pro-mop (unless its a Marxist mop:)). Big Tex is right that’s horrible – the Marxist mop, not the guns.

    She is pro gun-ownership rights, which is just a sadly needed reactionary defense of natural property rights.

    And of all of her positions that is a really lame one to point out. Anyone who is pro private property and is sane and rational will be pro gun-ownership, whether or not they shoot moose, or is that meese 🙂

  • I wasn’t going to reply but I just read this quote from a Hoffman volunteer in today’s Economist:

    Ms Johnson describes Ms Scozzafava as “practically a Democrat”, but does “give her credit for being pro-guns”.

    http://www.economist.com/world/unitedstates/displaystory.cfm?story_id=14753792

    American Knight, I suggest you call up the Hoffman office, ask for Ms. Johnson, and educated her on why she’s not in her “right mind” and that what she said was “stupid.”

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53-47

Thursday, October 22, AD 2009

reid-incompetenceFuture historians may mark this vote as the day Obamacare died.   Harry Reid was unable to have the senate invoke cloture and end debate on a bill which would dump 250 billion in medicare reimbursements over 10 years from the health care bill and throw it into the general budget deficit with no hint as to how this quarter of a trillion dollars would be paid for.  In order to invoke cloture Reid needed 60 votes, he got 47.  13 Democrats joined all 40 Republicans in refusing to invoke cloture.

The whole purpose of this shell game was to improve the image of the health care bill by reducing the cost by 250 billion dollars.  I guess the senators who voted against ending debate realize that most voters would be able to see through this inept attempt to reduce the cost by shuffling a mountain of red ink into the general deficit abyss.

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6 Responses to 53-47

  • Quack, I think, not cluck… and I pray you’re right.

  • Thank you Foxfier. I have made the necessary correction. Now, I trust, both Donald Duck and the Little Red Hen will not be outraged with me!

  • Last thing we need is someone showing up and accusing you of accusing O of being a coward, right? ;^p

  • I would never accuse our President of being a coward Foxfier. I am certain that he has the courage of Michelle’s convictions.

  • Things like this make you really wonder. Are they really this incompetent or are they simply blinded by their own arrogance or is it something more sinister?

    The behavior baffles me. It’s kind of like knowing what a sociopath/psychopath/borderline personality/malignant narccisist is and actually understanding them. The chasm is to wide.

    I hope that waddle grows to a full quack, cluck, whatever so long as he’s quiet and impotent. I suppose that comment makes me a racist, or is that specist – I’m confused. 🙂

  • No, you are definitely racist. hee hee hee LOL

It's A Depression, Thus Sayeth The Veep

Wednesday, October 21, AD 2009

During these dismal economic days, we can always rely upon the  comic stylings of Joe Biden to raise our morale, just as the American public during Depression I looked to the Three Stooges for comic relief.  I assume Jolly Joe in the above video was thinking of  the old Reagan line from Reagan’s 1980 campaign for President:  “A Recession is when your neighbor loses his job.  A Depression is when you lose your job.  A Recovery is when Jimmy Carter loses his!”  Needless to say, the brighter lights in the Administration were reaching for extra strength pain relief as they saw the human gaffe machine use the “D” word, especially since they have been attempting to convince a sceptical public that the recession  is ending.

What makes this especially hilarious is that Newsweek, the unofficial house organ of the Obama administration, ran a puff piece on Biden last week entitled “Why Joe is No Joke” .  Hint Joe, when you are a politician and one of the most sycophanic press journals on your side runs a story arguing that you are not a joke, that is most definitely not a good sign.

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13 Responses to It's A Depression, Thus Sayeth The Veep

  • “We can always rely upon the comic stylings of Joe Biden to raise our morale, just as the American public during Depression I looked to the Three Stooges for comic relief.”

    Remember a few months ago when we were speculating on who the Third Illinois Stooge might be to go with Blago and Burris? Looks like the great state of Delaware stepped up to fill the gap — thank you very much Delawareans 🙂

    Blago, Burris, and Biden…it even kinda rhymes with Moe, Larry, and Curly!

  • Wait, am I supposed to be tickled at Biden for actually slipping out the truth? It is a depression and its not going away. Man, I’d love it if the Administration actually admitted reality.

  • C’mon Anthony. ‘Not going away’ on what time scale?

    The decline in per capita income over the last year or so has been on the order of 4-5%. That during the period from the fall of 1929 to the spring of 1933 was on the order of 30%. We have a ways to go ‘ere we can be said to be suffering adjustments on the scale people did during the Depression.

    No one is certain at this point whether production levels have stabilized or whether there will be a secondary contraction brought on by renewed stress on the banks (as leases on commercial real estate contracted after 2003 expire) or by a currency crisis (given the ratio of public sector borrowing to domestic savings).

    The tax increases necessary to balance the public books will likely put a drag on economic growth for a couple of business cycles, even if nothing acutely disagreeable happens over that time. The situation is bad enough without overstating matters.

  • Nah. Its a depression.

  • Just another in a long line of VPs who were best kept a closet and brought out for state functions only.

  • I’m just waiting for him to mis-spell tomato during a photo-op with school children. LOL

    God bless our poor doofus Veep.

  • Ha! Loved this. Just wish the overall effects of this administration were half as funny and a billions times less scary. Hey you want to catch some frightening stuff Obama is up to, catch my post tomorrow. Are you aware of the “Climate Debt Treaty” Obama is scheduled to sign in Denmark next month? Effectively signing away our sovereignty as a free nation and subjugating it to the New World Order?

    Like you blog – I’ll be back.

    Marvin D Wilson

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  • Hi there, nice site with good info. I really like coming back here often. There’s only one thing that annoys me and that is the misfunctioning of comment posting. I usually get to 500 error page, and have to do the post twice.

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Much to the Chagrin of the Powers that be, the Tide is Further Turning Toward Catholicism Thanks to Traditional Minded Anglicans

Tuesday, October 20, AD 2009

The dream of orthodox minded Catholics and Anglican liberals came true on Tuesday, October 20, 2009 as the Vatican announced that traditional minded Anglicans, clergy included, would be welcomed into the Catholic Church with their own Anglican style rite (though not exactly a rite of their own.) The promise Jesus made that the Gates of Hell would not prevail against His Church is now once again being made manifest for those who chose to recognize it (Matthew 16:16-20.) What King Henry VIII started Pope John Paul II and Pope Benedict XVI have salvaged. The English and their former empire (if they wish) can return home again.

Since many conservatives may now leave, religious liberals too have high hopes as the worldwide Anglican Communion can possibly fulfill their wish of unbridled liberalism. However, it is becoming plain to see that it is for all intents and purposes the liberal’s wish is now turning into a death wish.  The irony of reading statements by traditional Anglicans thanking God for Pope Benedict’s statement coupled by liberal Catholic posters in the dissident National Catholic Reporter asking to be saved from Rome spoke volumes. Even with fawning mainstream media coverage, every liberal Protestant denomination has seen their numbers plummet in recent years, some as much as 50%, while Catholicism, with all the negative banner headlines, continues to grow around the world.

The Archbishop of Canterbury seems a truly tragic figure cut from a Shakespearean play trying to hold together what a murderous king wrought. It couldn’t be done and so we may now see the implosion of the Anglican Communion, especially in the only region that had any vibrancy, Africa. The African and Asian continents have long been the hope of the One True Church. Fortunately, the embers of truth can also be seen in North & South American seminaries and even in Europe, where the Faith had seemed all but dead.

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50 Responses to Much to the Chagrin of the Powers that be, the Tide is Further Turning Toward Catholicism Thanks to Traditional Minded Anglicans

  • Dave,

    Perhaps the future King of England will be relieved of this meddlesome title and realize that crossing the Tiber is his country’s best hope.

    Too many quotes to pull from a great article.

    King Henry VIII created this mess so as to satisfy his lust.

    We can see the many problems in todays society as we see our nation succumb to sex on demand. Where sex becomes our identity and all vices turned to virtue.

  • “King Henry VIII created this mess so as to satisfy his lust.”

    Actually, it was more about his desire for a legitimate male heir than anything else — he could “satisfy his lust” with any of his numerous mistresses whenever he pleased, but only a properly married wife and queen could give him an heir, which Catherine of Aragon was not able to do. In other words, it was more about his “right” to have exactly the kind of child he wanted (male) by any means necessary … hmmm, sound familiar?

    What if Henry and Catherine had been able to accept her infertility as God’s will for them, and fully embraced their only daughter Mary, or another relative, as a potential heir; or allowed the succession to pass to another noble family, placing their trust in God to protect the nation, rather than violate the law of His Church? Maybe things would have been less stable in the short term, but a lot of grief would have been avoided in the long term.

  • Elaine,

    You are correct!

    And how eerily similar it is in todays dark climate of secularism.

  • And to think the church’s detractors blast it for being so medieval when the secularists themselves seem to be eating the bitter fruits of ol’ King Henry XVIII. Kudos to Dave for a splendid article … loved the “Tortoise of Truth vs. Hare of Relativism” comment!

  • I became Catholic in 1998 when I was 23 and I was horrified by what I saw taking place within the Church and also outside of Holy Mother Church in society and other churches.

    I could never explain my yearning for the traditional Mass and the traditional ways ~ except to say that I, a young 20-something, yearned for a GROWNUP approach to the Faith. Seriously! All of this Liberal crap is so immature and childish and even the young Catholics of ten years ago and today just can’t stomach it.

    Now I’m just… shocked to the core!! I thought that this “dying” of the Christian faith was a bad thing, that this meant that Christianity was going to flicker out and pretty much die and we Christians that were left over would be a rarity.

    Now I see exactly what is going on and it’s so awesome! This death of all of these Reformation protest-churches (protestant!) is opening the door wide for the regrowth of the Catholic Faith all over the world!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Where I live, you can see how much Christianity has totally died a death ~ and I used to think, “What an spiritually sterile place I’ve come to.” But now I see that… “The harvest is plentiful but the laborers are few. Pray ye the Lord of the Harvest sends workers into his harvest…”

    The situation is not so wretched and hopeless after all!!!!!

  • A great, and might I say predictable 😉 article Dave.

    And I have been meaning to buy your book for ages.

    MUST – BUY – DAVE’S – BOOK !!!!

    God bless.

  • From another era ” The shot heard around the world”. Dave, you have not lost your ability and rhetoric to bring insight and hope to those who love our Church and its tenets and traditions. Boy is the tide ever turing. Those Catholics who have espoused relativism and have tried to change the foundation of the Rock must be in total shock. God Bless and long live Benedict XVI.

  • “The last four decades have seen liberal Christianity reach out to every sort of relativistic idea, whim and group. The western intellgentsia praised these efforts even as liberal churches emptied of their adherents.”

    Christians trying to change in order to satisfy agnostics and atheists is foreordained to end in spiritual death.

  • Once again Dave puts everything together perfectly! I am passing this on to the young person whom I am sponsoring in RCIA.

    Thanks again, Dave and commentators!

  • I’ll be very curious to see how the African Anglicans respond to this… they tend to be more evangelical (“low church”) than the TAC, and hence (presumably) less-likely to swim the Tiber, despite their “merely Christian” orthodoxy.

  • Elaine,

    You’re not quite correct.

    Actually, it was more about his desire for a legitimate male heir than anything else — he could “satisfy his lust” with any of his numerous mistresses whenever he pleased, but only a properly married wife and queen could give him an heir, which Catherine of Aragon was not able to do. In other words, it was more about his “right” to have exactly the kind of child he wanted (male) by any means necessary … hmmm, sound familiar?

    It has been noted by many that Henry’s romps with his mistresses likely caused Catherine’s inability to have a male heir. She wasn’t infertile; they simply had absurd infant mortality. What is that a symptom of? Syphilis. A sexually transmitted disease. Indeed, Henry satisfying his lust probably was at the heart of the whole thing.

  • I think the responses of people in the US like Mims are indicative of the evangelical Anglican reaction; to paraphrase, “it’s nice they agree with us the liberal Anglicans are bad, but we’re not gonna start worshiping no pope or Mary.”

  • Not to mention, as we know today, a male heir (or lack thereof) comes from the genes of the father, not the mother. So it was Henry’s fault he could not get a male heir.

  • Andy — you’re correct in saying Catherine wasn’t “infertile” in the strict sense; she got pregnant plenty of times, but only had one child live to adulthood, while all the rest were miscarried, stillborn, or died shortly after birth. And it’s quite probable that syphilis or some other STD contracted from Henry’s “romps with his mistresses” had something to do with it.

    However, Henry and Catherine themselves had no way of knowing that, so as far as Henry’s actual intentions were concerned, it was his determination to have a legitimate male heir that was the heart of “the king’s great matter.”

    Also, remember that Henry and Catherine’s one surviving child grew up to be known as “Bloody Mary” because of her counter-persecution of Protestants during her brief reign. Well, that would likely never have happened if Henry hadn’t treated her like dirt and tried to force her and her mother to give up their Catholic faith, and Mary to admit she was a “bastard,” after his marriage to Anne Boleyn. She might have been a really good queen if only she’d been treated with some respect in her younger years.

  • Elaine, Catherine wasn’t infertile. She got pregnant 4 or 5 times. Henry’s proable syphilys caused sickly children.

  • Kung would tool around the narrow streets of the Germany university town of Tubingen in his Porsche leaving the poor bicycling Father Ratzinger in the dust. Some forty years later, the Tortoise of Truth had passed the Hare of Relativism.

    I laughed out loud at this–a vivid image!

  • The irony of reading statements by traditional Anglicans thanking God for Pope Benedict’s statement coupled by liberal Catholic posters in the dissident National Catholic Reporter asking to be saved from Rome spoke volumes.

    Why can’t we simply do some sort of “Parish-Swap”, where we trade liberal Catholics for Conservative-minded Anglo-Catholics?

    That way, we not only welcome the traditionally-minded folks into the fold, we also do away with all the rubbish that is liberal Catholicism!

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  • Great news, great article. We need these people who love Our Lady, love a dignified liturgy and love the Pope. They will teach our liberals and the rest of us much.

  • I hate to be the one to rain on this parade but…

    1000 conservatives join the Church: Front-page news.
    1000 liberals leave the Church: Just another Monday.

    If it’s numbers you want to talk about, Catholicism isn’t doing too well. Catholics are leaving the Church just as fast as Anglicans are leaving theirs. If it were its own religion, ex-Catholics would make up the 2nd largest religion in the US. In my experience, the most common response to “What religion are you?” is “I was raised Catholic but…”

    I don’t think this “to hell with liberals” attitude is productive. There’s nothing wrong with reaching out with both hands to the right and to the left.

  • Actually Restrained Radical it is the other way around, the mainstream media loves to stick to the Church with breaking news headlines whenever something bad happens in the Church. However, did you notice any breaking news when something good happens i.e. the provisions Pope Benedict made for orthodox minded Anglicans? It isn’t so much reaching out to the left or the right that is the Church’s mission; it is to preach the truth of the Gospel of Christ, no matter how popular or unpopular it may be at any given time.

  • “There’s nothing wrong with reaching out with both hands to right and to the left.”

    How about this — why don’t those conservative Anglicans just remain with their coreligionists who have embraced homosexuality, woman priests, etc.

    They should, instead, reach out with both hands to those on their left and simply accept them and their beliefs, however wrong.

    The same with us Roman Catholics.

    We should reach out with both hands to those on the left, those who advocate abortion, those who support homosexuality, those who promote woman priests; and simply accomodate them and their beliefs, however wrong.

    Did not Christ preach in Matthew 18:17 that those who dissent from the Church are to be treated, not like a heathen or a publican, but as somebody whose errant beliefs we should accomodate?

  • “However, did you notice any breaking news when something good happens i.e. the provisions Pope Benedict made for orthodox minded Anglicans?”

    Front page of the New York Times.

    e,
    No doctrinal changes were made to accommodate the conservative Anglicans. I’m not advocating any of the following but here are some examples of what’s possible on the orthodox left: women deacons who marry and baptize, openly gay celibate priests, married priests and bishops, a more democratic election of bishops, radical liturgical reform (rock bands, dancing, etc.), a higher bar for just war, maybe some wiggle room on contraception, pushing for liberal causes like weapon bans, torture bans, more lenient sentencing, selective conscientious objector status, gays in the military, environmental protection, universal health care, minimum wage, unionization, world courts, etc.

  • Yeah — I’ll look forward to having Mass celebrated where in it, heavy metal bands perform, various break dancing takes place, and the Communion served is actually an Oreo cookie, with Elton John serving as its chief celebrant.

    Nice liberal utopia you have going there.

    Personally, I’d rather have a Church with a few, but very faithful, people (as even then Cardinal Ratzinger had once envisioned) as opposed to one entertaining the numerous masses, the majority of which yield to heretical beliefs/practices.

  • Restrained Radical, studies have shown that articles in the mainstream media’s newspapers and in their respctive network and cable news channels are terribly skewed against the Church. I would ask you to visit the Newsbusters site of April 2008 and see how television and the print media covered Pope Benedict’s visit to New York City. Listening to Katie Couric (and many others) beforehand, one would have thought Americans would greet the Holy Father with demonstrations, not the genuine admiration that was shown by those in the Big Apple and rarely discussed by those news organizations.

    Even the Anglican story of this week was hardly given a mention in most newspapers, TV network or cable news channels, a very strange development when one considers the fact that some Protestant commentators called it one of the biggest developments in the religious world since the Reformation.

  • “Even the Anglican story of this week was hardly given a mention in most newspapers, TV network or cable news channels, a very strange development when one considers the fact that some Protestant commentators called it one of the biggest developments in the religious world since the Reformation.”

    Front page of the NY Times, WSJ, Washington Post, and LA Times. That’s as mainstream as you can get. If you didn’t read about it in the MSM, I suggest you find better news sources.

    Judging by the web traffic, the Anglican news wasn’t very popular with readers. No surprise there. The Average Joe doesn’t care.

  • Restrained Radical thank you for proving my point, the truth is the truth whether it is popular with the mainstream media or not and the Average Joe or not. The plummeting liberal denominations wanted to be liked so much they tried to appeal to everyone and to paraphrase GK Chesterton ended up appealing to one one. When the faithful of these dying groups come to realize where the truth has always existed (the Catholic Church) they can’t wait to swim the Tiber.

  • Again I can’t believe I’m agreeing with the lower case vowel again.

    Restrained Radical,

    I would prefer quality over quantity any day of the week. A smaller more faithful Church would only feed my soul and bring me ever closer to reaching Heaven.

  • Why is it that only conservatives can be faithful Catholics? How do women deacons diminish the quality of the soul food you want and decreases your chances of reaching heaven?

    The new apostolic constitution should teach us the opposite lesson. The one true faith can accommodate different paths. The NO doesn’t detract from the TLM. The Church can appeal to conservatives and liberals.

  • Restrained Radical. the point is we either follow the teachings of Christ and the Church he established or not. We can’t make up our own ideas to go along with the whims of society. Pope Benedict has spoken of the Dictatorship of Relativism where sadly too many in the religious world model the Church after soicety.

    It is important to note that Jesus and the Early Church were counter cultural which is why the Church slowly grew, instead of rapidly. We must recall that in the Early Church everything thing matter and practice (especially as it pertained to sexuality) was permissible in the secular world. The Church wouldn’t even permit divorce let alone the varying sexual practices and orgies that were commonplace in the ancient world. Actually, if the Church really wanted to grow it would have permitted all of those things, since they were commonplace. The Church did not, which is eventually after many decades and about three centuries, the secular world saw the wisdom in the Church’s teachings and beliefs.

  • The Early Church didn’t have an Anglican Use, received Communion in the hand, probably sitting down, had Mass in the vernacular, women deacons, married clergy, and bishops elected by the laity. One can be liberal and orthodox.

    The Church thrived through inculturation. Traditionalists (those who believe it should be the only way, not merely an option) arbitrarily pick some point prior to Vatican II and say “That’s were the Church must freeze.” Evangelical Protestantism thrives today despite the fact that its members are more socially conservative than Catholics, mostly because it is extremely liberal in style. Too liberal for my taste but the point is that one can be liberal and orthodox.

  • Restrained Radical, with all due respect the Early Church was about as far from the liberal model of thinking as one could imagine. Public confessions, shunning of anyone in the secular world who was living a promiscuous lifetsyle (which was just about everyone who wasn’t a believer.) In addition what the priest or bishops said was stricly adhered to, as early as 96 AD we have records of the Church in Corinth sending a letter to the Pope (Clement I believe) asking what to do to resolve a theological matter. Keep in mind the Holy Father had to live in hiding and St John the Evangelist wasn’t that far from Corinth on Patmos, we can see the weight they put in obediance and orthodoxy.

    Remember when occasion heresies emerged where, say for example, someone didn’t believe in the Eucharist, the faithful themselves would volunteer to organize armies to wipe them out. As late as the 1400s, St Joan of Arc wanted to organize an army to wipe out Jon Huss in Bohemia and she wasn’t alone. As you can see for many of the faithful no quarter was given to liberalism and personal interpretations of Scripture.

    As for modern Evangelicalism, as I predicted in my book, “The Tide is Turning Toward Catholicism,” much of the mega church movement has already stalled and in some cases is in a free fall, some have turned to the Emergent Church movement and some have even become dissolutioned with that idea. Some big mega churches in Florida and other locations have folded up their tents and closed because of financial problems or because a charismatic pastor was replaced by someone less than charismatic. By 2020 mega churches of the world will, by and large, be a thing of the past. In times of trouble the faithful increasinly want to embrace the truth and to paraphrase Mark Shea, not “my own personal revelation of the moment.” The liberal self absorbed model is thankfully being replaced by the truth. The Dictatorship of Relativism is out and Pope Benedict XVI is in, Thanks be to God!

  • Tito:

    Again I can’t believe I’m agreeing with the lower case vowel again.

    You demonstrate remarkable reasoning here, Taco Man! I am deeply humbled. Although, it is not I that you are actually agreeing with here; it is more so our great vicar of Christ himself who’ve taught me much.

    Restrained Radical, I would prefer quality over quantity any day of the week. A smaller more faithful Church would only feed my soul and bring me ever closer to reaching Heaven.

    AMEN!

    It’s like that “Salt of the Earth” metaphor that then Cardinal Ratzinger had elaborated on in that same-titled book:

    He envisions a largely post-Christian world in which the church will be on the defensive, smaller in numbers, but, he hopes, more coherent and committed in its faith.

    Quality vs. Quantity: Personally, I believe Christ would rather have the few and the faithful as opposed to the many and the heretical.

  • e, I sometimes wonder if Benedict might be mistaken, and we instead see the emergence of a huger, committed Catholic Church.

  • Pinky,

    A Catholic Church blessed with a multitude of faithful Catholics would be a great blessing, I grant you that.

    Indeed, there is nothing more I would want than sharing the authentic Christian faith with those who genuinely adhere to it.

  • Restrained Rad, reading over this article and your comments, I think we’ve got a failure to communicate. I’ve seen four different things labelled “liberal Catholicism”:

    1) orthodox Catholicism which illuminates a person’s politics toward compassion for the poor and needy, which Americans call liberalism

    2) hope for the increased allowance of some of the newer (or very old) religious practices within the orthodox Catholic faith

    3) disobedience, or permissiveness toward disobedience

    4) doctrinal dissent, or permissiveness toward doctrinal dissent

    You mention things that could potentially fall under all four categories. I don’t think anyone here would dispute the holiness of concern for the well-being of the poor. Liturgical development and changes in specific rules of Church discipline are fine (although I’m personally shell-shocked, and I’d like to see things left alone for a while). Breaches in Church discipline for the sake of disobedience, well, that gets into motivation, and I’m glad I don’t have to decide what falls under category 2 or 3. The last category is full-on wrong.

    I think this article lumps categories 2 through 4 together.

  • As far as I’m concerned, the more “Catholics” that leave the Church, the better. They’ll leave room for the truly Catholic Catholics! We don’t need the Liberals and cultrual Catholics in our ranks, holding us back and trying to control our Church so that they can justify their sins and their lifestyle choices ~ or their sheer spiritual laziness that only brings them to Mass on Christmas and Easter.

    This is no rain on our parade ~ it is a cleansing of Holy Mother Church! And good riddence! Those empty spots left by lukewarms and Liberals mean we have more space for real Catholics!

  • Why can’t we simply do some sort of “Parish-Swap”, where we trade liberal Catholics for Conservative-minded Anglo-Catholics?

    That way, we not only welcome the traditionally-minded folks into the fold, we also do away with all the rubbish that is liberal Catholicism!

    There is much more to being Catholic, and much more to being Anglican, than taking sides in the culture wars.

    Your suggestion here shows that your real religion is culture war nonsense.

  • Precisely Michael. I find this “war” mentality very disconcerting. Do we really want people to “leave the Church?” Perhaps we should want them to continue in their process of conversion, as we are called to — not get out. One might gather that people who wish these things have no hope for these people — perhaps they do have it. It is surely hard to discern.

    But what I cannot gather is, how is sitting around in judgment of others’ Catholicism, or lack of it, to our spiritual betterment? Have we made it through that narrow gate, or are we confident we’re going to pass through it? For the way toward destruction is wide and spacious.

    Judgment comes to the hypocrites and sanctimonious just as it does to the unrighteous — and from my reading of the Gospels, more harshly. Sometimes I get the impression, because it is so incredibly hard to imagine otherwise, that the people who evince such, dare I say, a pharisaic tendency don’t offer anywhere near the number of prayers for ‘bad’ Catholics, for their conversion, and for their ultimate salvation at the mercy of God with all the sinners that has ever lived in the history of our species than the condemnations and persistent flammatory rants about these people and their spiritual and moral failings — no matter how objective they be. Does holiness not demand more of us?

    It is too easy to sit around and list the spiritual and moral failures of an individual, or a categorized group. It is another thing to reach out, to try to be the difference to these people. Sometimes this requires not be stridently and coldly objective. I did not convert because people were telling my that a “gay lifestyle” was going to lead me to Hell. I converted because there was a vibrantly orthodox priest that loved me as a person, who did not see me merely as a dissident Catholic. It is so reductionist to reduce a person merely their worldview or personal struggles, no matter how much those things define them. A person is made fundamentally in the image and likeness of God — there is our starting point and dare I say, our ending point.

    This has nothing to do with accomodating heterodox theological or moral views, or shifting away from orthopraxy. If I seem self-righteous, pray for me, the unbelievable sinner I am. To take one of the dissident issues very personally, I would rather be a sinner who made it through the narrow gate and a saint in heaven by the unfathomable mercy of God that struggling homosexuals can pray to (and are prayed for by), whose life may have changed theirs, before I ever sat in stridently objective judgment of “those people” who might as well leave the Church and let more orthodox people enter in a nice exchange.

    “Those who are well have no need of a physician, but those who are sick. But go and learn what this means: ‘I desire mercy and not sacrifice.’ For I did not come to call the righteous, but sinners, to repentance.”

  • You’ve made the mistake that these people are judging.

    They want to feed their souls.

    The modernists in the Catholic church, some not all, want a church that cannot exist.

    I completely agree about a church swap.

    The modernists do more harm by leading others astray. They’ve done more harm than good.

    Your comments are full of assumptions that are unwarranted.

  • Do they want to feed their souls? If I wasn’t aware of the fact (and maybe not an orthodox Catholic), I might not have guessed.

    Moreover, I do not understand how the fact that dissenting people wishing the impossible legitimizes “swapping” them for people who would wish to enter the Church. For afterward: would they return? Would we go after them? Or would we leave them to their “liberal” ways?

    I cannot see why we cannot simply invite those who wish the fullness of truth and be the Catholics we need to be to our brethren who are on the fringes of orthodoxy. Why do they need to leave? I’m not a huge fan of the “get out” mentality. I don’t think it’s reasonable.

    Even if modernists do harm to the Church from within, I don’t see how those desperately insistent on orthopraxis — as good and noble the intention is — but if it is done to the point of throwing virtue out the window, I’m not convinced that some, particularly the most extreme traditionalists, do not bear culpability as well.

  • Eric,

    You may be describing an obscure minority.

    I’m all for church swapping, but I believe it is more rhetoric than anything else.

    I’ve witnessed many, many priests, even today in the archdiocese that you and I share, continue blurring the lines between the teachings of the church so that anything is permissible.

    Believe me, just because Pope Benedict’s initiatives have sprung doesn’t mean that those that want to harm the church are gone, nor are they sincerely ignorant of the truth. I have had to bite my tongue often to post about these dissident priests in our archdiocese. I have decided to let Cardinal DiNardo do it quietly rather than make more of a scandal than it already is.

    Yes, extreme traditionalists do bear culpability. The way they judge others without getting to know the person. They way they lack charity and gossip about others behind their backs. Especially how snobby they can be. I have friends who are extreme traditionalists and I see how uncharitable their behavior can be. And I do call them out on it all of the time.

    As far as church swapping, it represents my sentiments of how disgusted I am at both priests and laypeople that continue to teach, proselytize, and live worldly lives and values openly and without a sense of wrong that gets my gander. Believe me there are more than 10 times those type of people than there are extreme traditionalists.

    Believe me, they will leave (not all, some or maybe many) under their own recognizance before we ask them to leave (which no one has asked them to, but have only suggested on websites such as ours). Once they learn more of what it means to be a Catholic than to be of the world.

  • Has Eric and Michael Iafrate ever even consulted Scripture itself and look towards why Jesus Himself said that those who dissent from Church teaching (Mt 18:17) are to be treated as a heathen or publican?

    How many heretics in the early church won the hearts of innocent Christians simply because they were welcomed and embraced by those in the Church herself, which seemed to legitimize them and their heretical beliefs?

    An example of this is to be found within the Arian heresy which insinuated itself through countless ranks of the flock simply because of this error.

    Such a case is to be found today where many countless Catholics have succumbed to the Protestant notion that there is no such thing as the ‘Real Presence’, as traditionally defined by the Church, and that the Eucharist is nothing more than merely a symbol.

    Those naive continue to fall into such heresy because of how Catholics like Eric and Michael Iafrate would rather ’embrace’ such Catholics instead of subscribing to the same treatment of them as Jesus Himself had prescribed.

    It is no wonder why heresies such as this continues to gain ground amongst the majority of Catholics today within the Church but errors such as ‘abortion is a right, not an act of murder’ is likewise adopted and embraced not only by those who truly believe in such a horrendous notion as this but also by the innocent who unwittingly accept such an error because errant Catholics like their CCD teachers tell them it is so.

  • Wow, I checked back and found quite the debate going on. All I can say is this in response to the statement, “The one true faith can accommodate different paths”: So long as they don’t bear the taint of dissent. It doesn’t take much to smell out a rat.

  • “So long as they don’t bear the taint of dissent. It doesn’t take much to smell out a rat.”

    The problem being that there are those Catholics who would gladly accomodate the rats, even if innocent members of the church itself suffers that black plague of heresy which would tragically claim the very lives of many of the Faithful.

  • e.,

    So e., when are you going to add a pic to your avatar?

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